In the Media Archive - Page 902 of 904 - News @ Northeastern

  • American job prospects make for dim May Day celebration

    MSNBC -- 05/01/2013

    Nearly 40% of the unemployed have been out of work for 27 weeks or more, and it seems that more and more people are giving up on ever being employed again. Given the current economic climate, they might not be wrong: a recent study by economists from the Boston Federal Reserve and Northeastern University suggests that employers are unlikely to even considerapplicants who have been out of work for over six months.  …

  • Jason Collins’ quiet facilitator

    The Boston Globe -- 05/01/2013

    But, culturally, it matters that Collins is an active player and that he is a man. How will the locker room react? How will fans react? What about endorsements? Collins’s announcement challenges comfortable but homophobic notions about athletic heroes, said Dan Lebowitz, director of the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University. He calls the revelation a civil rights watershed moment. “The sports world is typified by this hyper­masculine definition of manhood that hadn’t allowed for these conversations of an athlete of a different sexual orientation,” Lebowitz said. “I think it creates a positive self-image for every gay kid who is an athlete or every gay kid who isn’t an athlete. They can find people who are like them. “There should be a lot of room for a grand definition of what manhood is. It can be a million things, including being a gay athlete.”…

  • Domestic Terrorism: Myths and Realities

    Huffington Post -- 05/01/2013

    The Boston Marathon bombers have brought a number of important assumptions into the national dialogue concerning the character of domestic terrorism. Unfortunately, the conversation has too often been filled with myths and misconceptions regarding the who, what, where, and why of terrorist activity in the United States. Four of these myths have been especially prominent: MYTH 1: Terrorist attacks have increased dramatically since Sept 11, 2001 — so much so that we have reached a higher plateau where terrorism is the “new normal.” Actually, just the opposite is true. We haven’t experienced such a low level of political terrorism in decades. The number of terrorist incidents in the United States, by the year 2007, was down to eleven. By contrast, there were many more incidents before the 9/11 attack on America — for example, 120 in the year 1975, 43 in 1982, and 48 in 1992.

  • To Keep Surfaces Bacteria-Free, Add Selenium

    Inside Science -- 04/30/2013

    To clear up the bacteria, patients often face further surgery to remove implants, as well as a regimen of antibiotics. But these drugs can fail as microbes mutate and develop resistance. “It’s a huge problem,” said Thomas Webster, a chemical engineer at Northeastern University, in Boston, “which is why we like non-drug solutions — like selenium.” Our bodies naturally contain trace amounts of selenium: it’s a component of several important enzymes. But although small quantities of this element are part of a healthy diet, in large amounts, it can be toxic. And on its own, it can kill both cancer cells and bacteria. As Webster discovered, materials coated with tiny particles of selenium will resist bacterial colonization. In his most recent study, published in the journal Nanotechnology, he pitted selenium-coated polymers against the culprit behind staph infections: the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus.

  • Forbes: Getting Serious About Startups: Northeastern University’s IDEA

    Forbes -- 04/30/2013

    In the age of startup-mania, accelerators, incubators and the constant search for venture capital,Northeastern University is taking a proactive approach to getting would-be founders to an entrepreneurial happy-place. IDEA calls itself a “venture accelerator,” The three-year-old program within the university was founded by students who – after coming face to face with the harsh realities of startup life – felt the school should have a means of cultivating new, student-founded small businesses and getting them ready for prime time. Funded by alumni, the program allows current students and young graduates access to coaches, mentors, service providers and eventually funding to get their ideas off the ground. IDEA meted out just under $215,000 this school year to 17 young ventures. “We have seven funding rounds over the course of the year and normally about five (ventures) that pitch every funding round,” says Christopher Wolfel, CEO of the program and a senior business administration student at Northeastern. Mentors with IDEA are all Northeastern alumni that have been involved in the founding of at least one company, Wolfel explained. They are matched to potential startups based on industry expertise and meet with the programs later stage ventures at least once a month. Student coaches – MBA students or seniors – are also available daily to field questions within specific expertise like sales, marketing, engineering or technical and financial.

