Title

Topic

  • Kwoka co-edits volume on antitrust economics

    Neal F. Finnegan Distinguished Professor of economics John Kwoka has co-edited a book titled “Antitrust Economics at a Time of Upheaval: Recent Competition Policy Cases on Two Continents.” From the publisher’s page: “The past decade has been a time of great upheaval for transatlantic competition policy. … With the reinvigoration of antitrust policy has come a reinvigoration of antitrust economics, which has been increasingly prominent in the reasoning of regulators and courts. This volume … provides 18 contributions from leading antitrust economists involved in recent groundbreaking merger, monopolization and anticompetitive-agreement cases on both sides of the Atlantic.”

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  • ‘Action Research’ can empower higher education administrators toward better problem solving

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    In “Faculty Development: Achieving Change Through Action Research,” three professors from the Northeastern University College of Professional Studies want to “empower all administrators in higher education to engage more effectively in resolving challenges in colleges and universities,” the publisher’s webpage states. This empowerment comes through “”Action Research… a powerful, localized methodology for impacting difficult and complex issues embedded in organizations.”

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  • ‘Documentary Film and Institutional Behavioral Change: A Student-Driven Mobilization for Sustainability’

    “There are multiple methods available to convey the need for sustainability. However, most often communications are limited to one discipline or one instructional medium, which limits engagement and even interest. In the summer of 2021, students at Northeastern University working with their faculty advisor, adopted a multidisciplinary approach to discussing sustainability by producing a documentary film. The subject of the film is waste resulting from convenience consumption of coffee at the University’s multiple coffee shops.” Find this book chapter and the full list of authors in Educating the Sustainability Leaders of the Future.

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  • ‘Aligning Economic Measurement With Well-Being: Sustainability’

    “Gross domestic product (GDP) has been the prevailing global metric for measuring economic growth for the past 70 years. This is the same time period that is credited with the observation of manmade climate change. … To the extent that market prices and participants do not include holistic impacts of resource use and instead determine value based on immediate gratification, GDP growth is correlated with negative externalities, which impose limits on the future quality of life. … In this chapter, we explore how GDP gained traction on a global scale and how the indicator is tied to climate change.”

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  • As all politics become climate politics, what we need are ‘diverse leaders,’ Stephens says

    Dean’s professor of sustainability science and policy Jennie C. Stephens published “Diversifying Power: Why We Need Antiracist, Feminist Leadership on Climate and Energy” in September 2020. According to the publisher’s webpage, “Stephens takes a closer look at climate and energy leadership related to job creation and economic justice, health and nutrition, housing and transportation. She looks at why we need to resist by investing in bold diverse leadership to curb the ‘the polluter elite.’ We need to reclaim and restructure climate and energy systems so policies are explicitly linked to social, economic, and racial justice.”

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  • Bucar wins John G. Cawelti Award for Best Textbook

    Elizabeth Bucar, professor of religion, has won the John G. Cawelti Award for best textbook from the Popular Culture Association for her book “Stealing My Religion: Not Just Any Cultural Appropriation.”

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  • Finding a ‘systemic approach’ to climate action

    Madhavi Venkatesan, associate teaching professor of economics, has published a chapter in the “Handbook of Multi-Level Climate Actions.” From the publisher’s page, the handbook “emphasizes the need for significant climate action by every capable person on the planet at multiple levels of human experience and society. … It highlights the many ways that our species can meet the climate crisis and how entities at every level of human experience are, could be, and should be developing and implementing climate solutions.” Venkatesan’s chapter is titled “Culture, Education and Sustainability: A Systemic Approach.” Find more about the book at Edward Elgar Publishing.

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  • Self-reflection encouraged for teachers in ‘My Teaching Routine’

    Mark Martin, assistant professor in computer science and education practice at Northeastern University London, has published a book called “My Teaching Routine.” “This book encourages you to reflect on your teaching style,” the publishing copy reads, “and challenges you to understand when things are going well, when things need change and when they need to be dropped.” A book launch was held on March 15, 2023, over Zoom.

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  • Robots can ‘see, smell, hear and perceive touch’

    “Electrical and computer engineering professor Ravinder Dahiya has published a book on ‘Sensory Systems for Robotic Applications.’ Topics covered in this edited book,” the abstract reads, “include various types of sensors used in robotics, sensing schemes (e-skin, tactile skin, e-nose, neuromorphic vision and touch), sensing technologies and their applications including healthcare, prosthetics, robotics and wearables.” Read more about the book, and find the full abstract, at the publisher’s page.

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  • ‘First and Foremost’: A literary journal from the first-generation, undocumented and low-income community at Northeastern

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    “‘First and Foremost’ is a journal of writing and art created and published by the first-gen, undocumented, and low-income community at Northeastern. The journal is advised by Caitlin Thornbrugh, associate teaching professor in English and director of the Writing Minor, and Kat Gonso, teaching professor in English and director of the Writing Center. Students who identify as part of the first-generation, low-income, and/or undocumented community are invited and encouraged to submit creative pieces.”

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  • Popular culture poses a challenge to the ‘failing theories’ of neoclassical economics, Strychacz argues

    Thomas Strychacz, professor of English at Mills College and in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities, has published “Popular Culture and Political Economic Thought: Fables of Commonwealth.” From the publisher’s website, this project “examines a variety of animated movies, TV shows, written fictions, adventure travelogues, and Paleo archeologies (and diets) to suggest that popular culture poses a multiform challenge to the failing theories and practices of neoclassical economics.” Find “Popular Culture and Political Economic Thought” at Lexington Books.

