In the Media

  • More women now breadwinners for families

    The Boston Globe -- 02/19/2013

    More educated men, on the other hand, tend to marry educated women, and these couples’ earnings took less of a beating during the downturn, further widening gap between the highest and lowest incomes, said Andrew Sum, director of Northeastern University’s Center for Labor Market Studies. “At the bottom, women’s share is going up largely because men’s earning are going down,” he said. “At the top, wives are both working more and earning more relative to their husbands, but their husbands’ earnings are not declining.”…

  • College courses enlighten family businesses

    USA Today -- 02/19/2013

    Similar undergraduate courses have been sprouting up on campuses nationwide lately, often riding the coattails of popular new entrepreneurship majors. New York University this spring for the first time is offering an undergrad course on the topic. Savannah State University in Georgia plans to introduce such a class next year. Boston’s Northeastern University launched a course in 2011. A few schools, including The University of St. Thomas in St. Paul and Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, have created family business majors in the last few years.

  • Criminologist: Mass Shooters Typically Aim To Top Previous Death Tolls To ‘Become Infamous’

    CBS News -- 02/19/2013

    Criminologist Jack Levin at Northeastern University said Lanza’s isolation and a possible rivalry with other mass killers are characteristics that the Sandy Hook gunman shares with other shooters. “It is not surprising that a school shooter would be inspired to break a record that was left by another school shooter. We’ve seen this happen at Columbine, a massacre that inspired killers all over the world – in Finland, in Germany, in Brazil, Australia, Canada and the United States,” Levin told WCBS 880′s Paul Murnane. “They want to capture the attention of the world. They want desperately to become infamous and that’s why they talk about setting records, amassing large body counts.”…

  • U.S. Banks Bigger Than GDP as Accounting Rift Masks Risk

    Bloomberg -- 02/19/2013

    “There are probably some dangerous things left off the balance sheet still, and we’ll only find out what in the next crisis,” said David Sherman, an accounting professor at Northeastern University in Boston. “But how many times do we have to go through this to figure it all out?” After failing to agree on common standards for derivatives netting and consolidation of securitizations, rule-setters are now heading in different directions as they debate how to account for loan-loss reserves.

  • Any Website Just 19 Clicks Away From Any Other, Study Shows

    ABC News -- 02/19/2013

    Although there are currently said to be more than 14 billion pages on the Internet, a new study shows that navigation between any two of these pages should take you no more than 19 clicks — that’s how interrelated everything is. The study was published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society and conducted by Albert-Laszlo Barabasi of Northeastern University’s Center for Complex Network Research in Boston. Barabasi, a leader in network research, says that the 19 clicks of separation have to do with human nature, according to Smithsonian magazine. It works because Internet pages are organized in an interconnected hierarchy of organizational themes, including region, country and subject area.

  • Vermont women earn more than national average

    Times Argus -- 02/19/2013

    More educated men, on the other hand, tend to marry educated women, and these couples’ earnings took less of a beating during the downturn, further widening gap between the highest and lowest incomes, said Andrew Sum, director of Northeastern University’s Center for Labor Market Studies. “At the bottom, women’s share is going up largely because men’s earning are going down,” he said. “At the top, wives are both working more and earning more relative to their husbands, but their husbands’ earnings are not declining.”…

  • Is “Feminist” A Sexist Word?

    Inside Higher Ed -- 02/18/2013

    Whenever I teach an introductory lesson on “gender” in my first-year international affairs and international relations classes, I find myself prefacing my explanation of “feminism” with the familiar “Feminism is not about man-hating. Feminists are concerned with both men and women,” in order to fend off the usual hostile responses from both male and female students. However, it doesn’t wipe the smirk off many of student’s faces in the classroom; I still find myself feeling defensive and exasperated, particularly when combating the well-worn tropes against women in the military, gender quotas in electoral processes, or the idea that women aren’t fit to lead countries because of, well, emotions.  …

  • Police chief son arrested in N.H.

    The Boston Globe -- 02/18/2013

    But Jack Levin, a criminologist at Northeastern University, said that while the decision to drive Davis home may appear worse in light of the arrest, it may well have failed as a wake-up call. “It doesn’t mean this wouldn’t have happened again,” he said. “Being arrested, even serving a prison sentence, it only works if the person has internal control. It has to be something that comes from within.”…

  • Influential Few Predict Behavior of the Many

    Scientific American -- 02/18/2013

    To demonstrate their technique, Yang-Yu Liu of Northeastern University in Boston and his colleagues looked at the entire human metabolic network and found that concentrations of about 10 percent of the body’s 2,763 metabolites could be used to determine the levels of all the rest. But the method could also be used in social networks to identify the people whose opinions determine everyone else’s, helping to predict the outcome of, say, a presidential election. Or it could help ecologists to single out the particular species to track to follow changes in an entire ecosystem, to name just a few potential applications.

  • Should Mass. raise taxes?

    The Boston Globe -- 02/17/2013

    Since 1998, the Commonwealth has reduced personal and corporate income tax rates, costing the state $2.5 billion a year — leaving little to pay current bills or deal with $80 billion in past unfunded liabilities, let alone make critical education and transportation investments for our future. Yet with the public demanding reform before revenue, the governor and Legislature have been hesitant to increase taxes.