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Northeastern’s COVID-19 research in the press

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  • Vaccine Refusal May Put Herd Immunity At Risk, Researchers Warn

    “What most of us want is a safe return to something that looks more normal,” says Samuel Scarpino, who models the coronavirus outbreak at Northeastern University. “That to me means 80% to 85%, probably, vaccinated.”…

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  • Northeastern says students must get vaccinated against COVID-19 to come back in the fall

    “All students returning to Northeastern University’s campuses for the Fall 2021 term will be expected to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by the first day of classes,” officials said in an article posted on the university’s website. “This announcement comes as the university advances its plan for a return to full-time, in-person learning in September while supporting the safety of Northeastern’s campuses and broader community.”…

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  • Mass. Employer Confidence Widespread Heading Into Spring

    Employer optimism may be moderated due to the recent Johnson & Johnson vaccine manufacturing problem and the resumption of COVID-19 lockdowns in European countries, according to Nada Sanders, a supply chain management professor at Northeastern University and member of AIM’s Board of Economic Advisers. “There are areas of the supply chain that were woefully unprepared for COVID-19,” Sanders said. “Retailers and suppliers, for example, built a supply chain system that was too complex, in which the slightest crack down the line created a large ripple effect. Companies are now addressing those weaknesses but the events of the past week, including the backup of the Suez Canal, may give employers pause.”…

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  • And so it begins

    “Crazy as it may sound, it’s no longer unusual for potential presidential candidates to test the waters this early,” said William Mayer, a Northeastern University political scientist. “Of course, Pompeo hasn’t yet announced his candidacy, and he may ultimately decide not to run. But I can guarantee you that a number of other Republicans are thinking about running and thinking about various ways to call attention to themselves without formally announcing. If the Iowa or New Hampshire Republican Party needs a speaker for their next major meeting, they’ll have no shortage of eager volunteers.”…

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  • Bill Gates vs The Pandemic: Inside the Gates Foundation fight against the Pandemic

    “A fundamental question is, Well, because you have the money, should you be able to control the architecture of global health?” asks Brook Baker, a North eastern University law professor focused on intellectual property rights and universal access to treatments for HIV/AIDS and COVID-19. “In many people’s minds, the Gates Foundation is playing a bigger role in establishing the foundation of global health than anything else, including the WHO.”…

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  • Businesses are coming back to life in Massachusetts as vaccinated people venture out

    A major threat to the fledging recovery is the hesitancy of many people to get vaccinated, according to Alicia Sasser Modestino, an associate professor of public policy, urban affairs, and economics at Northeastern University. “We are going to hit a wall at some point where the progress on vaccines is going to stall out,” she said.

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  • Is Mass. heading for a third coronavirus surge? These charts show why experts are worried

    “It looks to me like we’re very much entering into another surge,” Northeastern University epidemiologist Samuel Scarpino said this week. At the same time, Scarpino said, this surge may not be as bad as the two previous ones, which hit last spring and last fall. Factors working in our favor include a rising level of vaccinations, especially among older residents and vulnerable populations, and the protection ramping up in the systems of those vaccinated weeks ago, he said.

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  • A 4th COVID-19 Surge May Be Starting. How Bad Could It Get?

    Alessandro Vespignani, a disease modeler at Northeastern University in Boston, warns that relaxing measures like social distancing now could turn this into a bigger surge. Instead, he says, we need more time for the vaccination campaign to roll out. “We really need to keep fighting for a few weeks,” he says. “We see that light at the end of the tunnel and it’s just a matter of keeping things together for a few more weeks. It’s a matter of choice at this point.”…

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  • J&J Confirms One Vaccine Batch Was Discarded, What Does That Mean for Mass.?

    “This is really disturbing,” said Nada Sanders, who teaches supply chain management at Northeastern University. Sanders says think of this like what happened at the Suez Canal, where one major error backs up the flow of J&J vaccines.

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  • How Counterfeit Covid-19 Vaccines And Vaccination Cards Endanger Us All

    Ravi Sundaram, professor of computer science at Northeastern University, went further in an email interview. “The problem is worse than what Javier Guzman says – it is not restricted to malicious mafias and unwilling governments but there is passive connivance from big tech (search, social network, ads, e-commerce) in turning a blind eye to illegal sales so as not to restrict their own revenue spigot.”…

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  • With older Americans largely vaccinated, more new COVID-19 cases among younger adults

    “The rapidly increasing number of COVID-19 cases in teens and young adults is very troubling. Tragically, states — like Massachusetts — ignored the advice of public health officials and re-opened too quickly,” said Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor in the emerging epidemics lab at Northeastern University.

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  • Parents More Skeptical About Vaccines Than The Childless

    These findings of parental skepticism are from research done by top US universities Northeastern, Harvard, Northwestern, and Rutgers. According to their findings, young moms have the least faith in the COVID-19 vaccine. However, distrust among vaccines in general is the highest in this group, but this group does not surpass the group of parent who would vaccinate their children with the COVID vaccine.

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  • Americans’ health may be affected by pandemic weight gain and lack of exercise

    Public health measures meant to contain the pandemic, “have still been extremely destabilizing”, said Rachel Rodgers, associate professor of psychology at Northeastern University. Changes to eating habits could be especially lasting for groups, such as “children, adolescents, and new college students who are transitioning to independent life decisions”, said Rodgers. “Having this happen at that juncture could be really important in their life span.”…

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  • Many accused in the Capitol attack placed their campaign cash on Trump, Republicans

    “It’s yet another indicator of exactly who these rioters were – they were clearly rioters who were supportive of Republican voices in Congress and Donald Trump in particular,” Costas Panagopoulos, professor of political science at Northeastern University, said of the donations.

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  • The Covid-19 Vaccine Effort Is Protecting Older People, Growing Evidence Suggests

    “Let’s just not tempt fate, let’s just get rid of this damned thing,” said Samuel Scarpino, who directs the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University, regarding the pandemic.

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  • These 2 charts highlight the race against time to vaccinate the Mass. population against the coronavirus

    “Absolutely, we should be concerned,” said Northeastern University epidemiologist Sam Scarpino. He attributed the increases both to the arrival of coronavirus variants and to people letting down their guard as Governor Charlie Baker has loosened coronavirus restrictions. “This is exactly the reason that so many of us were saying it was too soon to be relaxing measures.”…

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  • Mass. COVID Numbers Have Stopped Declining. Experts Say They Have An Idea Why

    And that relaxed attitude could lead to another surge, said Sam Scarpino, who directs the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University. “We are so close,” he said. “We’re under a month away from the general availability of vaccines for adults. We’re a month away from consistently good weather … so that we can have windows open, we can have more of our gatherings outside, we can have outdoor dining. And if we enter into another surge now, it will be completely unacceptable.”…

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  • Three Groups Of Women We Need To Marshall Forward Today

    According to Northeastern University research, more than 1 in 10 working parents reports having lost a job or reducing hours solely due to childcare. Among those who were unemployed, 25% of women said it was due to childcare versus 13% of men.

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  • Boulder, Atlanta mass killings were among 7 so far this year. Here are the others you might have missed.

