Title

Topic

  • Finding a ‘systemic approach’ to climate action

    Madhavi Venkatesan, associate teaching professor of economics, has published a chapter in the “Handbook of Multi-Level Climate Actions.” From the publisher’s page, the handbook “emphasizes the need for significant climate action by every capable person on the planet at multiple levels of human experience and society. … It highlights the many ways that our species can meet the climate crisis and how entities at every level of human experience are, could be, and should be developing and implementing climate solutions.” Venkatesan’s chapter is titled “Culture, Education and Sustainability: A Systemic Approach.” Find more about the book at Edward Elgar Publishing.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Carrier receives honorable mention for advancing macular degeneration research

    “Chemical engineering professor Rebecca Carrier received an honorable mention during the National Eye Institute 3-D Retina Organoid Challenge. Carrier’s team created an organoid-microvessel co-culture system that proposes to add vasculature embedded in a biomimetic hydrogel to organoids to increase oxygen and nutrient flow and mimic the chemical and physical cues present in developing eye tissue. The system also includes retinal pigmented epithelium and can be used to model and study age-related macular degeneration.” Read more about the associated research at the National Institutes of Health.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Hashmi receives NSF CAREER Award for work illuminating blood clots

    “Chemical engineering assistant professor Sara Hashmi was awarded a $550,000 NSF CAREER award for ‘In situ Polymer Gelation in Confined Flows’ to examine how polymer gels flow through tight spaces to better predict clogging behavior such as blood flow through a vessel.”

    Learn more

  • ‘Protected or Porous: A Comparative Analysis of Threat Detection Capability of IoT Safeguards’

    ,

    “Consumer Internet of Things (IoT) devices are increasingly common, from smart speakers to security cameras, in homes. Along with their benefits come potential privacy and security threats. To limit these threats a number of commercial services have become available (IoT safeguards). The safeguards claim to provide protection against IoT privacy risks and security threats. However, the effectiveness and the associated privacy risks of these safeguards remains a key open question. In this paper, we investigate the threat detection capabilities of IoT safeguards for the first time.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors in ArXiv.

    Learn more

  • ‘High Purity Hydrogen Separation With HT-PBI Based Electrochemical Pump Operation at 120 °C’

    “Electrochemical Hydrogen Pumps (EHP) provide a unique highly efficient means of separating and compressing hydrogen with continuous steady-state operation. In this paper, we demonstrate the performance of a commercially available, polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane based platform as a benchmark for ultra-high efficiency performance.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society.

    Learn more

    , ,
  • Instead of legislating climate change, act on it, Northeastern professors argue

    ,

    Northeastern University professors Joan Fitzgerald and Ted Landsmark, with decarbonization expert Michael J. Walsh, have penned a new article titled “No More Climate Legislation Needed; It’s Time for Action.” They write that, “In our recent assessment of Boston’s climate action plans for the Boston Foundation, we found that Boston is at risk of not being able to achieve its net-zero 2050 goal.” Ultimately, however, the authors are hopeful, noting that we know the steps we need to take, “the problem is that we have not been taking the necessary actions to achieve these goals.”

    Learn more

    ,
  • ‘Prioritized Mass Spectrometry Increases the Depth, Sensitivity and Sata Completeness of Single-Cell Proteomics’

    “Major aims of single-cell proteomics include increasing the consistency, sensitivity and depth of protein quantification, especially for proteins and modifications of biological interest. Here, to simultaneously advance all these aims, we developed prioritized Single-Cell ProtEomics (pSCoPE). … These strategies increased the sensitivity, data completeness and proteome coverage over twofold. The gains enabled quantifying protein variation in untreated and lipopolysaccharide-treated primary macrophages.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors in Nature Methods.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Isolating plastics to analyze pollutants

    Professor of marine and environmental sciences Aron Stubbins, working with graduate teaching assistant Erin Tuttle, has published a new paper in Environmental Pollution describing “An acidic/oxidative digestion that quantitatively removes cellulose acetate.” This process “preserve[s] plastics while digesting synthetic cellulose acetate and a range of organics encountered in environmental samples,” thus isolating the plastics for further study. Find “An optimized acidic digestion for the isolation of microplastics from biota-rich samples and cellulose acetate matrices” in Environmental Pollution.

    Learn more

    ,
  • ‘Lattice Network for Lightweight Image Restoration’

    “Deep learning has made unprecedented progress in image restoration (IR), where residual block (RB) is popularly used and has a significant effect on promising performance. However, the massive stacked RBs bring about burdensome memory and computation cost. To tackle this issue, we aim to design an economical structure for adaptively connecting pair-wise RBs, thereby enhancing the model representation.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors in IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence.

