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Topic

  • ‘The Birth of a Relativistic Jet Following the Disruption of a Star by a Cosmological Black Hole’

    This highly collaborative, multi-institutional effort models black holes when they become relativistic jets “after… tidally disrupt[ing] a star.” These events, when they point toward Earth, “have the potential to unveil cosmological… quiescent black holes and are ideal test beds.” The results of their modeling “implies a beamed, highly relativistic jet akin to blazars… and challenges our theoretical understanding of jets.” Find the paper and the full list of authors at Nature Astronomy.

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  • How to keep houses warm while reducing emissions

    Joan Fitzgerald, professor of public policy and urban affairs, argues that “Reaching the goals of the Massachusetts clean energy and climate bill… will require a massive shift from heating our homes with gas and oil to electric heat pumps that do both heating and cooling.” Fitzgerald details some of the problems that average homeowners experience when they face the prospect of shifting to heat pumps, describes the costs and involved, and reiterates the importance of moving to more carbon-efficient heating units.

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  • Why fishers distrust what the science says when it comes to protecting fish stocks

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    In collaboration with the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, this paper looks at why “Fishers commonly disagree with stock assessment results, particularly when a stock declines and strict harvest controls become necessary.” This counterintuitive effect, which leads to “distrust in scientific advice,” was explored through “a scientific-industry cooperative trawl survey and a telephone survey of fisher perceptions.” Read “Lost in Translation: Understanding Divergent Perspectives on a Depleted Fish Stock” and see the full list of authors in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

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  • Sock puppets recite Russian bots in performance piece

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    “Northeastern Art + Design professors Derek Curry and Jennifer Gradecki have been selected as one of five artist groups to participate in the MediaFutures support program,” writes the College of Arts, Media and Design, “part of the European Commisssion’s S+T+ARTS (Science +Technology + Arts) program for social and technical innovation. The program provides €25,000 for the initial build phase and more for a final exhibition. …Curry and Gradecki’s project, Sock Puppet Theater, is a performance of animatronic sock puppets speaking the words of social media posts by accounts known to be fake and engaging in disinformation campaigns.”

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  • Story map demonstrates how to rebuild Massachusetts cod stocks

    Professor of marine and environmental science Jon Grabowski, along with recent Northeastern PhD. Micah Dean, have had their research featured in an interactive story map from the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (MADMF). The MADMF coordinated surveys and studies across the fisheries, employing both scientists and commercial fishermen. Their work is “already being applied at multiple levels to improve fishery management and stock assessments.”

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  • Laura Lewis elevated to IEEE Fellow for ‘magneto-functional materials’ research

    “Distinguished University and Cabot Professor Laura Lewis was elevated to an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellow for contributions to the design of magneto-functional materials. IEEE Fellow is a distinction reserved for select IEEE members whose extraordinary accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest are deemed fitting of this prestigious grade elevation and is awarded to less than 0.1% of voting members annually.”

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  • Maheswaran appointed director of Engineering and Architectural Division, Athens Institute for Education and Research

    “Teaching Professor Bala Maheswaran was appointed as the Director of the Engineering and Architectural Division (EAD) of the Athens Institute for Education and Research (ATINER). The EAD includes Architecture, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Transportation Engineering Units, with leaders from various international institutes leading each unit. The division organizes multiple conferences in Athens, Greece, each year in multiple fields.”

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  • Whiteness and the overdisciplining of BIPOC students

    Mills College Department Chair of Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Natalee Kēhaulani Bauer’s book “Tender Violence in US Schools: Benevolent Whiteness and the Dangers of Heroic White Womanhood” challenges perceptions that “the over-disciplining of Black and Indigenous students is… a problem located within pathologized or misunderstood communities.” Instead, she argues that standards of education in the United States arise out of a racist framework. She examines “how white women (the majority of US teachers) have historically understood their roles in the disciplining of Black and Indigenous students,” and how these roles came to support of the white settler colonial state.

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  • Michele Polese receives 2022 ISSNAF Young Investigator Award for Computer Science

    “Principal Research Scientist Michele Polese received the Mario Gerla award for research in computer science at the Italian Scientists and Scholars in North America Foundation (ISSNAF) Young Investigators Award ceremony. Polese designs and optimizes next-generation wireless spectrum systems.”

