In the Media Archive - Page 873 of 887 - News @ Northeastern

  • Higher ed systems in 10 states turn to Coursera

    The Wall Street Journal -- 05/30/2013

    Legislators in Florida and California are pressing to force universities to accept credit from MOOC courses, especially if students can’t get into the in-person versions of the courses they need. Peter Stokes, an expert on education innovation at Northeastern University, said more such efforts will follow — likely to the alarm of some faculty. “It almost seems to promote the notion that there is this no-cost alternative for higher education,” he said. “It feeds into the fear that many public institutions have that the political solution to higher education is to continue to divest.”…

  • Researchers use weightlessness of space to design better materials for Earth

    Phys.org -- 05/29/2013

    Researchers from Northeastern University are among the many scientists helping NASA use the weightlessness of space to design stronger materials here on Earth. Structural alloys might not sound familiar, but they are an integral part of everyday materials, such as aircraft wings, car bodies, engine blocks, or gas pipelines. These materials are produced through solidification—a process similar to the making of ice cubes. “Solidification happens all around us, either naturally, as during the crystallization of familiar snow-flakes in the atmosphere, or in technological processes used to fabricate a host of materials, from the large silicon crystals used for solar panels to the making of almost any man-made object or structure that needs to withstand large forces, like a turbine blade,” said Northeastern University Prof. Alain Karma, who was a collaborator in this study. The transition of a structural alloy from liquid to solid is morphologically unstable, meaning that the interface between solid and liquid evolves from a planar morphology to a non-planar cellular structure during solidification—essentially, the same instability is responsible for the branched star shape of snow flakes.

  • Consumer confidence in U.S. hits five-year high

    The Boston Herald -- 05/29/2013

    The numbers track closely with state figures released earlier this month. “There has been fairly steady job gains … and that has improved incomes of households,” Northeastern University economist Alan Clayton-Matthews said. “The improving housing market also has been a big factor … and that’s improving households’ wealth as well as confidence.” But though the stock market also has boosted retirement savings, he warned, “we’re not totally out of the woods yet.”…

  • Consumer confidence in U.S. hits five-year high

    The Boston Herald -- 05/29/2013

    The numbers track closely with state figures released earlier this month. “There has been fairly steady job gains … and that has improved incomes of households,” Northeastern University economist Alan Clayton-Matthews said. “The improving housing market also has been a big factor … and that’s improving households’ wealth as well as confidence.” But though the stock market also has boosted retirement savings, he warned, “we’re not totally out of the woods yet.”  …

  • Colleges grapple with merit-based aid

    The Boston Globe -- 05/28/2013

    Some colleges, including Northeastern, do consider ability to pay in some of their admissions decisions. BU doesn’t. Officials said it would be presumptuous to deny students the chance to make their own decisions, especially because in some cases, however rare, they may have grandparents who can afford to help or other resources invisible to the financial aid office. BU says it counsels families to avoid heavy borrowing. It is also blunt on its website, presenting a table showing a much greater likelihood of getting financial aid for students with very high class rankings and SAT scores. Many educators wrestle with how to do the right thing. “I need to be able to look myself in the mirror every day,” said Jane B. Brown, vice president for enrollment management at Northeastern, who talked about the imperative to build an educationally rich environment and stretch the school’s funds.

  • On Courage and Difference: Excerpts From Graduation Speeches

    Chronicle of Higher Education -- 05/28/2013

    Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank and former president of Dartmouth College, at Northeastern University: My father spent his childhood in North Korea and, at the age of 19, escaped across the border into South Korea, leaving his parents, his brothers and sisters, his entire extended family—everything he had ever known—behind. He had no money. Still, he managed to enroll in the Seoul National University dental school and became a dentist. He told me stories about how he had so little money he often could afford to buy lunch only from the illegal noodle vendors on the street. Once, when he was eating his contraband ramyun next to the vendor, the police came and chased after the vendors and their customers. But while he ran, my father kept eating his noodles because he knew he wouldn’t be able to afford another bowl…. You see, my father knew all about uncertainty. He knew that it’s impossible to be sure about where you might end up in life. And [later] he worried that his own success might have deprived his children of the opportunity to understand deeply the meaning of running away from the noodle police while, of course, finishing your noodles.  …

  • Lawyers help fill Daniel Conley’s war chest

    The Boston Globe -- 05/28/2013

    “District attorneys often will tap into the local criminal lawyer community, both prosecutors and defense lawyers,” said Daniel S. Medwed, a professor at the Northeastern University School of Law. “It would only rise to a conflict of interest if it seemed like the defense lawyers expected a quid pro quo for the donation.”  …

  • Home values rise in the Boston area

    The Boston Globe -- 05/28/2013

    Barry Bluestone, director of the Kitty and Michael Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, expects steady but moderate price increases for single-family homes in the Boston area over the next few years, as more people put their homes on the market. Bluestone said he expects prices for multifamily homes and condominiums to rise even faster. “Older baby boomers are going to look to downsize and younger professionals will be less interested in moving into the suburbs and having to put up with long, tedious commutes,” he said.  …

  • Ending Violence Against Women Requires a Bigger Role From Men

    Huffington Post -- 05/28/2013

    We are seeing more initiatives focused on facilitating conversation between men and boys on the topic of sexual violence and attitudes — a subject on which men have not been effectively engaged in the past. Jackson Katz, who co-founded Mentors in Violence Prevention at Northeastern University, promotes a grassroots approach to ending gender violence that encourages male leadership and ownership. Organizations like A Call to Men, led by Ted Bunch and his team, work with young men to challenge common notions of ‘manhood.’ A similar initiative from Futures Without Violence, Coaching Boys into Men, trains adult mentors to teach boys respectful attitudes towards girls in youth athletics. Similar opportunities should be expanded at schools, places of worship, and on athletic teams to sensitize boys and young men to gender issues with opportunities for discussion.  …

  • Teachers’ lessons in heroism and healing

    CNN -- 05/27/2013

    In fact, few teachers who witness school violence are offered counseling, said Edward Mooney, a California high school teacher and Northeastern University doctoral student who studies the effect of school violence on teachers. After disturbing events such as a shooting, many teachers struggle with post-traumatic stress. It can be disabling, and made worse by administrators who want to move on, avoid the topic, “basically the treatment of ‘You’ll get over it,’ ” Mooney said. Mooney has taught for more than 20 years, and with every tale of teachers’ heroism – whether Moore, Newtown or events that hardly make national news – he worries about how few resources exist for them. “The teacher feels overwhelming anguish. Those are empathetic, compassionate people,” Mooney said. As he wrote his dissertation, he thought of his own colleagues and especially his students. “‘What if it happened to him? Or her?’ That would shatter me.”…