    Learn more

  • ‘Going Beyond Binary: Rapid Identification of Protein–Protein Interaction Modulators’

    “Kinetic target-guided synthesis (KTGS) is a powerful screening approach that enables identification of small molecule modulators for biomolecules. While many KTGS variants have emerged, a majority of the examples suffer from limited throughput and a poor signal/noise ratio, hampering reliable hit detection. Herein, we present our optimized multifragment KTGS screening strategy that tackles these limitations.” Read “Going Beyond Binary: Rapid Identification of Protein–Protein Interaction Modulators Using a Multifragment Kinetic Target-Guided Synthesis Approach” and see the full list of authors in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Breakthrough in early osteoarthritis diagnoses, potentially improving patient outcomes

    “Early [osteoarthritis] diagnosis is critical. … Computed tomography (CT) has been considered for cartilage imaging … by introducing radio-opaque contrast agents like ioxaglate (IOX) into the joint. IOX, however, is anionic and thus repelled by negatively charged cartilage glycosaminoglycans. … Here we engineer optimally charged cationic contrast agents … such that they can penetrate through the full thickness of cartilage.” Read “Cationic Carrier Mediated Delivery of Anionic Contrast Agents in Low Doses Enable Enhanced Computed Tomography Imaging of Cartilage for Early Osteoarthritis Diagnosis” and see the full list of authors in ACS Publications.

    Learn more

  • From climate denial to climate delay: Fossil fuel companies’ communications strategies

    , ,

    This article illuminates how fossil fuel companies’ messaging and communications have shifted “away from outright climate denial to more nuanced discourses of climate delay.” By examining four major companies’ global Twitter accounts (BP, ExxonMobil, Shell, and TotalEnergies), the authors note their strategies link “renewables to natural gas and promot[e] natural gas as part of their corporate response to climate change” in an attempt “to delay the energy transition and obstruct climate action.” Read “Fossil fuel companies’ climate communication strategies: Industry messaging on renewables and natural gas” and see the full list of authors at Energy Research & Social Science.

    Learn more

    , ,
  • Melodia inducted into collaborative Air Force Honorary Commander and Director Program

    “Electrical and computer engineering William Lincoln Smith Professor Tommaso Melodia is one of ten local directors to be inducted into the Hanscom Air Force Base Honorary Commander and Director program.” The program “pairs military-connected commanders and directors with civic counterparts to foster relationships, collaborate and share ideas, and build rapport between key community members and senior leaders at Hanscom” Air Force Base, the base wrote in a press release.

    Learn more

  • ‘Exploring Multilingual Students’ Feedback Literacy in an Asynchronous Online Writing Course’

    “Contributing to the scarce empirical examination of multilingual student writers’ feedback literacy development in ESL contexts, this exploratory qualitative study drew upon five multilingual international students’ feedback interactions, their developing drafts and end-of-unit reflections to empirically examine and extend Yu et al.’s (2022) five-dimension feedback literacy model.”

    Learn more

    ,
  • Magowan publishes short story ‘Litter Box’

    Kim Magowan, adjunct professor of English and Aurelia H. Reinhardt professor of American literature at Mills College at Northeastern University, has published the short story “Litter Box.” “Litter Box” tells the story of one woman’s spur-of-the-moment trip to London and her confusion around how life has brought her there.

    Learn more

    ,
  • China Insights Series: How Chinese companies are reinventing management control

    Professor George Yip gave a presentation in the China Insight Series. “China’s companies have long been acclaimed for their manufacturing prowess and, more recently, for their pragmatic approach to innovation. It’s time to recognize how they are also reinventing management control for the digital era through an approach we call ‘digitally-enhanced directed autonomy,’ which gives employees autonomy while monitoring more precisely how they exercise it.”

    Learn more

  • ‘Highly-Sensitive Label-Free Deep Profiling of N-glycans Released From Biomedically-Relevant Samples’

    “Alterations of protein glycosylation can serve as sensitive and specific disease biomarkers. Labeling procedures for improved separation and detectability of oligosaccharides have several drawbacks, including incomplete derivatization, side-products, noticeable desialylation/defucosylation, sample loss, and interference with downstream analyses. Here, we develop a label-free workflow based on high sensitivity capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CZE-MS) for profiling of native underivatized released N-glycans.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors at Nature Communications.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Muñoz wins NSF CAREER Grant for ‘floodplain sedimentation’ research

    “Samuel Muñoz, assistant professor, marine and environmental sciences and civil and environmental engineering, has been awarded a $718,000 National Science Foundation CAREER grant to study floodplain sedimentation through observation and simulation to improve flood hazard assessments.”

    Learn more

    ,
  • Building narratives through the interpretation of paintings

    Teaching professor of Arabic Shakir Mustafa, working with independent artist Maysaloun Faraj, has published a new paper arguing that “responses to art—such as commentary on paintings—construct narratives that run parallel to these artistic works.” By selecting specific paintings by Faraj, and reviewing “the commentary on these paintings by Shakir Mustafa… examine[s] ways of narrativizing art to reflect on the urge to create, receive, interpret and circulate cultural products.” Read “Art, Community and Social Media in Maysaloun Faraj’s Contemporary Work” in the Journal of Contemporary Iraq & the Arab World.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Patent award for device that classifies wireless signals

    , ,

    “Electrical and computer engineering research assistant professor Salvatore D’Oro, William Lincoln Smith Professor Tommaso Melodia, and assistant professor Francesco Restuccia were awarded a patent for ‘Device and Method for Reliable Classification of Wireless Signals.'”