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  • Using computer science to tell stories ‘that make a difference’

    In “Code for What?: Computer Science for Storytelling and Social Justice,” Clifford Lee and co-author Elisabeth Soep ask, “What if coding were a justice-driven medium for storytelling rather than a narrow technical skill?” The authors show why computer coding can be more than a career-motivated pursuit, but can also be used for the social good. “Code for What?” tells the “stories of a diverse group of young people in Oakland, California, who combine journalism, data, design, and code to create media that makes a difference.”

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  • Book chapter, ‘Socially Responsible Consumption and Marketing in Practice’

    “Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter offer both unique and overlapping opportunities to connect with people. The use of images and visual content reduces language barriers, while ease of access to these media applications increases routine engagement. This chapter provides a brief historical overview of social media, specifically addressing how social media has been used for advertising and information dissemination.” Find “Socially Responsible Consumption and Marketing in Practice,” which appears in “Dealing with Socially Responsible Customers,” and see the full list of authors at the publisher’s webpage.

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  • Using coding languages to teach vibrational mechanics

    “Vibrational Mechanics by Maple Practical Applications” promises “to assist undergraduate and postgraduate students majoring in physics, mechanical engineering, electromechanical and aerospace engineering in acquiring a more thorough knowledge of vibrational mechanics using the Maple programming language.” Read more about the book and see the full list of authors, including Northeastern University affiliated research professor of physics Mohammad Khoshnevisan, at the publisher’s website.

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  • D’Amore-McKim professors offer framework for digitally transforming businesses

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    Four professors in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business—Koen Pauwels, Zeynep Aksehirli, Yakov Bart and Kwong Chan—have published “Break the Wall: Democratize Digital In Your Business,” which examines issues facing businesses undergoing digital transformation. The authors have identified a fundamental problem: that “many [organizations] take a very narrow view” toward digital transformation, Pauwels writes in a LinkedIn post, while their “leaders recognize the tidal wave of digital change, with the C-Suite… focused on much larger issues.” To combat this differential, the authors propose a “Nested Adaptive Framework to work through digital transformation tasks at each level in the organization.”

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  • Whiteness and the overdisciplining of BIPOC students

    Mills College Department Chair of Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Natalee Kēhaulani Bauer’s book “Tender Violence in US Schools: Benevolent Whiteness and the Dangers of Heroic White Womanhood” challenges perceptions that “the over-disciplining of Black and Indigenous students is… a problem located within pathologized or misunderstood communities.” Instead, she argues that standards of education in the United States arise out of a racist framework. She examines “how white women (the majority of US teachers) have historically understood their roles in the disciplining of Black and Indigenous students,” and how these roles came to support of the white settler colonial state.

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  • Illustrated activism: Celebrating ‘the daily lives of Black folks’

    In the book “Living While Black: Portraits of Everyday Resistance,” professor of African American literature Ajuan Mance presents illustrated scenes of Black folks as they go about their daily lives. The book “celebrates the small acts of resistance” that arise out of daily living, and displays the “many ways to be an activist.” The book also contains a foreword by Black Lives Matter founder Alicia Garza.

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  • Pluralizing research in mental health policy

    David A. Rochefort, arts and sciences distinguished professor of political science, and Jared Hirschfield ’20, have co-authored a book chapter titled “National, State, and Local Mental Health Policy: Meeting the Needs for Research Pluralism and Application of Knowledge” in the recently published “Research Handbook on Mental Health Policy.” See the publisher’s webpage for more information.

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  • Nusbaum receives 2022 AESA Critics’ Choice Book Award

    Emily Nusbaum and Jessica Nina Lester (Indiana University) have won the American Educational Studies Association 2022 award for their recent co-edited book, “Centering Diverse Bodyminds in Critical Qualitative Inquiry.” The editors approach “disability embodiment and the lived experience of disability [as] potential sources of method and methodological advancement.”

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  • Advances in imaging amphibian regeneration

    This book chapter (from “Salamanders: Methods and Protocols”) provides an alternative protocol to the in situ hybridization of amphibians. While this protocol “has been utilized for decades in axolotls, it has been challenging to implement consistently across tissues.” The authors here present an approach combining a hybridized chain reaction (HCR) with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), providing a method with “a considerably higher signal to background” noise ratio. See the full list of authors and read this book chapter, “Hybridization Chain Reaction Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (HCR-FISH) in Ambystoma mexicanum Tissue,” at the publisher’s page.

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  • Raising (regenerative) axolotls for experimental uses

    Mexican axolotls are capable of regenerating “amputated limbs and injured body parts,” and their study is valuable to both stem cell and regeneration research. From “Salamanders: Methods and Protocols”, this book chapter by professor James Monaghan and PhD. Anastasia Yandulskaya presents the conditions for raising lab-healthy axolotls, how to breed them, and how to maintain their environment. Read this book chapter, “Establishing a New Research Axolotl Colony,” at the publisher’s page.

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  • Book of visual poetry from Mills College professor

    Carlota Caulfield, head of Spanish and Spanish American studies at Mills College, with J.M. Calleja, has published “GHROMYT,” a collaborative work of experimental, visual poetry.

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