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Topic

  • How secret police reports and literature commingle

    In “Surveillance, the Cold War, and Latin American Literature,” Daniel Noemi Voionmaa, an associate professor of cultures, societies and global studies at Northeastern University, combines an examination of Cold War-era secret police reports of Latin American authors with a critical reading of those authors’ own texts, establishing “a critical dialogue between the spies’ surveillance and the writers’ novels, short stories, and poems, and presents a new take on Latin American modernity,” according to the publisher’s webpage. Authors discussed include Gabriel García Márquez, Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz and others.

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  • Exploring the history of woodworking through gender

    Deirdre Visser, adjunct professor and visiting curator at Mills College at Northeastern, has published “Joinery, Joists and Gender: A History of Woodworking for the 21st Century.” The publisher’s webpage describes the book as “the first publication of its kind to survey the long and rich histories of women and gender non-conforming persons who work in wood.” After providing a history of women’s contributions — practical and philosophical — to woodworking in Europe and the U.S., the volume continues with “sixteen in-depth profiles of contemporary woodworkers, all of whom identify fine woodworking as their principal vocation.”

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  • This beer offers a window to the world. Northeastern professor’s book tracks ‘The Rise of Pilsner’

    Assistant teaching professor Malcolm Purinton’s book “Globalization in a Glass: The Rise of Pilsner Beer through Technology, Taste and Empire” traces pilsner’s impact through the global shifts of the 19th century.

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  • Book chapter: ‘Sustainability: A Business Case for Adoption’

    “A central focus of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is poverty elimination. However, given that poverty is both an input and outcome of our present economic system, there appears to be a contradiction in the expectation for businesses to operationalize the SDGs. … This discussion highlights the relationship between the United Nations Global Compact as an SDG integration tool for businesses and the use of corporate social responsibility reporting and the environmental, social and governance attribution as business marketing channels to promote sustainability branding.” Find the chapter and full list of authors in “Sustainability in Business Education, Research and Practices.”

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  • ‘Solid-State Sensors’ invites ‘advanced students’ into the field

    Ravinder Dahiya, professor of electrical and computer engineering, with co-authors Ambarish Paul and Mitradip Bhattacharjee, has published “Solid-State Sensors,” an “up-to-date introduction to solid-state sensors, materials, fabrication processes and applications,” according to the publisher’s webpage. Oriented toward “advanced students and professionals in disciplines such as electrical and electronics engineering, physics, chemistry and biomedical engineering,” the textbook includes “the fundamentals and classification of all major types of solid-state sensors, including piezoresistive, capacitive, thermometric, optical bio-chemical, magnetic and acoustic-based sensors.”

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  • Hip-hop may be a house ‘that young people built,’ but ‘Hip-Hop Archives’ are here for everyone

    Professor of communication studies Murray Forman has co-edited “Hip-Hop Archives: The Politics and Poetics of Knowledge Production,” which collects scholarship on modern archival practices in hip-hop culture, espousing multi-generational collaborations in archives that scale in size from government institutions to bedroom closets.

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  • Professor’s new book shines light on how architectural works are in constant conversation with the past

    With “The Architecture of Influence,” associate professor of architecture Amanda Lawrence explores how architectural copies, imitations, emulations and more interact to create an ongoing conversation between the present and the past.

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  • Introductory textbook on human services present ‘a complex and interwoven system’

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    Director of the human services program and senior research associate at the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy Lori Gardinier, working with teaching professors in human services Emily Mann, Matthew Lee and Simmons University associate professor Lydia Ogden, have published “Introduction to Human Services and Social Change: History, Practice, and Policy.” The publisher’s webpage describes the book as an “introductory text that provides a foundation for future human service professionals interested in the intersection of theory, research and practice.” The textbook places “human services professionals within a complex and interwoven system” for students and practitioners.

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  • Ghuman traces musical intermingling in ‘Resonances of the Raj’

    Professor of music Nalini Ghuman’s book “Resonances of the Raj: India in the English Musical Imagination, 1897-1947,” studies the overlooked transmission of musical influences between English and Indian culture “during the last fifty years of the Indo-British encounter,” according to the book’s companion website. “Ghuman reintegrates music into the cultural history of the British Raj, revealing unexpected minglings of peoples, musics and ideas that raise questions about ‘Englishness,’ about the nature of Empire and about the fixedness of identity.”

