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Topic

  • Need a new CEO? Should you hire or promote?

    Associate professor John Bai, in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business, writing with Anya Mkrtchyan from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, uses “rich microdata” from the United States Census Bureau to examine the “relative performance” of new CEOs within a company, comparing CEOs promoted internally with those who are hired externally. Ultimately, their findings “suggest that inside successors might benefit from adopting an outside perspective, demonstrating a sensitivity to change, and challenging legacies and relationships that might diminish their effectiveness.” Read “What Do Outside CEOs Really Do? Evidence from Plant-Level Data” at the Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance.

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  • Oakes receives ASME 2023 Y.C. Fung Early Career Award for work on respiratory mechanics

    “Assistant Professor Jessica Oakes was selected as the 2023 Y.C. Fung Early Career Award Medalist for outstanding work in respiratory mechanics that has significantly advanced the understanding of asthma, smoking and inhalable drug delivery, and for strong advocacy in diversity, equity and inclusion efforts.”

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  • Breaking through the COVID-19 virus’ shell

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    A result of a collaboration between labs in Northeastern University’s departments of physics and chemistry, this paper expands on our understanding of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Using optical tweezers, researchers gained “direct measurements” of the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein, the “N” protein. These new observations on the virus’s binding process set the stage for future attempts at disrupting the process entirely, targeting the nucleocapsid protein and striking at the virus’s interior. See the full list of authors and read their research, “Structural domains of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein coordinate to compact long nucleic acid substrates,” in Nucleic Acids Research.

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  • Restuccia receives Young Investigator Award for work increasing the performance of wireless systems

    “Francesco Restuccia, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering and member of Northeastern’s Institute for the Wireless Internet of Things and the Roux Institute received, in December of 2022, an Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Program Award to examine the algorithmic foundations and theoretical performance bounds of the dynamic, data-driven wireless systems of the future.”

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  • Phonological knowledge shared by signers and non-signers

    In this article, professor of psychology Iris Berent, with professor Judit Gervain from the University of Padua and Université Paris Cité, argues that the knowledge of sign language and of a non-sign language can mutually inform one another. “Informed by recent findings from adults and infants,” they write, “we argue that the phonological system is partly amodal. We show that hearing infants use a shared brain network to extract phonological rules from speech and sign.” Read this discussion paper, “Speakers aren’t blank slates (with respect to sign-language phonology)!” in Cognition.

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  • D’Amore-McKim professors offer framework for digitally transforming businesses

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    Four professors in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business—Koen Pauwels, Zeynep Aksehirli, Yakov Bart and Kwong Chan—have published “Break the Wall: Democratize Digital In Your Business,” which examines issues facing businesses undergoing digital transformation. The authors have identified a fundamental problem: that “many [organizations] take a very narrow view” toward digital transformation, Pauwels writes in a LinkedIn post, while their “leaders recognize the tidal wave of digital change, with the C-Suite… focused on much larger issues.” To combat this differential, the authors propose a “Nested Adaptive Framework to work through digital transformation tasks at each level in the organization.”

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  • Levendis made associate fellow of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    “Yiannis Levendis, Distinguished Professor of mechanical and industrial engineering, was selected as a member of the Class of 2023 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Associate Fellows for his technical contributions to fuel combustion physics, chemistry, and diagnostics, and for educating engineering students in the fields of gas turbine combustion and air pollution.”

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  • Gupta delivers supply chains keynote at ICOFT2022

    “Professor Surendra M. Gupta delivered a keynote speech titled ‘Academic Research in Reverse Supply Chains, Disassembly and Remanufacturing: A Comprehensive Overview’ at the third International Conference on Future Technologies in Manufacturing, Automation, Design & Energy (ICoFT2022) organized by NIT Puducherry, Karaikal, India. Reverse supply chain consists of a series of activities required to collect used products from consumers and reprocess them to either recover their leftover market values or dispose of them. Disassembly and Remanufacturing are important elements of reverse supply chains.”

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  • ‘Optimal Recursive Expert-Enabled Inference in Regulatory Networks’

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    “Accurate inference of biological systems, such as gene regulatory networks and microbial communities, is a key to a deep understanding of their underlying mechanisms. Despite several advances in the inference of regulatory networks in recent years, the existing techniques cannot incorporate expert knowledge into the inference process. … This letter models the regulatory networks using Boolean network with perturbation. We develop an expert-enabled inference method for inferring the unknown parameters of the network model using expert-acquired data.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics.

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  • Wireless internet of things research leads to first prize at IEEE Advanced Air Mobility challenge

    “A team of researchers with the Institute for the Wireless Internet of Things (WIoT) consisting of computer engineering students Matteo Bordin, PhD’26, and Pietro Brach Del Prever, PhD’27, and led by electrical and computer engineering research assistant professor Salvatore D’Oro, won first prize at the IEEE Advanced Air Mobility – Concepts Innovation Challenge, a challenge to engage undergraduate and graduate students across the world in developing novel concepts in unmanned air transportation.”