    A sobering database compiled by USA TODAY, the Associated Press and Northeastern University in Boston tracks mass killings – defined as four or more dead, not including the killer. Two of the tragedies took place in Indianapolis, one apparently was not a shooting. There were 23 mass killings in 2020, down from 45 in 2019, according to the database. James Alan Fox, the Lipman Family Professor of Criminology, Law & Public Policy at Northeastern University, said one reason for the decline might be that mass killers are often motivated by a feeling of being unfairly treated by society.

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  • Questions From Listeners A Year Into Pandemic / Anxiety Surrounding A Return To Normalcy / Helping Kids With Autism Returning To School / How The Pandemic Changed Dress Codes

    Northeastern University Marketing Associate Professor Daniele Mathras discusses how the pandemic will change what people wear to work in the future…

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  • How a lab at Northeastern and technology developed in Watertown are helping identify new virus variants

    Northeastern University has been aggressive in its approach to testing both students and employees. A special lab was set up in Burlington to monitor the tests the school requires everyone to take, and so far, about 800,000 tests have been analyzed.

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  • Governor races to test COVID-19 response, Trump influence

    A survey from the Covid States Project, a consortium of researchers from Northeastern University, Rutgers, Northwestern University and Harvard, found a majority of voters approved of a governor’s handling of the pandemic in Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York and Ohio, all states where governorships are up for election next year.

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  • When will there be enough herd immunity to return to the workplace?

    The problem is, it isn’t a magic number, and it isn’t just one number at all. According to Dr. Samuel Scarpino, who directs the emergent epidemics lab at Northeastern University, “small changes in your assumptions, small changes in the way the disease is actually spreading in the population, lead to wildly different possible trajectories.”…

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  • Supply Chain Feature: Hungry, Hungry Shoppers

    “Consumer demand is pent up and it will be unleashed when this is over,” Nada Sanders, professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University, said during her keynote presentation at last month’s PLMA Live! Presents Private Label Week.

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  • World Happiness Report is out, with a surprising picture of global resilience

    “The best individual levels of psychological resilience come when we take a really horrible event like a car crash or the death of a loved one [and] turn that into a story of, ‘You know, this really bad thing happened. It was really hard. And I got through it, and here’s what I did to get out of it,’ ” said Daniel Aldrich, director of the Security and Resilience Studies program at Northeastern University. “As opposed to saying, ‘I’m still that person stuck in my house’ or ‘I’m still the person anxious about getting my parents sick.’ It’s hard to maintain that narrative and feel like I’m moving forward.”…

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  • Today’s Leaders Are In Deep Shift: The Digital Transformation Of Our Work-Life

    Dr. Curtis Odom is the Managing Partner at Prescient Strategists, and an Executive Professor of Management at Northeastern University.

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  • Mass. expected to ease business restrictions, expand eligibility for vaccinations Monday

    “The advice from public health experts is pretty clear and specific with respect to the governor’s plans around reopening,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. “And that’s that we’re moving too quickly.”…

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  • Drug companies defend vaccine monopolies in face of global outcry

    “It doesn’t make any sense for rich countries to think they can vaccinate their own and let the rest of the world live off dribs and drabs,” said Brook Baker, a Northeastern University law professor.

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  • Five reasons why COVID herd immunity is probably impossible

    A vaccine’s ability to block transmission doesn’t need to be 100% to make a difference. Even 70% effectiveness would be “amazing”, says Samuel Scarpino, a network scientist who studies infectious diseases at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. But there could still be a substantial amount of virus spread that would make it a lot harder to break transmission chains.

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  • Companies grab slice of vaccine rollout but do shots get to those in most need?

    “Pretty much across the board the distribution has been grossly unequal,” said Sam Scarpino, a researcher studying infectious disease dynamics at Northeastern University. “One of the big concerns is that the result will be pockets of communities that are well protected, and pockets that are vulnerable.”…

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  • Why Won’t Companies Share Their COVID-19 Vaccine Formulas?

    GBH Morning Edition host Joe Mathieu spoke with Northeastern University law professor and GBH News legal analyst Daniel Medwed to learn more about U.S. intellectual property law and at least one effort underway to get companies to share their vaccine formulas. …

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  • Survey finds declining approval for Governor Baker’s handling of pandemic

    The Republican governor, who has led the state through the deadly pandemic for the past year, has been presiding over a vaccination campaign that has left many residents frustrated. David Lazer, a Northeastern University political science and computer science professor who worked on the report, said researchers found that approval ratings for governors’ handling of the pandemic had declined across the country.

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  • Biden’s ‘no-fail mission’: preventing the next pandemic

    “There’s definitely a scenario with a coordinated federal response where we had caught the East Coast introductions in time, and have what would’ve amounted to a completely different future with COVID-19,” said Dr. Sam Scarpino, director of the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University. “One thing that’s generally true about epidemics, and we’ve seen this play out with COVID, is that you either stop it or you don’t,” he said. “There’s very little room for middle ground.”…

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  • What business owners should know about the Massachusetts COVID relief bill that offers help to PPP recipients

    Enrich, professor of law emeritus at Northeastern University School of Law who serves on the board of left-leaning think tank MassBudget, told MassLive earlier this month. “That is simply a confused narrative that has been exploited by lobbyists for the business community.”…

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  • Juggling Her Job And Her Children’s Education: One Woman’s Pandemic Year

    “The stakes are definitely higher for low income women,” said Alicia Sasser Modestino, a professor of public policy, urban affairs and economics at Northeastern University.

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  • The Highly Competitive, Hypocritical, and Altogether Essential World of Pandemic Pods

    Alicia Sasser Modestino, director of research at Northeastern University’s Dukakis Center, says that Massachusetts has one of the highest rates of female workforce participation, which also means it is one of the states with the greatest dependence on childcare. A survey she conducted in the fall found that a quarter of the women who became unemployed during the pandemic said a lack of childcare was the sole reason.

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  • HOW SCIENTISTS SCRAMBLED TO STOP DONALD TRUMP’S EPA FROM WIPING OUT CLIMATE DATA

    “Trump wanted to tear the EPA into little bits,” says Sara Wylie, an associate professor at Northeastern University who responded to Shapiro’s email. “We started talking on that email thread about what we might be able to do.”…

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  • Without mask requirements, essential workers in Texas and Mississippi say they feel more vulnerable than ever

    “The mask debate has been framed as a question of individual choice and individual responsibility,” said Wendy E. Parmet, director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University. “But when people choose not to wear a mask, they’re not only taking on risk for themselves, they’re also passing that risk onto others who don’t have the choice to walk away or keep their distance.”…

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  • “Vaccine tourism” stretches states’ supplies

    Reports of wealthy couples taking private jets to Florida to get vaccinated have made national news, but Wendy Parmet, law and public policy and urban affairs professor at Northeastern University, said the problem is much deeper than a few ultra-rich skipping the line. “If there’s not a lot of transparency and trust in the system, in its fairness and equity, then there are always going to be some people to game the system,” creating a “vicious cycle of inequity,” she said.

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  • New Google.org COVID-19 database could hold key to disease’s mysteries

    An international team of researchers from institutions including Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University and the University of Oxford has partnered with Google.org, Google’s nonprofit subsidiary, to release Global.health, a platform that contains information about almost 10 million COVID-19 cases from over 100 countries.

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  • Fewer getting tested for COVID-19, which is a problem, experts say

    “The better the job we do with testing, the more certainty we have in what’s going on, and the more certainty we can have in what actions we need to take — whether that’s relaxing [public health] measures or increasing measures,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist.