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  • Interdisciplinary team of Northeastern researchers propose ‘Reengineering the Sharing Economy’

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    Professors Yakov Bart, Rashmi Dyal-Chand, Ozlem Ergun and Babak Heydari have edited and contributed to — along with numerous Northeastern-affiliated faculty and students — “Reengineering the Sharing Economy: Design, Policy and Regulation.” The volume arises from questions like, “Will there be any workers in the sharing economy? Can we know enough about these technologies to regulate them? Is there any way to avoid the monopolization of assets?” A radically interdisciplinary collection of articles exploring the modern sharing economy, “this volume examines the challenge of reengineering a sharing economy that is more equitable, democratic, sustainable and just,” according to the publisher’s…

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  • How family doctors can save ‘Primary Care on the Brink’: Hoff argues for the return of the generalist

    In “Searching for the Family Doctor: Primary Care on the Brink,” Timothy Hoff, professor of management, health care systems and public policy, argues that “The family doctor,” according to the publisher’s webpage, “was conceived of as a powered-up version of the ‘country doctor’ idea. At a time when doctor-patient relationships are evaporating in the face of highly transactional, fast-food-style medical practice, this ideal seems both nostalgic and revolutionary.” Hoff explores “how to save primary care by giving family doctors a fighting chance to become the generalists we need in our lives.”

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  • Dean Hazel Sive edits volume detailing African frog research and best practices that informed her ‘life’s work’

    Dean of the College of Science and professor of biology at Northeastern University Hazel Sive has edited “Xenopus: A Laboratory Manual,” a new textbook that presents “a comprehensive collection of experimental procedures for research using Xenopus.”

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  • New book collecting cutting-edge, evidence-based research on crime and justice policy aims to ‘chip away at the resistance to change’

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    Professor of criminology and criminal justice Brandon Welsh has co-edited “The Oxford Handbook of Evidence-Based Crime and Justice Policy,” which contains 32 chapters of research around evidence-based policy in practice from over 50 “scholars and practitioners.”

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  • Game design textbook teaches the ‘deep patterns that underlie good design’

    Associate teaching professor Christopher Barney’s textbook Pattern Language for Game Design looks to the field of architecture for its lessons, specifically architect Christopher Alexander. Using Alexander’s work as a framework, the textbook offers “a series of practical, rigorous exercises [with which] designers can observe and analyze the failures and successes of the games they know and love to find the deep patterns that underlie good design,” the publisher’s webpage states. Using pattern theory, “this book seeks to transform how we look at building the interactive experiences that shape us.”

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  • Stephens pens chapter on ‘Gender and Climate Justice’ in Handbook on Climate Change and Technology

    Professor Jennie Stephens has written a chapter in the Handbook on Climate Change and Technology. From the abstract: “The dominance of patriarchal systems and processes must be continuously revealed to understand why efforts so far have been inadequate and to prioritize a path forward to advance investments in climate justice. This chapter demonstrates why a feminist lens is essential for climate justice by first describing how patriarchal ways are non-transformative. … With a focus on climate justice, it becomes clear why feminist priorities and principles are required to move away from climate isolationism to climate justice.”

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  • Grassroots journalism promotes democracy and fills the needs of ‘news deserts’

    “Local news is essential to democracy,” argue professor of journalism Dan Kennedy and former Boston Globe editor Ellen Clegg in their new book, “What Works in Community News: Media Startups, News Deserts and the Future of the Fourth Estate.” They write that, as news organizations shutter, “it is often marginalized communities of color who have been left without the day-to-day journalism they need to govern themselves in a democracy,” according to the publisher’s webpage. The book describes how “innovative journalism models are popping up across the country to fill news deserts and empower communities.”

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  • Professor’s new book provides best practices — and pitfalls — of remote work

    Executive professor of management and organizational development Barbara Larson’s new book, “Remote and Hybrid Work: What Everyone Needs To Know,” is a guide for individuals and managers, as well as corporate and governmental policymakers.

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  • This textbook explores how common words in health care work ‘in different, sometimes competing ways’

    Sari Altschuler, associate professor of English, has co-edited a new textbook, “Keywords for Health Humanities,” that unsettles the assumptions made by the modern health care industry around common terminology.

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  • With new industrial ecology textbook, Matthew Eckelman suggests we treat industry ‘more like nature’

    Associate professor of civil and environmental engineering Matthew Eckelman has co-authored “Industrial Ecology and Sustainability,” a new edition of a seminal textbook in the field of industrial ecology, which asks, “How can we make the industrial system act more like nature?”

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  • ‘Covid-19 and the Law’ asks ‘the right questions’ about the pandemic and its effects

    Assistant professor of law and health sciences Katherine Kraschel has co-edited a new volume on the COVID-19 pandemic’s “enduring effect across the entire spectrum of law and policy.” According to the publisher’s website, “This collection provides a critical reflection on what changes the pandemic has already introduced and what its legacy may be. Chapters evaluate how healthcare and government institutions have succeeded and failed during this global ‘stress test’ and explore how … to ensure we are better prepared for future pandemics. This timely volume identifies the right questions to ask as we take stock of pandemic realities.”