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  • ‘Towards a Unified Drag Coefficient Formula for Quantifying Wave Energy Reduction by Salt Marshes’

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    “Coastal regions are susceptible to increasing flood risks amid climate change. Coastal wetlands play an important role in mitigating coastal hazards. Vegetation exerts a drag force to the flow and dampens storm surges and wind waves…. As wave height increases, highly flexible vegetation causes reduced wave attenuation, whereas relatively rigid vegetation induces increased wave attenuation. The leaf contribution to wave attenuation is highly dependent on the leaf rigidity. It is recommended that leaf properties, especially its Young’s modulus be collected in future field experiments.” Read the paper and see the full list of authors in Coastal Engineering.

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  • ‘Combining Rules and Discretion in Economic Development Policy’

    “We evaluate the effects of one of a new generation of economic development programs, the California Competes Tax Credit (CCTC), on local job creation. Incorporating perceived best practices from previous initiatives, the CCTC combines explicit eligibility thresholds with some discretion on the part of program officials. … The structure and implementation of the program facilitates rigorous evaluation. We exploit detailed data on accepted and rejected applicants.” Find “Combining rules and discretion in economic development policy: Evidence on the impacts of the California Competes Tax Credit” and the full list of authors in the Journal of Public Economics.

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  • The door doesn’t close on learning: Dean Hazel Sive receives honorary doctorate

    Dean of the College of Science and professor of biology Hazel Sive was awarded an honorary doctorate of engineering from her alma mater, the University of the Witwatersrand (lovingly known as “Wits”) earlier this month, in Johannesburg, South Africa. Sive began her scientific career at Wits when a professor, Robin Crewe, gave her a unique assignment.

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  • Vincent Harris elected as NAI Fellow for ‘facilitating outstanding inventions’

    “Vincent Harris, University Distinguished and William Lincoln Smith Professor, electrical and computer engineering, has been named a 2022 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Harris was chosen for selection for ‘having demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on the quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.'”

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  • A virtual home for Antarctic samples around the world

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    Antarctica provides a remarkable source of biodiversity and serve as “a major sink” of human-made carbon emissions. In “The Time is Right for an Antarctic Biorepository Network,” the authors, from numerous institutions around the United States, argue that there is “an extensive, largely untapped wealth of Antarctic specimens” around the world. “The majority of Antarctic biological specimens are invisible and inaccessible.” With a virtual “biorepository network of Antarctic specimens,” scientists could better address “the most critical questions in Antarctic science, [including] improving human welfare, and mitigating the impacts of climate change.” Find the paper and the full list of authors…

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  • Tiwari receives Editorial Excellence Award for ‘exceptional contributions’

    Associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, Devesh Tiwari has received the Editorial Excellence Award from the IEEE journal Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems (TPDS). The award “recognizes exceptional contributions by members of the TPDS editorial board,” according to their website. Read more about Tiwari’s award at the College of Engineering.

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  • Trailblazer award to engineer our way to smarter gut health

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    “Researchers at the College of Engineering have won a Trailblazer Award from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) for their interdisciplinary work to cure or improve diseases by modulating microbial metabolism in the gut. The funding provides $628,000 for the team’s research over three years.”

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  • ‘Leveraging Structure for Improved Classification of Grouped Biased Data’

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    “We consider semi-supervised binary classification for applications in which data points are naturally grouped (e.g., survey responses grouped by state) and the labeled data is biased (e.g., survey respondents are not representative of the population). The groups overlap in the feature space and consequently the input-output patterns are related across the groups. To model the inherent structure in such data, we assume the partition-projected class-conditional invariance across groups, defined in terms of the group-agnostic feature space.” Find the paper and the full list of authors at ArXiv.

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  • Quantifying ‘race’ in translingual scholarship

    Qianqian Zhang-Wu, assistant professor of english and director of multilingual writing, with Cherice Jones, PhD. student in the department of english, “quantify, contextualize and investigate race in translingual scholarship.” Using data analysis methods like—n-grams, collocation and concordance—on “five of the high-impact journals in the field,” they track the frequency of discussions of race and its proximity to additional topics like intersectionality and power relations. Read their article, “Anti-racist translingualism: investigating race in translingual scholarship in US Writing and rhetoric studies over the past decade,” in the International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

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  • Yanzhi Wang receives Distinguished Industrial Leader Award

    “Associate Professor Yanzhi Wang received the Asia Pacific Signal and Information Processing Association (APSIPA) Distinguished Industrial Leader award at the APSIPA Annual Summit and Conference 2022 held in November 2022.”