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  • Global health stats: Google.org tackles COVID-19 with new tracking tool

    With the support of Google.org, researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University and Oxford University created Global.health with the express purpose of leveraging data from open-access and authoritative public health sources to track disease progression.

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  • How The Merck-Johnson & Johnson Collaboration Could Factor Into The Global Vaccination Effort

    Here & Now‘s Callum Borchers speaks with Brook Baker, professor at Northeastern University School of Law with a focus on intellectual property and access to medicine.

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  • Where to Buy N95s, KN95s, and Surgical-Style Masks You Can Trust

    But also, KN95 and surgical-style masks don’t always fit very well. As Loretta Fernandez, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Northeastern University in Boston, explained, “There’s nothing magical about a KN95. The edges still need to form a good seal against the face for it to be protective.” …

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  • ‘US support for IP waiver at WTO would be ground-changing’

    Brook Baker, Health GAP senior policy analyst and Northeastern University Professor of Law told TOI: Every day the Biden administration spends obstructing the TRIPS waiver proposal further delays Covid-19 vaccination for the 90% of people in low- and middle-income countries. …

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  • Sick Days Don’t Look So Good Now That You Can Work From Home

    “When everything happens in the same place, you no longer have that geographic boundary” between work and home, says Barbara Larson, a business professor at Northeastern University.

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  • New COVID-19 tracking platform captures real-time spread, future outbreaks

    With the support of Google.org, researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University and Oxford University created Global.health with the express purpose of leveraging anonymised data from open-access authoritative public health sources to track disease progression, read a statement by Google.

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  • Google launches Global.health to combat COVID-19

    With the support of Google.org, researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University and Oxford University created Global.health with the express purpose of leveraging anonymized data from open-access authoritative public health sources to track disease progression.

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  • Google.org’s new tracking tool leverages global health stats to tackle COVID-19

    With the support of Google.org, researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University and Oxford University created Global.health with the express purpose of leveraging anonymised data from open-access authoritative public health sources to track disease progression.

    READ MORE
  • Google.org’s New Tracking Tool Leverages Global Health Stats To Tackle COVID-19

    With the support of Google.org, researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University and Oxford University created Global.health with the express purpose of leveraging anonymised data from open-access authoritative public health sources to track disease progression.

    READ MORE
  • Google.Org’s New Tracking Tool Leverages Global Health Stats To Tackle COVID-19

    With the support of Google.org, researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University and Oxford University created Global.health with the express purpose of leveraging anonymised data from open-access authoritative public health sources to track disease progression.

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  • Google.org’s tracking tool Global.Health leverages stats to tackle COVID-19

    A consortium of researchers from the University of Oxford, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Northeastern University, in collaboration with Google.org and The Rockefeller Foundation launched Global.health:  a scalable and open-access platform that pulls together millions of anonymised COVID-19 cases from over 100 countries.

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  • State offered leftover vaccines to civilians at a clinic for first responders, prompting questions

    Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist, said it’s reasonable that the administration would try to ensure no shots are wasted. But how the administration approached it shows a lack of planning and could exacerbate the inequities in who is able to be vaccinated, he said.

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  • Why Student Loan Forgiveness Is Crucial for Entrepreneurs

    Karthik Krishnan’s research is at least partially responsible for the simplest answer–the more debt you forgive, the better it’ll be for entrepreneurship–but the Northeastern University economist strongly warns against that argument.

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  • ‘Charlie, you’re making a big mistake’: Experts criticize state’s Monday reopening

    But Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University, said Baker is not paying attention to other indicators that show Massachusetts is doing poorly compared to many states, including death rates due to COVID-19 and vaccine rollouts. “The experts are saying it’s too soon to reopen,” Scarpino said. “And the response from the governor is, ‘Let’s fill the baseball stadiums.’ It’s just mind-boggling.”…

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  • The Grift and Cybercrime Blight on the Covid-19 Vaccine Rollout

     “That gives some plausibility to the authenticity of what they’re selling” on the black market, said Nikos Passas, the co-director of Northeastern University’s Institute for Security and Public Policy.

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  • Google, Northeastern partner with Boston Children’s to track Covid

    The groups include Boston Children’s Hospital, Northeastern University, and Google.org, as well as the University of Oxford and the Rockefeller Foundation. Google.org is the charitable arm of the technology giant (Nasdaq: GOOGL). The effort is funded through a $1.25 million commitment from Google as well as a $1.5 million commitment in funding from the Rockefeller Foundation. …

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  • Biden Orders Review to Shore Up Supply Chain Resiliency

    “We could talk about buying American all we want but if we have not ensured the supply chain is functioning, we’re going to continue to have shortages and stock outs,” said Nada Sanders, a professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University.

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  • Massive Google-funded COVID database will track variants and immunity

    By mid-January 2020, epidemiologists were doing just this for SARS-CoV-2 — but had not come to a consensus about their findings. Sam Scarpino, an epidemiologist who directs the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, tweeted that the evidence didn’t confirm sustained human-to-human transmission. And he remembers Rivers responding to him in a direct message: “She said, ‘Dude, I think you’re wrong.’”…

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  • Google’s new tracking tool could help stop next Covid wave

    Global.health was created by a consortium of researchers from institutions including the University of Oxford, Tsinghua University, Northeastern University and Boston Children’s Hospital, using funding from Google’s charity arm Google.org.

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  • Backed by Google, epidemiologists launch a sweeping Covid-19 data platform

    Last January, Samuel Scarpino wasn’t sure what to make of Covid-19. The director of Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab, he, along with every other epidemiologist in the world, was trying to interpret the earliest data on the new virus.

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  • As US surpasses 500,000 COVID deaths, experts reflect on what could have been

    “It’s really tragic that this is not surprising,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. “The risk that we would mismanage this, especially federally,” was clear early last spring, he said.

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  • From Double Masking to When to Toss Your Cloth Mask: All Your COVID Masking Questions, Answered

    A separate study from Northeastern University, which has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, also found wide gaps in protectiveness — anywhere from 30 percent to 90 percent — between different kinds of fabric masks.

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  • Why opening restaurants is exactly what the coronavirus wants us to do

    “We’re standing at an inflection point,” said Sam Scarpino, assistant professor at Northeastern University and director of the school’s Emergent Epidemics Lab. Thanks to the arrival of vaccines, he said, “we finally have the chance right now to bring this back under control, but if we ease up now, we may end up wasting all the effort we put in.”…

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  • On The Trail: The political perils of Snowmageddon

    Even the coronavirus pandemic has become a measure by which executives are judged. A massive public opinion survey conducted by researchers at Northeastern University, Rutgers, Harvard and Northwestern University in November found that voters gave the highest marks to governors who had enacted some of the strictest lockdown measures.

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  • Yes, COVID’s still here, but it is time to live again

    Brandon Dionne, assistant clinical professor of pharmacy and health systems sciences at Northeastern University said in October that “until we have reached a point where globally we can prevent transmission, there’s always a risk that it could flare back up.”…

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  • A long way to go: The state’s goal is to vaccinate 4.1 million Mass. adults

    Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist, said he also expected that, at some point in the coming months, the focus of the vaccination effort in Massachusetts would turn to younger people. “That would be my assumption — that this first goal is what we want to do for people over 18,” and once younger people become eligible, “we would very quickly move to vaccinate them,” Scarpino said.

