In the Media Archive - Page 3 of 849 - News @ Northeastern

  • Mexico has refused to close its borders during the covid-19 pandemic. Does that make sense?

    The Washington Post -- 01/12/2022

    Alessandro Vespignani, a physicist at Northeastern University, was a co-author of that study. “Before the [coronavirus] pandemic, the mainstream thinking was, okay, travel restrictions do not have an effect,” he said.

  • Checking Privilege in the Animal Kingdom

    The New York Times -- 01/11/2022

    Jennifer Smith, a behavioral ecologist at Mills College in Oakland, Calif., said the idea for the paper arose early in the pandemic, in conversations that she and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles, had over (of course) Zoom. They saw how Covid-19 was highlighting health disparities and other inequalities around the world. The scientists began to wonder if they could learn more about inequality by studying it in animals.

  • As gun ownership rose during the pandemic, take a look at Illinois’ numbers

    The Telegraph -- 01/10/2022

    An estimated 7.5 million U.S. adults became new gun owners over a recent 28-month span, sharply increasing the prospects for home accidents or people taking their own lives, according to research by Matt Miller, a professor of health sciences and epidemiology at Northeastern University in Boston.

  • Demand for COVID-19 testing remains high in Massachusetts

    WCVB TV -- 01/10/2022

    An associate dean at Northeastern University who runs a COVID-19 testing program questions whether the scramble to get tested is really necessary, especially as people face long waits in the cold.

  • How to do science journalism – and do it right

    Al Jazeera -- 01/10/2022

    Storybench, a collaboration between Northeastern University’s School of Journalism and Esquire Magazine, assesses and offers information on digital journalism, from data visualization projects to interactive documentaries.

  • Omicron may be less severe than Delta, but it could hit the global economy even harder in 4 painful ways

    Fortune -- 01/10/2022

    “Omicron was fast and furious in its growth and will be fast—hopefully not furious—but very fast also in its decline,” Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University and a specialist in data science and computational epidemiology, predicted last week. “It should be receding sooner than other waves that we experienced in the past.”…

  • Ground Beef Recalled Due to Possible E. coli Contamination—Here’s Which Products Are Affected

    Health Magazine -- 01/10/2022

    “The most vulnerable population includes the very young, elderly, pregnant women, and those with weakened immune systems,” Darin Detwiler, associate professor of food safety at Northeastern University, tells Health. “However, people of all ages and health status can be severely affected.”…

  • Changes to lung cancer screening increase eligibility for Black women by 50 percent, study says

    The Hill -- 01/10/2022

    New lung cancer screening guidelines rolled out last year have increased the eligibility of Black women by 50 percent, according to researchers from Boston University, Northeastern University and the University of California, Berkeley.  …

  • Changes to lung cancer screening increase eligibility for Black women by 50 percent, study says

    The Hill -- 01/07/2022

    New lung cancer screening guidelines rolled out last year have increased the eligibility of Black women by 50 percent, according to researchers from Boston University, Northeastern University and the University of California, Berkeley.  …

  • Biden’s Vaccine Mandates Could Be In Trouble At The Supreme Court

    FiveThirtyEight -- 01/07/2022

    “​​If you do the counting, the partisanship of the outcomes is disturbingly predictable,” said Wendy Parmet, a health law professor at Northeastern University. “You have basically all Democratic appointees upholding [the vaccine mandates]. And almost all of them are being struck down by Republican appointees.” The implications of these cases, she said, could extend far beyond this pandemic, too, with the potential to significantly limit the government’s ability to quickly respond to health care crises in the future.