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  • Purnima Ratilal-Makris wins $1.28 million NSF grant for hydrophone array

    “Professor Purnima Ratilal-Makris was awarded a $1.28M National Science Foundation grant for “Large-aperture 160-element coherent hydrophone array system upgrades and operational readiness testing for real-time continental-shelf scale ocean acoustic monitoring.” Research on the array system will be conducted in her Laboratory for Ocean Acoustics and Ecosystem Sensing.”

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  • Professor Yi Zheng receives Massachusetts recognition for sustainability and clean technology

    “Professor Yi Zheng was recognized by the Massachusetts House of Representatives for his ‘Outstanding Contributions to Sustainability and Clean Technology.’ Zheng is devoted to clean energy education, research and business, to provide climate-friendly, energy-saving solutions and reduce carbon emissions globally.”

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  • Adaptable, reusable tooling for lightweight automotive components

    “Associate professor of mechanical and industrial engineering Hongli (Julie) Zhu was awarded a $220,000 Department of Energy grant, in collaboration with the University of Delaware, for the manufacturing of lightweight automotive components. The Zhu Lab will synthesize functional thermal conductive material as filler in the composite. In her lab, thermally conductive material will be prepared and added to thermoset resin to increase thermal conductivity and improve curing kinetics of resin during tool manufacturing.”

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  • Wearable gas sensor for disease detection

    “Associate Professor Hongli (Julie) Zhu, in collaboration with Vox Biomedical, LLC, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, was awarded a $154,000 grant for biosensors. Zhu ‘seek[s] to translate detection of… [volatile organic compound] signatures to a more robust and standardized platform, readily adaptable for the identification of a variety of human diseases with distinct pathophysiologies.'”

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  • Karim elected to board of Strategic Management Society

    Professor of entrepreneurship and innovation, Samina Karim, in Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business, has been elected to a director-at-large position in the Strategic Management Society. The society publishes three academic journals, hosts several conferences each year, and funds “projects to advance the field of strategic management,” according to their website. Karim will serve a three-year term, from 2023-2025.

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  • ‘Calibration of Computational Tools for Missense Variant Pathogenicity Classification’

    “Recommendations from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology for interpreting sequence variants specify the use of computational predictors as ‘supporting’ level of evidence for pathogenicity. … Previously, we described a probabilistic framework that quantified the strengths of evidence … within ACMG/AMP recommendations. We have extended this framework to computational predictors and introduce a new standard that converts a tool’s scores to PP3 and BP4 evidence strengths.” Read “Calibration of computational tools for missense variant pathogenicity classification and ClinGen recommendations for PP3/BP4 criteria” and see the full list of authors in AJHG.

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  • ‘The Birth of a Relativistic Jet Following the Disruption of a Star by a Cosmological Black Hole’

    This highly collaborative, multi-institutional effort models black holes when they become relativistic jets “after… tidally disrupt[ing] a star.” These events, when they point toward Earth, “have the potential to unveil cosmological… quiescent black holes and are ideal test beds.” The results of their modeling “implies a beamed, highly relativistic jet akin to blazars… and challenges our theoretical understanding of jets.” Find the paper and the full list of authors at Nature Astronomy.

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  • How to keep houses warm while reducing emissions

    Joan Fitzgerald, professor of public policy and urban affairs, argues that “Reaching the goals of the Massachusetts clean energy and climate bill… will require a massive shift from heating our homes with gas and oil to electric heat pumps that do both heating and cooling.” Fitzgerald details some of the problems that average homeowners experience when they face the prospect of shifting to heat pumps, describes the costs and involved, and reiterates the importance of moving to more carbon-efficient heating units.

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  • Why fishers distrust what the science says when it comes to protecting fish stocks

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    In collaboration with the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, this paper looks at why “Fishers commonly disagree with stock assessment results, particularly when a stock declines and strict harvest controls become necessary.” This counterintuitive effect, which leads to “distrust in scientific advice,” was explored through “a scientific-industry cooperative trawl survey and a telephone survey of fisher perceptions.” Read “Lost in Translation: Understanding Divergent Perspectives on a Depleted Fish Stock” and see the full list of authors in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

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  • Sock puppets recite Russian bots in performance piece

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    “Northeastern Art + Design professors Derek Curry and Jennifer Gradecki have been selected as one of five artist groups to participate in the MediaFutures support program,” writes the College of Arts, Media and Design, “part of the European Commisssion’s S+T+ARTS (Science +Technology + Arts) program for social and technical innovation. The program provides €25,000 for the initial build phase and more for a final exhibition. …Curry and Gradecki’s project, Sock Puppet Theater, is a performance of animatronic sock puppets speaking the words of social media posts by accounts known to be fake and engaging in disinformation campaigns.”

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