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  • ‘The need for human contact is extremely profound’: When we can hug, will we remember how?

    “The need for human contact is extremely profound,” says Judith Hall, a psychology professor emeritus at Northeastern University who researched interpersonal touch at the university’s Social Interaction Lab. But whether to hug someone or not sometimes seems touchy.

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  • Poop Could Be Our New Secret Weapon Against Mutant COVID Strains

    Then, once researchers get the sewage, it needs to be evaluated. That process involves using computers to sift through enormous piles of genetic information, to separate the signal from the noise, according to Jared Auclair, who leads the genomic sequencing lab at Northeastern University. “The largest problem is the sheer amount of data,” Auclair told VICE News. “It’s finding a needle in a haystack.”…

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  • ‘It’s like we’re trying our best to help the virus’: A fourth wave is looming if US fails to contain COVID-19 variants, experts say

    It’s difficult to predict what the virus will do over the next few months, said Samuel Scarpino, who conducts infectious disease forecasting at Northeastern University in Boston. The variants make estimates more difficult, he said, as do the rising rate of vaccination, the relaxation of some COVID-19 public health measures, the lack of demographic information on who’s getting vaccinated and the limited genetic surveillance, which makes it harder to know exactly what the variants are doing. “All those meet together to make it a very murky picture over the next few months,” he said.

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  • Why the three biggest vaccine makers failed on Covid-19

    The big three incumbents preferred to prioritise their tried and tested methods. “Companies tend to rely on their proprietary technologies because they think they can trust them — and don’t want to infringe on rivals’ intellectual property,” said Mansoor Amiji, professor of pharmaceutical sciences at Northeastern university.

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  • When will vaccines be available for next groups?

    “We’ve been very sluggish at getting to this next level of vaccination — individuals that are 65 plus — and I have not seen a clear explanation for why it is that we have the vaccines here and are not getting them into people’s arms efficiently,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor in the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • Icy Conditions Cause Slick Roads, Power Outages and COVID Vaccine Cancellations

    The weather has been freezing up a statewide vaccination process that so many wish would run fluidly. Massachusetts is behind in administering vaccinations, according to a supply chain expert at Northeastern University, but the large-scale effort can help. “I think mass vaccination sites are really important because you want to maximize throughput in supply chain management,” said Dr. Nada Sanders of Northeastern University. “You don’t want a bottleneck anywhere.”…

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  • Worcester State University Opens Tuesday as Mass Vaccination Site

    Dr. Nada Sanders, Distinguished Professor of Supply Chain Management at Northeastern University, says mega sites should be part of a wider system that brings back hospitals to vaccine distribution. And supply chain experts should be included in decision making. “I see constantly questions being asked of physicians about supply chain,” she said. “They don’t understand how supply chains work.”…

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  • Conflicting expert opinions about COVID-19 vaccine rollout in Massachusetts

    “We’ve been very sluggish at getting to this next level of vaccination — individuals that are 65 plus — and I have not seen a clear explanation for why it is that we have the vaccines here and are not getting them into people’s arms efficiently,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor in the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • Modeling shows UK variant gaining in spring

    But the computational epidemiologist from Northeastern University, whose COVID-19 modeling is used in CDC forecasts, said this is actually a critical time in the pandemic, despite sinking numbers of infections, hospitalizations and deaths. “The issue is that we are in a race,” Dr. Vespignani said. “So on one side, we are trying to immunize as many people as we can. On the other hand, unfortunately, we have the problem of the U.K. variant.”…

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  • Number of new COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts trending down

    “If you look at the cases tied to long-term care facilities, tied to health care settings, there have been week on week drops,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor in the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • Will COVID passport offer route to freedom?

    “It would be opening different doors for different people. People who are vaccinated would have more opportunities than people who are not vaccinated,” said Wendy Parmet, Matthews University Distinguished Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University.

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  • Opening doors wider makes sense for speeding up COVID vaccinations, experts say

    “Even if this isn’t the best possible plan, the fact that we seem to be coming up with a plan for how to ensure that we don’t waste any of the vaccines and they get into people’s arms — this is a good step,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. “Doing something early is almost always better than waiting around until you have the best possible plan.”…

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  • Why Opening Restaurants Is Exactly What the Coronavirus Wants Us to Do

    “We’re standing at an inflection point,” said Sam Scarpino, assistant professor at Northeastern University and director of the school’s Emergent Epidemics Lab. Thanks to the arrival of vaccines, he said, “we finally have the chance right now to bring this back under control, but if we ease up now, we may end up wasting all the effort we put in.”…

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  • WHO Recommends AstraZeneca Vaccine, but Questions Complicate Rollout

    “We’re going to see the same cycle again,” said Northeastern University law professor Brook Baker, senior policy analyst at the Health Global Access Project. “The rich countries will run to the front of the line for the new variant vaccines. And countries will be left behind again as petri dishes for new variants to develop.”…

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  • Two masks are better than one in fight against COVID: US CDC

    But David Lazer, a professor at Northeastern University and one of the survey authors, told NPR last month that more needs to be done to reduce the spread of the virus. “The good news is we’ve improved a lot in terms of mask-wearing and social distancing. The bad news is, to bend the curve they really need to be much better,” Lazer said. Wendy Parmet, Professor of Law and faculty director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University in Boston told Al Jazeera that mask wearing has become highly politicised and polarising.

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  • Neuroscience shows how interconnected we are – even in a time of isolation

    Lisa Feldman Barrett is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University, Massachusetts, and author of Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain…

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  • If double-masking is hurting your ears, try these tips to relieve the pain

    “In general, of the many masks that we tested — and there are over 50 — the ones that seemed to provide the best fit were the ones that had elastic that went around the back of the head and the back of the neck,” Fernandez said. Still, not all masks that are secured around the head had good fit, she noted. Some masks using straps that had to be tied left gaps where air could pass through unfiltered.

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  • CDC survey finds people are warming up to the idea of coronavirus shots, but many remain reluctant

    The survey was conducted by The COVID-19 Consortium for Understanding the Public’s Policy Preferences Across States, which is a joint project of Northeastern University, Harvard University, Rutgers University, and Northwestern University.

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  • Pandemic, Political Tensions Prompt A Run On Guns, Survey Shows

    The COVID States Project has been working with researchers at top colleges to conduct national surveys throughout the pandemic. That includes those at Northwestern, Northeastern, Harvard and Rutgers universities. And that tracks with some of the federal gun sale data, according to Matthew Simonson of Northeastern University, who led the research.

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  • Another Covid crisis: A vaccine apartheid endangering us all

    The effects of this inequity would be stark. Modelling by Northeastern University indicates that if the first two billion doses of Covid-19 vaccines were distributed proportionally by the national population, worldwide deaths would fall by 61%. But if the doses are monopolised by 47 of the world’s richest countries, only 33% fewer people will die.