    Learn more

    ,
  • Patent for ‘Real-Time Cognitive Wireless Networking’

    ,

    “Electrical and computer engineering assistant professor Francesco Restuccia and William L. Smith Professor Tommaso Melodia were awarded a patent for ‘Real-Time Cognitive Wireless Networking Through Deep Learning in Transmission and Reception Communication Paths.'”

    Learn more

    ,
  • Using deep neural networks to model complex wave patterns

    ,

    Researchers have “Developed data-driven models to estimate wave parameters and spectra near the” Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. “To estimate wave parameters and energy spectra near the CBBT, novel composite data-driven models were developed using the wind, water level, and offshore wave data” were used in “deep neural networks” to model a complex wave environment with relatively low computational resources. Read “Data-driven modeling of Bay-Ocean wave spectra at bridge-tunnel crossing of Chesapeake Bay, USA” and see the full list of authors in Applied Ocean Research.

    Learn more

    , ,
  • ‘Nonspherical Ultrasound Microbubbles’

    “Bioengineering assistant professor Tao Sun recently published his postdoctoral research from the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Brigham and Women’s Hospital on ‘Nonspherical Ultrasound Microbubbles’ in PNAS.”

    Learn more

    ,
  • ‘Mechanical Properties’ paper featured on cover of Advanced Engineering Materials

    Associate professor of mechanical and industrial engineering Yaning Li and co-author Siyao Liu have published a new paper titled “Mechanical Properties of Cochiral and Contrachiral Mechanical Metamaterials Under Different Temperatures,” which was featured on the cover of Advanced Engineering Materials, March 2023. From the abstract: “Cochiral and contrachiral mechanical metamaterials are designed by introducing chiral cells with different handedness to the center of the basic chiral cell. Both single-material designs and multimaterial designs are explored. The designs are fabricated via a multimaterial 3D printer, and uniaxial tension experiments are performed in a thermal chamber at two different temperatures.”

    Learn more

    , ,
  • ‘Erasing Concepts From Diffusion Models’

    “Motivated by recent advancements in text-to-image diffusion, we study erasure of specific concepts from the model’s weights. While Stable Diffusion has shown promise in producing explicit or realistic artwork, it has raised concerns regarding its potential for misuse. We propose a fine-tuning method that can erase a visual concept from a pre-trained diffusion model, given only the name of the style and using negative guidance as a teacher.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors in ArXiv.

    Learn more

  • Self-reflection encouraged for teachers in ‘My Teaching Routine’

    Mark Martin, assistant professor in computer science and education practice at Northeastern University London, has published a book called “My Teaching Routine.” “This book encourages you to reflect on your teaching style,” the publishing copy reads, “and challenges you to understand when things are going well, when things need change and when they need to be dropped.” A book launch was held on March 15, 2023, over Zoom.

    Learn more

    ,
  • A bellwether of embeddedness: One professor says that ‘the AI system … keeping me alive is ruining my life’

    Professor Laura Forlano writes how an insulin pump AI system, which promised to “dynamically adjust blood sugar when compared to the previous linear system,” has actually required such frequent human-computer interactions as to make it medically detrimental. “Rather than dismiss this particular system as bad engineering,” she argues, “it’s more useful to think of it as a bellwether for a world in which autonomous systems are likely to be increasingly embedded in everyday life.” Read “When Things Go Beep in the Night: The AI system that is keeping me alive is ruining my life” at Data & Society: Points.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Maheswaran elected to American Society for Engineering Education Board of Directors

    “First Year Engineering Program teaching professor Bala Maheswaran was elected as the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Zone 1 Chair and to the ASEE Board of Directors in a nationwide vote in the 2023 ASEE election. … He begins his term at the end of June 2023 and will continue for three years.”

    Learn more

    ,
  • ‘The Paradox of Adaptive Trait Clines With Nonclinal Patterns in the Underlying Genes’

    “Multivariate climate change presents an urgent need to understand how species adapt to complex environments. Population genetic theory predicts that loci under selection will form monotonic allele frequency clines with their selective environment, which has led to the wide use of genotype–environment associations (GEAs). This study used a set of simulations to elucidate the conditions under which allele frequency clines are more or less likely to evolve as multiple quantitative traits adapt to multivariate environments.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors in PNAS.

    Learn more

    ,
  • Robots can ‘see, smell, hear and perceive touch’

    “Electrical and computer engineering professor Ravinder Dahiya has published a book on ‘Sensory Systems for Robotic Applications.’ Topics covered in this edited book,” the abstract reads, “include various types of sensors used in robotics, sensing schemes (e-skin, tactile skin, e-nose, neuromorphic vision and touch), sensing technologies and their applications including healthcare, prosthetics, robotics and wearables.” Read more about the book, and find the full abstract, at the publisher’s page.

    Learn more

    ,