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  • ‘The Structure of Racial Identity: Comparing Non-Hispanic White and Black Americans’

    “This study focuses on the measurement and modeling of Racial Identification among non-Hispanic White and Black Americans. … We examine the underlying structure of racial identity. Here, our focus is on whether a comparable and reliable composite measure of Racial Identification (RI) can be constructed. … We then turn to an examination of how RI is distributed in the social structure, with a special focus on the effects of race. … Our results show noteworthy racial group differences both in levels of RI, and in several of its determinants.” Find this book chapter and authors’ listing in Advancing Identity Theory,…

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  • Kwoka co-edits volume on antitrust economics

    Neal F. Finnegan Distinguished Professor of economics John Kwoka has co-edited a book titled “Antitrust Economics at a Time of Upheaval: Recent Competition Policy Cases on Two Continents.” From the publisher’s page: “The past decade has been a time of great upheaval for transatlantic competition policy. … With the reinvigoration of antitrust policy has come a reinvigoration of antitrust economics, which has been increasingly prominent in the reasoning of regulators and courts. This volume … provides 18 contributions from leading antitrust economists involved in recent groundbreaking merger, monopolization and anticompetitive-agreement cases on both sides of the Atlantic.”

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  • ‘Action Research’ can empower higher education administrators toward better problem solving

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    In “Faculty Development: Achieving Change Through Action Research,” three professors from the Northeastern University College of Professional Studies want to “empower all administrators in higher education to engage more effectively in resolving challenges in colleges and universities,” the publisher’s webpage states. This empowerment comes through “”Action Research… a powerful, localized methodology for impacting difficult and complex issues embedded in organizations.”

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  • ‘Documentary Film and Institutional Behavioral Change: A Student-Driven Mobilization for Sustainability’

    “There are multiple methods available to convey the need for sustainability. However, most often communications are limited to one discipline or one instructional medium, which limits engagement and even interest. In the summer of 2021, students at Northeastern University working with their faculty advisor, adopted a multidisciplinary approach to discussing sustainability by producing a documentary film. The subject of the film is waste resulting from convenience consumption of coffee at the University’s multiple coffee shops.” Find this book chapter and the full list of authors in Educating the Sustainability Leaders of the Future.

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  • ‘Aligning Economic Measurement With Well-Being: Sustainability’

    “Gross domestic product (GDP) has been the prevailing global metric for measuring economic growth for the past 70 years. This is the same time period that is credited with the observation of manmade climate change. … To the extent that market prices and participants do not include holistic impacts of resource use and instead determine value based on immediate gratification, GDP growth is correlated with negative externalities, which impose limits on the future quality of life. … In this chapter, we explore how GDP gained traction on a global scale and how the indicator is tied to climate change.”

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  • As all politics become climate politics, what we need are ‘diverse leaders,’ Stephens says

    Dean’s professor of sustainability science and policy Jennie C. Stephens published “Diversifying Power: Why We Need Antiracist, Feminist Leadership on Climate and Energy” in September 2020. According to the publisher’s webpage, “Stephens takes a closer look at climate and energy leadership related to job creation and economic justice, health and nutrition, housing and transportation. She looks at why we need to resist by investing in bold diverse leadership to curb the ‘the polluter elite.’ We need to reclaim and restructure climate and energy systems so policies are explicitly linked to social, economic, and racial justice.”

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  • Bucar wins John G. Cawelti Award for Best Textbook

    Elizabeth Bucar, professor of religion, has won the John G. Cawelti Award for best textbook from the Popular Culture Association for her book “Stealing My Religion: Not Just Any Cultural Appropriation.”

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  • Finding a ‘systemic approach’ to climate action

    Madhavi Venkatesan, associate teaching professor of economics, has published a chapter in the “Handbook of Multi-Level Climate Actions.” From the publisher’s page, the handbook “emphasizes the need for significant climate action by every capable person on the planet at multiple levels of human experience and society. … It highlights the many ways that our species can meet the climate crisis and how entities at every level of human experience are, could be, and should be developing and implementing climate solutions.” Venkatesan’s chapter is titled “Culture, Education and Sustainability: A Systemic Approach.” Find more about the book at Edward Elgar Publishing.

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  • Self-reflection encouraged for teachers in ‘My Teaching Routine’

    Mark Martin, assistant professor in computer science and education practice at Northeastern University London, has published a book called “My Teaching Routine.” “This book encourages you to reflect on your teaching style,” the publishing copy reads, “and challenges you to understand when things are going well, when things need change and when they need to be dropped.” A book launch was held on March 15, 2023, over Zoom.

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