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  • Northeastern co-hosts 28th IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics and Machine Vision in Practice

    “The 28th IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics and Machine Vision in Practice (M2VIP) was held at Northeastern University from November 16th to 18th, 2022. The conference, co-organized by Professor Yingzi Lin, mechanical and industrial engineering, Northeastern University, and Professor Zhisheng Zhang, Southeast University (China), aims to provide an interdisciplinary, international forum for mechatronics and machine vision. The conference topics include applied robots, smart sensors, artificial intelligence, machine vision, and the frontier of science and technology in medical rehabilitation electromechanical systems and other aspects.”

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  • Emerging countries and the global legal economic order

    “Emerging countries have been able to make use of the liberal trade and investment regime to support their development strategies without having to adopt the full gamut of neoliberal prescriptions… Recent research explores how different emerging countries are positioned in regards to trade and investment law, how tensions develop between development policies and the demands of trade and investment legal frameworks, and how alternative visions will be driven by pragmatism and strategic self-interest rather than neoliberal orthodoxy.” Read “Reshaping the Global Legal Economic Order” in the Insights @ Center for Emerging Markets.

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  • Illustrated activism: Celebrating ‘the daily lives of Black folks’

    In the book “Living While Black: Portraits of Everyday Resistance,” professor of African American literature Ajuan Mance presents illustrated scenes of Black folks as they go about their daily lives. The book “celebrates the small acts of resistance” that arise out of daily living, and displays the “many ways to be an activist.” The book also contains a foreword by Black Lives Matter founder Alicia Garza.

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  • Arthur Coury wins ACS Bioelastomer Award

    “University Distinguished Professor Art Coury has won the American Chemical Society Rubber Division’s Bioelastomer Award for 2023, which honors significant contributions to the advancement of biomaterials in the field of rubber science and technology.”

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  • Ruobing Bai receives 2022 EML Young Investigator Award

    “Assistant Professor Ruobing Bai is a recipient of the 2022 Extreme Mechanics Letters (EML) Young Investigator Award for his paper ‘Temperature-modulated photomechanical actuation of photoactive liquid crystal elastomers.’ The EML Young Investigator Award honors the best young researchers who have published their highly impactful papers in the EML journal.”

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  • Professor Yun Raymond Fu awarded patent for ‘Multi-Person Pose Estimation Using Skeleton Prediction’

    The patent offers “Embodiments [that] provide functionality for identifying joints and limbs in images.”

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  • ‘Manipulating Polydispersity of Lens β-Crystallins Using Divalent Cations Demonstrates Evidence of Calcium Regulation’

    “Of the three most common vertebrate subtypes, β-crystallins exhibit the widest degree of polydispersity … [and] it is unclear why there is such a high degree of structural complexity within the β-crystallin subtype. … While the direct, physiological relevance of these divalent cations in the lens is still under investigation, our results support that specific isoforms of β-crystallin modulate polydispersity through multiple chemical equilibria and that this native state is disrupted by cation binding.” Read the paper and find the full list of authors in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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  • Topology, symmetry and quantum band theory

    In this review, “Topology and Symmetry in Quantum Materials,” the authors present an overview of “band theory,” and “presents a cross section through the recent work on understanding the role of geometry and topology in generating topological states and their responses to external stimuli, and as a basis for connecting theory and experiment within the band theory framework.” Find the paper and the full list of authors at Advanced Materials.

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  • Rotating shapes with the mind: Perspectives from psychology and philosophy

    Northeastern University professor of psychology and philosophy Jorge Morales, along with frequent collaborator Chaz Firestone of Johns Hopkins University, provide a review of new research conducted by E.E.M. Stewart, et al., “Mental object rotation based on two-dimensional visual representations.” This paper, they say, describes how “a core assumption” about spacial thinking “has missed something important about the perceiver’s point-of-view.” Read their review, “Visual cognition: A new perspective on mental rotation,” in Current Biology.

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  • Modeling floodplain lakes after extreme flooding

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    This study of floodplain lakes—which accumulate “sediments, organic matter, and pollutants”—adds to our understanding of their evolution, especially after flooding events. While pre-existing models of floodplain lake evolution exist, they are “not well suited to guide the interpretation of individual flood events in sedimentary records.” This paper “combine[s] sediment samples collected in and around a floodplain lake with hydraulic modelling simulations to examine inundation, flow velocity, and sedimentation patterns,” especially helpful after “extreme” flood events. Read “A Hydraulic Modelling Approach to Study Flood Sediment Deposition in Floodplain Lakes” and find the full list of authors in Earth Surface Processes and…

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  • Why was ‘Maus’ banned?

    In response to a Tennessee ban on Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel “Maus,” professor of English and art + design Hillary Chute has authored a new article in The Atlantic, “Why Maus was banned: What makes the book controversial is exactly what makes it valuable.” The article (behind a paywall) goes into what makes the graphic novel, about Spiegelman’s father’s experience of the holocaust, both provocative and important. Chute previously edited “Maus Now,” a collection of critical writings on the graphic novel.