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  • Why Opening Restaurants Is Exactly What the Coronavirus Wants Us to Do

    “We’re standing at an inflection point,” said Sam Scarpino, assistant professor at Northeastern University and director of the school’s Emergent Epidemics Lab. Thanks to the arrival of vaccines, he said, “we finally have the chance right now to bring this back under control, but if we ease up now, we may end up wasting all the effort we put in.”…

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  • Employers’ Vaccine Mandates Are Representative of America’s Failed Approach to Public Health

    We can’t rely on the private sector to protect the common good. Wendy E. Parmet Law professor at Northeastern University…

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  • 34 bus stops away: the hurdles car-less Americans face to reach vaccine sites

    “It’s a good match for independent pharmacies because they typically do not have a lot of space in their pharmacies, but they’re very adept at going off-site,” said Todd Brown, vice-chair of Northeastern University’s school of pharmacy and executive director of the Massachusetts independent pharmacists association.

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  • Is it better to wear two face masks in public? Here’s what the experts say

    In another study, Dr. Loretta Fernandez, an associate professor at Northeastern University, found that adding a layer of nylon to a homemade mask can make it fit more snugly over the nose and mouth.

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  • A remote work revolution

    Our guests are DEREK THOMPSON, staff writer at the Atlantic, and BARBARA LARSON, professor of management at Northeastern University.

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  • 5 Hacks To Make Your Face Mask More Protective

    Then pull the ring over your head and on top of your mask to create a tight fit to the face. Tights should also work well, says Loretta Fernandez, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Northeastern University who conducted prior research on the power of pantyhose.

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  • Spotlighting Under Covered News: Northeastern Students Reach Beyond COVID And D.C. Dysfunction

    Dan Kennedy is a professor of journalism at Northeastern University and a panelist on WGBH 2’s Beat the Press.

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  • What’s behind the dip in coronavirus cases? We ask specialists

    Vaccinations could be helping slow COVID-19 transmission among one population, said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. Long-term-care facilities, where residents and workers have begun to be vaccinated, have been tied to a reduced number of COVID-19 clusters in recent weeks, based on state data analyzed by Scarpino and postdoctoral researcher Brennan Klein, both of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern.

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  • Hoping life gets back to normal soon? Don’t read this scary coronavirus pandemic prediction

    “This is one reason why it’s important not to think just locally but globally,” said Northeastern University scientist Alessandro Vespignani told the paper. “We could have a perfectly rolled-out vaccine campaign in the US and Europe. But if we let the virus go wild and have a lot of cases in other places, that could boomerang—there might be a variant able to escape our immune-system protection.”…

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  • It’s Time for a National Pandemic Prediction Agency

    “The IHME models got better and better over time, but they should have started off where they were in the summer, and that didn’t happen because a lot of that learning had to occur in real time during the pandemic,” says Sam Scarpino, director of the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University. “A lot of the data systems had to be stood up in real time during the pandemic. The National Weather Service doesn’t learn to forecast a thunderstorm as they see clouds gathering over the plains of Kansas.”…

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  • How red states might block Biden’s roadmap to Covid recovery

    “Biden speaks to the aspiration of unity, and it’s nice to hope for that, but the pandemic has been understood by much of the country through deeply polarized and politicized lenses,” said Wendy Parmet, a professor of law and public policy at Northeastern University.

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  • The pandemic has caused lots of worries in kids. Don’t let vaccines become one of them.

    “What emotion looks like in the brain depends on what your brain is preparing for you to do,” says Lisa Feldman Barrett, a distinguished professor of psychology at Northeastern University and an expert in the neuroscience of emotion. Preparing to respond to a threat triggers fight-or-flight responses in the brain. The nervous system gets ready to release hormones like adrenaline, which can make your heart race, priming your body to run fast, almost like revving your car’s engine before you speed off.

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  • Expert: Supply chain focus can help fix federal vaccine rollout

    “What we need is a centralized national plan,” said Nada Sanders, a distinguished professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University. “We have to be able to see from the federal level the entire picture.”…

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  • CDC to Require Masks on All Forms of Public Transportation

    Opponents of the mandate are likely to challenge the action in court, though Wendy Parmet, director of the school’s center for health policy and law at Northeastern University Law School, said the authority comes from the same act that empowered the Trump administration to impose a moratorium on evictions. The CDC on Friday extended that moratorium, which was scheduled to expire on Jan. 31, to March 31.

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  • We’re relying on the wrong pharmacies for vaccinations

    Todd Brown is an instructor and vice chair at Northeastern University School of Pharmacy and executive director of the Massachusetts Independent Pharmacists Association.

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  • Baltimore-area community leaders step up outreach efforts to encourage Black residents to get coronavirus vaccine

    These efforts come as research shows Black people are more likely to reject COVID-19 vaccines, according to a new study from Northeastern University, Harvard University/Harvard Medical School, Rutgers University and Northwestern University. It found that 33% of African American respondents “would not get the vaccine,” compared with 23% of white respondents, 10% of Asian American respondents and 20% of Hispanic respondents surveyed.

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  • How Vaccine Nationalism Could Extend the Pandemic’s Run

    A study by Northeastern University in Boston concluded that monopolization of vaccines by wealthy nations — what’s known as “vaccine nationalism” — could cause almost twice as many deaths as distributing them equally.

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  • Taking stock of what worked and what didn’t when reopening Northeastern during COVID-19

    The colleges and universities that reopened in the fall — for the most part, with success — got an evolving lesson in how to keep students and faculty safe in the midst of a global pandemic. Now, as a new semester begins, many more colleges are bringing students back to campus while facing a new set of health and safety challenges, including the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine. Joseph E. Aoun is president of Northeastern University.

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  • Shape-Shifting Virus Threatens Cycles of Illness, Lockdowns

    “This is one reason why it’s important not to think just locally but globally,” said Alessandro Vespignani, a Northeastern University scientist who models pandemics. “We could have a perfectly rolled-out vaccine campaign in the U.S. and Europe. But if we let the virus go wild and have a lot of cases in other places, that could boomerang—there might be a variant able to escape our immune-system protection.”…

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  • The number of Americans who want to be vaccinated as soon as possible has risen, a survey found.

    A new collaborative effort, also released Wednesday, by researchers at Harvard, Rutgers, Northeastern and Northwestern that surveyed 25,640 adults across 50 states between December and early January drilled even further into the particulars of persuasive vaccine messaging.

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  • Are two masks better than one? Double masking ‘just makes common sense’ to help prevent COVID-19 spread, Fauci says

    A study published in the peer-reviewed journal Matter in July found that wearing two masks could increase protection from virus particles by 50% up to 75%. It not only added an extra layer of protection but also made the mask fit snugger around the face, said Dr. Loretta Fernandez, study author and associate professor at Northeastern University.

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  • Covid-19: Five days that shaped the outbreak

    Although no-one knew it at the time, between 2,300 and 4,000 people were by now likely infected, according to a recent model by MOBS Lab at Northeastern University in Boston. The outbreak was also thought to be doubling in size every few days. Epidemiologists say that at this early part of an outbreak, each day and even each hour is critical.

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  • Domestic violence via technology on the rise during pandemic

    Margo Lindauer is the director of the Domestic Violence Institute at Northeastern University of Law in Boston and Rosalyn Park directs the Women’s Human Rights Program at The Advocates for Human Rights; they share their knowledge on the increase in technology-assisted domestic violence during COVID-19.

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  • Restraining orders double during pandemic

    She cited statistics from renowned criminologist James Alan Fox, of Northeastern University. He reported a 72% increase in all murder-suicides between intimate partners from 2014 to 2017. Furthermore, 94% of the victims were female, his studies showed.