  • Fast Company: Northeastern Offers The Nation’s Only Student-Run Venture Accelerator, IDEA

    Fast Company -- 04/30/2013

    College is crazy expensive–and it’s getting more expensive all the time. Entrepreneurs like Peter Thiel are fond of saying it’s not worth it. But 23-year-old Chris Wolfel, who is getting his bachelor’s from Northeastern University this spring, found college to be not only a good investment, but the perfect launching pad for his entrepreneurial dreams. For the last two years, Wolfel has been the CEO of IDEA, the only student-run venture accelerator in the country. Founded in 2009, IDEA offers workshops, meetups, coaching, mentoring, and most importantly, funding, all from alumni donors, for student startups. Wolfel and his team were able to raise $250,000 to help launch almost 300 businesses by students from every school across the university. The eclectic group has spawned Uturn Audio, which created a retro turntable that raised over $245K on Kickstarter; Njabini, a sustainable apparel company based in Kenya; Tuatara, an e-textbook platform; Pure Pest Management, an organic pest control company now operating in six states; and Mini Pops, a snack food featured in Oprah’s “Favorite Things.”…

  • Potential psychological explanations behind bombings

    The Boston Globe -- 04/29/2013

    Shared paranoid disorder might also explain why the two brothers did not initially plan for a quick getaway after the bombing. “They might have fantasized that God would take care of them,” Bursztajn said, and enable them to escape being identified as the bombers. Or they might simply have been careless in their planning. The psychiatric condition, however, is uncommon, and a far more plausible scenario is that the brothers were emboldened by each other. “They may believe that murder is wrong, but their sense of allegiance and loyalty to each other or the group may supersede that sense of right and wrong,” said James Alan Fox, a criminology professor at Northeastern University. “Awful crimes may be committed just for the sake of a perverted kind of bonding,” Fox said. Criminals often compartmentalize, dividing the world into those they care about and everyone else. And just as some men who commit group rape would never rape someone on their own, some people only kill in pairs. One brother may have been looking for his younger brother’s admiration, while the other was looking for his older brother’s approval. “I think they brought out the worst in each other,” Fox said. “I’m not sure either would have committed murder on his own.”…

  • Why Some Colleges Are Saying No to MOOC Deals, at Least for Now

    Chronicle of Higher Education -- 04/29/2013

    “For a while it really felt like a rocket ship, with folks desperate not to be left behind,” says Peter Stokes, executive director of postsecondary innovation at Northeastern University’s College of Professional Studies. “I think that phase has passed, and the folks who are starting to do the work are starting to realize that these efforts … have real costs for the institution,” says Mr. Stokes. “And I think that’s creating a little bit more sobriety about how folks view the opportunity.”…

  • Potential psychological explanations behind bombings

    The Boston Globe -- 04/29/2013

    The psychiatric condition, however, is uncommon, and a far more plausible scenario is that the brothers were emboldened by each other. “They may believe that murder is wrong, but their sense of allegiance and loyalty to each other or the group may supersede that sense of right and wrong,” said James Alan Fox, a criminology professor at Northeastern University. “Awful crimes may be committed just for the sake of a perverted kind of bonding,” Fox said. Criminals often compartmentalize, dividing the world into those they care about and everyone else. And just as some men who commit group rape would never rape someone on their own, some people only kill in pairs. One brother may have been looking for his younger brother’s admiration, while the other was looking for his older brother’s approval. “I think they brought out the worst in each other,” Fox said. “I’m not sure either would have committed murder on his own.”…

  • Boston bombing reveals a new American maturity toward insecurity

    The Christian Science Monitor -- 04/28/2013

    In that way, Boston has hinted at a new American maturity, say experts. Because of it, the “new normal” post-Boston might not look too different from what came before – a more robust police presence at big events, more surveillance cameras on urban streets perhaps. But like other cities worldwide that have faced the threat of bombings for decades – from London toMadrid to Jerusalem – Boston has made the more profound step of showing that a community’s greatest defense against terrorism is in the determination of its people. “Boston is showing you can take a blow like this, and you can keep going,” says Stephen Flynn, codirector of the George J. Kostas Research Institute for Homeland Security at Northeastern University in Boston. Of course, resolve was in no short supply after 9/11, and the flag planted at ground zero in New York came to symbolize the nation’s determination to move on unbowed. Yet in many ways it could not. September 11 laid bare not only shocking gaps in the US intelligence network, but also the full array of terrorist groups targeting America. Quite simply, America had work to do – and new threats for its residents to process – before it could move on.