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  • ‘Quench Dynamics in the One-Dimensional Mass-Imbalanced Ionic Hubbard Model’

    “Using the time-dependent Lanczos method, we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of the one-dimensional ionic-mass imbalanced Hubbard chain driven by a quantum quench of the on-site Coulomb interaction, where the system is prepared in the ground state of the Hamiltonian with a different Hubbard interaction. A full exact diagonalization is adopted to study the zero temperature phase diagram in equilibrium, which is shown to be in good agreement with previous studies using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG).” See the full list of authors and read their research in ArXiv.

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  • Music is good for the brain, and not just among professionals

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    This study, “Musical Experience Relates to Insula-Based Functional Connectivity in Older Adults,” a collaboration between the department of physical therapy, the department of music and the department of psychology at Northeastern University, in addition to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, looked at “general musical experiences” across a subject’s lifespan, particularly in older adults. Their findings show that “older adults with more musical experience showed greater functional connectivity” between insulae and various regions of the brain. “Sensorimotor function and cognitive control” especially seem to benefit. See the full list of authors and read their research in Brain Sciences.

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  • Advances made against trypanosomiasis, ‘sleeping sickness’

    Researchers compared the perturbations of proteins in response to two treatments to human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness. The workflow identified the differences between NEU-4438 (“a lead for the development of drugs against Trypanosoma brucei,” the parasite responsible for sleeping sickness) and acoziborole, a more common treatment. See the full list of authors and read their research paper at iScience: “Hypothesis-generating proteome perturbation to identify NEU-4438 and acoziborole modes of action in the African Trypanosome.”

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  • Photography for the past and present at San Francisco subway station

    Mills photography professor Catherine Wagner installation “Arc Cycle” was on display at the Yerba Buena/Moscone Subway Station in San Francisco. The work “aims to reflect San Francisco’s past and present.” Professor Wagner was interviewed about the installation in the San Francisco Chronicle Datebook.

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  • Christie Chung speaks to undergraduates at Psychonomic Conference

    Christie Chung spoke at the Advancing Cognitive Research with Undergraduates (ACRU) event at the Psychonomic Conference in Boston, Mass., on November 18, 2022.

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  • Eduardo Sontag wins IFAC Technical Committee Award

    “University Distinguished Professor Eduardo Sontag received the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) Technical Committee Award on Non-Linear Control Systems, which is described as the ‘highest distinction on nonlinear control systems research.'”

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  • Josep Jornet is 2022 IEEE WTC Outstanding Young Researcher

    “Associate Professor Josep Jornet received the 2022 IEEE WTC Outstanding Young Researcher Award for his pioneering contributions to the field of terahertz communications. Jornet’s contributions range from terahertz array architectures and propagation channel models to physical and link layer solutions for ultra-broadband and ultra-directional networks operating at frequencies above 100 GHz. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and multiple patents.”

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  • ‘Public Investment in Hazard Mitigation: Effectiveness and the Role of Community Diversity’

    In his abstract, professor Ivan Petkov writes, “I estimate the loss-reducing effect of local public investments against natural hazards with new measures of damages, weather risk, and spending for a panel of 904 US coastal counties in 2000-2020. I distinguish federally- and county-funded projects and rely on a quasi-experimental strategy, matching counties by economic development, population, and weather risk. Risk predictions come from the Random Forest learning algorithm, using granular data on resident vulnerability and severe weather frequency.”

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  • Why only ‘six’ degrees of separation?

    This preprint interrogates the concept of “six degrees of separation,” which postulates that, within a social network, no one person is removed from any other by more than six steps. But is this the case? And if so, mathematically, why would this hold true? The authors propose that “six degrees of separation” constitutes the “equilibrium state of any network where individuals weigh between their aspiration to improve their centrality and the costs incurred in forming and maintaining connections.” See the full list of authors and read their research, “Why are there six degrees of separation in a social network?” at…

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  • Therese Pirozzi receives grant for ‘Active Brain, Healthy Brain Exercise Program’

    “Therese Pirozzi, associate professor in Bouvé College’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, is a practicing speech-language pathologist with a focus on language and health literacy of low-income families, neuroplasticity of the brain, and the effects of brain injury on survivors and their families. Over the summer, she received a grant for the ‘Active Brain, Healthy Brain Exercise Program’ from the Community Endowment of Lexington—an endowed fund of the Foundation for MetroWest.”

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