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  • Developing nations ‘on track’ for 2 billion jabs by end of the year despite ‘feeding frenzy’

    It will also be more deadly – modelling from Northeastern University suggests the global death toll could be twice as high if the first two billion vaccine doses are not fairly distributed worldwide.

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  • After Baker relaxes some pandemic restrictions, epidemiologists urge caution

    Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University, also expressed concerns about the restriction rollback. “Although I agree with the [governor] that the indicators are headed in a better direction, we are in a really precarious situation with respect to hospitalizations,” Scarpino wrote in an e-mail, adding that Baker’s move “to relax measures sends the wrong message. It communicates that things are safer, which is not the case. Things are finally headed in a safer direction, but we need to stay on this trajectory for a few weeks until the hospitalization numbers come way down.”…

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  • 2021 Will Be ‘A Race Between Vaccination And This New Variant,’ Says Northeastern Professor

    GBH Morning Edition host Joe Mathieu spoke with Northeastern University political science and computer science professor David Lazer about the numbers and his outlook for 2021. The transcript below has been edited for clarity.

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  • What Biden can do to fix America’s Covid-19 vaccine mess

    But there are some things the federal government could do, said Nada Sanders, a distinguished professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University. One is called “backward scheduling”: The Biden administration could partner with states to set a goal for how many people to vaccinate and then work backward, going from injecting the vaccine to the factory where the dose was produced in order to figure out what’s needed at every step. This won’t anticipate every single problem, but it will at least give officials a way to prepare.

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  • A Covid-19 peak? Variants muddy forecasts for coming months

    As variants emerge, it will be crucial to adhere to measures to slow the virus’s spread and pick up the pace of vaccinations to keep all of those figures from spiking, said coronavirus modeler Alessandro Vespignani, director of Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute.

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  • COVID-19 pandemic worsens housing disparities in Boston

    Northeastern professor Dan O’Brien points out many of these larger landlords have not signed onto the state’s Eviction Diversion Pledge which says they’ll abide by the CDC moratorium and work with residents to create payment plans.

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  • How President Joe Biden could use the Defense Production Act to increase vaccine production

    Brook Baker, a law professor at Northeastern University, also said that other vaccine manufacturers may have reduced access to key ingredients. “So there is a kind of interruption to ordinary market competition that can be a result of this,“ he said. “But many people would say it’s still good public policy for the government to prioritize access to products that it needs.”…

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  • How engineering can contribute to a reimagining of the US public health system

    Research centers throughout the U.S., including those at the Mayo Clinic and Northeastern University’s Healthcare Systems Engineering, suggest challenges such as patient safety could be made better by applying systems engineering principles and techniques through more holistic and human-centered approaches to systems design.

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  • Amazon is offering Biden a hand distributing the Covid vaccine

    Some supply chain experts, such as Nada Sanders, a professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University, have suggested Biden enlist logistics expertise from Amazon in overseeing distribution of the vaccine because of the company’s ability to manage and quickly deliver inventory.

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  • Forced addiction treatment could be death sentence during COVID-19

    Leo Beletsky is a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University School of Law. …

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  • Biden becomes @POTUS: How the social media transition of power unfolded

    “It certainly has a big symbolic value,” said David Lazer, a political science and computer sciences professor at Northeastern University. “The centrality of Twitter to Trump’s brand and identity has made the moment a lot more significant.”…

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  • U.S. coronavirus deaths projected to hit 500,000 in February, experts say it was avoidable

    Sam Scarpino, assistant professor in the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University said, “This was largely avoidable.” In the long-term, both Scarpino and MacLeod said deaths can be prevented with a combination of increased vaccine supply, stronger testing infrastructure and better public health measures.

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  • Are you ready for remote work 3.0?

    Christopher Riedl, an associate professor at Northeastern University, and Anita Williams Woolley, an associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University, found that you want to co-ordinate remote communication in your team so it takes place in concentrated periods followed by time walled off for individual.

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  • Volunteers help out at COVID-19 vaccine centers in exchange for an early vaccine

    Daniel Aldrich, professor and director of the Security and Resilience Studies Program at Northeastern University, began studying resilience in disasters after his home was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Since then, he’s conducted a lot of research on how communities bounce back from a crisis—like the Great East Japan Earthquake.

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  • U.S. COVID Vaccine Rollout ‘Extremely Poor’—But Some States Buck the Trend

    “Extremely poor,” was the phrase used by both Nada R. Sanders, distinguished professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University, and Tim Ford, professor and chair in biomedical and nutritional Sciences at the University of Massachusetts. Professor Stephen E. Flynn, founding director of the Global Resilience Institute at Northeastern University, said: “Planning matters. National leadership matters. A strong public healthcare system matters. The United States has lacked all three.”…

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  • When will the pandemic peak in Mass.? Too many variables make it hard to predict

    Samuel V. Scarpino, director of Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab, said he’s getting mixed signals in tracking COVID-19 in Massachusetts. “Some signs are pointing to a peak coming imminently and things improving. And others are pointing in a more concerning direction,” he said.

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  • Mask-Wearing, Social Distancing Improve, But Too Slowly, Survey Shows

    “It’s good news-bad news,” says David Lazer of Northeastern University, who is helping run the survey with colleagues at Harvard, Rutgers and Northwestern universities. “The good news is we’ve improved a lot in terms of mask-wearing and social distancing. The bad news is, to bend the curve they really need to be much better,” Lazer says.

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  • In LA, ambulances circle for hours and ICUs are full. Is this what Covid-19 has in store for the rest of the country?

    “With the first wave, LA was the poster child on how to do things right,” said Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University who is based in Los Angeles. “Then we blew the lead.”…

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  • Uncertain Returns: Economic recovery will come sooner in some sectors than others. Here’s what the experts say.

    It may take a long time to get those jobs back: State GDP is already near pre-pandemic levels, but employment in Massachusetts is not expected to fully recover until late 2022, according to Alan Clayton-Matthews, a Northeastern University professor and an editor of the economics journal MassBenchmarks. “This has really exacerbated inequality, more than any other recession I can recall,” he said.

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  • Native American tribes receive COVID-19 vaccines, and health officials work to ease fears about taking it

    People of color, including indigenous people, are more likely to rely on trusted voices within their own communities for information about the pandemic and the vaccine, a study by Northeastern University that tracked online behaviors suggests.

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  • Covid-19 deaths are the highest they’ve ever been — and the more infectious variants could make things much worse

    Just as the arrival of vaccines was providing a light at the end of a tunnel, “this is like a last-minute twist that creates more problems,” said Northeastern University’s Alessandro Vespignani, who models how emerging diseases spread.

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  • Most people in Boston say they’ll get vaccinated; many Black residents are skeptical

    The research is part of a collaboration among UMass Boston, Northeastern University, and the Boston Public Health Commission, which together have been surveying residents about the effects of the pandemic for months.

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  • A dummy’s guide to how trade rules affect access to vaccines

    Ronald Labonte, Professor and Distinguished Research Chair, Globalization and Health Equity, L’Université d’Ottawa/University of Ottawa and Brook K. Baker, Professor of Law, Northeastern University…

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  • Capitol riots: How many arrests so far?

    As Northeastern University’s Max Abrahms, a political-science professor who studies counterterrorism, explains, it can take time to track down a suspect – for a variety of reasons. “This could be an individual who doesn’t have a lot of friends or colleagues,” Abrahms says.

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  • Leading with data on the path to normalcy

    In our recent conversation with Sam Scarpino, we discussed the data-driven path to normalcy, including vaccination rollout, data that are fundamental for measuring success, and the complexities inherent in delivering on broad public health goals. …

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  • Vaccine nationalism to increase COVID-19 deaths, prolong pandemic: Experts

    “[Vaccine nationalism] might risk prolonging the crisis. If you don’t inoculate a sufficient percentage of the population, you don’t have the immunity to go back to normality,” said Nikos Passas, criminology professor at Northeastern University.

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  • America’s messy Covid-19 vaccine rollout, explained

    “As a supply chain person, you kind of see this sort of train wreck that you know is coming,” Nada Sanders, a supply chain management expert at Northeastern University, told me. “And now it’s just going to get worse and worse.”…

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  • Coronavirus vaccine: Northeastern becomes one of the first universities to administer shots

    Northeastern University on Tuesday became one of the first universities in the country to administer the coronavirus vaccine, according to the school. After receiving 200 doses of the Moderna vaccine from the state, Northeastern gave the first dose to nearly 100 people who are included in Phase One of the Massachusetts rollout plan.

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  • Northeastern becomes one of the first universities in the US to administer COVID vaccines

    On Tuesday, 88 people at Northeastern received their first dose, the school reported. The people worked at the university’s Cabot Testing Center, the Life Sciences Testing Center, and University Health and Counseling Services. Overall the school received 200 doses of the Moderna vaccine “with more doses to come.” The school is “an official Massachusetts COVID-19 vaccine provider,” it said.

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  • This Massachusetts College Is Among the First to Distribute the COVID-19 Vaccine

    Northeastern University says it is one of the first colleges in the country to administer doses of the coronavirus vaccine to staff members.

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  • We’re botching the vaccine rollout. Here’s how to get it back on track

    “What we’re dealing with is the capacity for the state and the municipalities to essentially mobilize themselves to be able to carry out this campaign, and they’re doing that without a lot of resources,” says Stephen Flynn, director of the Global Resilience Institute at Northeastern University. As underfunded public health departments simultaneously deal with the ongoing emergency, local budgets that depend on 2020 revenue are also shrinking.

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  • Health Workers Are Going Viral on TikTok for Debunking COVID-19 Myths

    In fact, some studies have shown they seem even more prone to believe misinformation about the pandemic: A September survey of more than 21,000 Americans by researchers led by a group from Northeastern University found that adults under 25 had the highest probability of believing a false claim about COVID-19. …

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  • CDC records highest-ever drug deaths in a 12-month period

    In an Inquirer article last year about the rising overdose toll in Philadelphia and around the country, Northeastern University professor Leo Beletsky said lockdown measures must be designed with people who use drugs in mind, making sure they can access overdose-reversal drugs, treatment, and economic and social support so they can safely stay home. He added that many response measures are “lacking” in that respect.

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  • How Covid-19 Is Shaping The Future Of Innovation

    Innovation initiatives after the Covid-19 crisis, however, are likely to prioritize quality ahead of speed. First-movers enjoy less of an advantage in times of rapid change. “Gradual evolution in both technology and markets provides first movers with the best conditions for creating a dominant position that is long lasting,” point out Fernando Saurz and Gianvito Lanzolla, professors at Northeastern University and London Business School, respectively.

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  • What Will It Take To End The COVID-19 Pandemic?

    So why can’t the world simply manufacture more doses? Lawyer Brook Baker at Northeastern University believes there’s an underlying root cause: international patents on COVID-19 vaccines. “The [vaccine] innovators hold patent rights and trade secret rights over those technologies, and they’re unwilling to share them broadly to other manufacturers. So we have artificially constricted supply,” says Baker, who studies how laws affect access to medicines.

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  • Officials warn of fake COVID-19 vaccines

    “There is so much secrecy built in here that the dark figure of crime is at this stage impossible to estimate,” said Nikos Passas, a professor of criminology and criminal justice at Northeastern University in Boston Massachusetts.

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  • Poorer countries risk getting ‘stuck’ in Covid crisis until 2023

    Modelling Northeastern University published in September also found that, if rich countries buy up the first two billion doses of vaccine instead of distributing them in proportion to the global population, then almost twice as many people could die from Covid-19.

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  • Where Year Two of the Pandemic Will Take Us

    Meanwhile, some 42 percent of Republicans currently say they would refuse a vaccine; “if Trump was enthusiastic about the vaccination, he could play a remarkably constructive role” in swaying his supporters, said David Lazer, a political scientist at Northeastern University. (Mike Pence was vaccinated on December 18.) So what if infected people from regions that have not reached the threshold travel to neighboring areas that have? “The technical term is that it becomes a big mess,” said Sam Scarpino of Northeastern University, who studies infectious-disease dynamics.

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  • Investigators Identify Person of Interest in Nashville Explosion

    Stephen Flynn, director of the Global Resilience Institute at Northeastern University in Boston, said many cities have buildings that were once filled with telephone operators but that have been repurposed with servers and other electronic infrastructure.

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  • Coronavirus Variant Is Indeed More Transmissible, New Study Suggests

    Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University in Boston, who was not involved in the study, said of the new estimates, “Unfortunately, this is another twist in the plot.” “While we were all rejoicing for the vaccine,” he added, “here is the possibility of a change of epidemiological context that makes our next few months much more complex and more perilous to navigate. Evidence is accumulating that the variant is more transmissible, and this implies that it will likely require an even greater effort to keep spreading under control.”…

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  • How Vaccine Nationalism Could Extend the Pandemic’s Run

    A study by Northeastern University in Boston concluded that monopolization of vaccines by wealthy nations — what’s known as “vaccine nationalism” — could cause almost twice as many deaths as distributing them equally.

    READ MORE
  • Should residents of hard-hit cities and towns be vaccinated before other groups? Some epidemiologists think so

    Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor and head of the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University, said states have an ethical imperative to use the vaccine to address the health inequities amplified by the pandemic, and communities that have suffered the worst should be prioritized. “It’s clear in the data some individuals in essential roles are at much higher risk for infection than others,” Scarpino said. Decades of racism and xenophobia have allowed health disparities among people of color to flourish, he said, exacerbating the risks and consequences of catching COVID-19 as a result.

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  • TO END THE PANDEMIC, THE COVID-19 VACCINE MUST CLEAR ONE FINAL OBSTACLE

    President Trump’s comments about a pre-election Covid-19 vaccine proved particularly divisive, David Lazar, a professor of political science and computer science at Northeastern University, tells Inverse.

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  • Ford employee gets asked for winning lottery numbers, palm readings

    Job title aside, which can sound “new-agey” and be off-putting, the job itself is about understanding the role of human behavior and its impact on business, said Nada Sanders, a distinguished professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • New science reevaluates risks of indoor dining

    But that information “doesn’t really help us,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. We know that people who live together are likely to spread the disease to one another, he explained, but the first household member to be infected had to get COVID-19 somewhere else, whether at work, running errands, or out and about in their community. “What we have to do is figure out how to stop [COVID-19] from getting into the households,” Scarpino said.

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  • ‘The system is just overwhelmed’: Post office struggles with holiday deluge

    Nada Sanders, a supply chain expert at Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business, said capacity issues may persist well beyond the holidays — and perhaps even beyond the pandemic — if the sharp uptick in e-commerce sticks. She called on Congress to provide more funding to the USPS so it can keep up with demand long term.

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  • A Smile at a Wedding, a Cheer at a Soccer Game Are Alike the World Over

    Using video and considering context is “absolutely a step forward” for the field, says Lisa Feldman Barrett, a professor and psychologist at Northeastern University, who wrote an accompanying commentary on the study. “The question that they’re asking strikes right at the heart of the nature of emotion,” she remarks, but there’s a risk that such information might be used to judge people, which “would be premature because there are multiple ways to interpret these results.”…

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  • The Data on Coronavirus and Public Holidays

    Alessandro Vespignani, a computational epidemiologist at Northeastern University in Boston, who analysed the effects of travel restrictions on the spread of the virus, will also be spending Christmas at home with his immediate family. …

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  • Feeling Overwhelmed? Here’s The Right Way to Tell a Child That You’re Stressed

    If stress makes you snap, your first move is to apologize, followed with something along the lines of, “That was not a productive response,” says Laura Dudley, associate clinical professor of applied psychology at Northeastern University. …

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  • Explaining The ‘Unusual Route’ Texas Took To Bring Its Election Lawsuit To The Supreme Court

    GBH Morning Edition host Joe Mathieu spoke with Northeastern University law professor and GBH News legal analyst Daniel Medwed about that case from Texas and why it was ultimately struck down by the Supreme Court.

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  • COVID-19 vaccines raise hope but the ‘last mile’ challenge looms

    She also pointed to a report by Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, which showed unequal distribution of vaccines between rich and poor nations could cause twice as many deaths overall.

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  • Baystate Business: Economic Restrictions

    Northeastern University Professor Sam Scarpino on the rising Covid numbers in the state that may lead to new economic restrictions …

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  • Is Massachusetts Headed for Another Shutdown?

    “The real concern isthere might not be any options left except for a lockdown,” said Sam Scarpino, director of Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab.

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  • No, you don’t have to go to your company’s virtual holiday party

    Laura Dudley, a behavior analyst at Northeastern University, said that missing the nonverbal cues that you would normally experience in person can be taxing on our brains. It’s hard, for example, to maintain eye contact with someone over video chat.

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  • The virus spreads at wildfire speed in tiny Rhode Island, surpassing rates of new cases elsewhere.

    “One of the things Rhode Island suffers from in the context of Covid is that it’s not a very big state in terms of its footprint,’’ said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University. “It’s as though Massachusetts was getting reported on in terms of only what’s happening in Boston.’’…

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  • What You Need to Know About Getting Tested for Coronavirus

    A survey from Northeastern University and Harvard Medical School found that this fall, patients had to wait days just to schedule a test and even more time to get results. …

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  • We know how to curb the pandemic. How do we make people listen?

    A recent report by researchers from Northeastern University and elsewhere found that the number of Americans heeding most recommendations has dropped steadily since April. …

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  • As Newton prepares to reopen high schools, COVID-19 surveillance testing will begin for staff

    Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist who did not sign the letter, said surveillance testing needs to be conducted at least once a week to be effective. “Everything I’ve seen suggests that anything longer than a week [and for sure less frequently than every-other-week] is unlikely to have an effect,” Scarpino said in an e-mail.

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  • Gates Foundation boosts funding to get coronavirus vaccines to the world’s poorest people

    Modeling by researchers at Northeastern University commissioned by the Gates Foundation found that if rich nations monopolize the first 3 billion doses of vaccine, the virus will spread unchecked in the developing world for months until more vaccine becomes available. The global death toll could be twice as high compared to a scenario where vaccines are distributed equitably based on population.

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  • Pandemic Fatigue, Meet Pandemic Anger

    “The initial research we’re seeing on persuading people to ‘socially distance’ suggests that messages framed in that way tend to be the most effective,” says David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University. Such conversations may also be more effective with people you know, according to Aziza Ahmed, a health law professor at Northeastern.

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  • ‘I Give It A Golf Clap’: Critics Say Baker’s Reopening Roll-Back Isn’t Enough To Combat Rise In COVID Cases

    “We have to take action right now,” said Samuel Scarpino, who directs the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University. “We’re running out of options to prevent the hospitals from being overwhelmed.”…

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  • For some, COVID tests are free and fast. Others stand in line, pay $160, and wait days for results

    “Solving the equity problem also solves the COVID problem,” said Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor of network science who heads Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab. “If we had nearly ubiquitous, free, asymptomatic testing that came back in 36 hours, it’s not only equitable, it gets us out of this pandemic way before most of us get this vaccine.”…

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  • The Real Reason Americans Aren’t Quarantining

    “We’ve had a lot more nudges than real, enforceable orders,” says Wendy Parmet, a law professor at Northeastern University. Hawaii is also unique in that it has no land borders with other states. In most states, stopping people at the border is impossible because people regularly cross state lines for work and other essential activities. “Imagine trying to actually enforce an interstate quarantine in the New York metro area. You can’t do it,” Parmet told me. Supposed state travel restrictions, she said, “are somewhat sad acts of desperation based on the lack of federal policy.”…

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  • Vaccine Nationalism Is Doomed to Fail

    According to recent modeling by Northeastern University, proportional distribution of vaccines could avert nearly twice as many deaths as a vaccine distribution limited to only high-income countries.

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  • Survey suggests support for more restrictions in Mass.

    “The biggest single conclusion is that there is a lot of public support for the governor to be more aggressive in his response to COVID-19,” said David Lazer, a Northeastern University professor and researcher with the COVID-19 Consortium for Understanding the Public’s Policy Preferences Across States, which sponsored the survey. The effort also included researchers from Harvard, Northwestern University, and Rutgers University.

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  • Is Massachusetts In A Post-Thanksgiving Coronavirus Spike? It Depends On Who You Ask

    Sam Scarpino, assistant professor of network science and head of Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab, said the case increase in Massachusetts has been building for months. “If you just basically fit an exponential growth curve to the data in October and then just run that line forward through November, it kind of cuts right through the middle of the testing patterns during Thanksgiving and pretty much exactly predicts the test positivity rates that we’re seeing over the past few days,” Scarpino said.

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  • Vaccines Present a Global Prisoner’s Dilemma

    A lab at Northeastern University in Boston has modeled two counterfactual scenarios of what would have happened if a vaccine had been available in March 2020. …

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  • Op-Ed: Learning as meditation in a Zoom classroom

    Iris Berent is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University. She is the author of “The Blind Storyteller: How We Reason About Human Nature.”…

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  • How to keep hope in bleak circumstances

    “Everything your brain is doing is in service of regulating your body,” said Lisa Feldman Barrett, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University in Boston and author of “Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain.”…

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  • Philadelphia may be on the way to a record for fatal drug overdoses in 2020, another COVID-19 consequence

    “There have been controversies around the lockdowns — people arguing the treatment is worse than the disease, that it’s going to cause mental health and substance use issues, and that we shouldn’t have lockdowns,” said Leo Beletsky, a Northeastern University professor who runs the school’s Health in Justice Action Lab and was one of the study’s authors.

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  • Graphics: COVID-19 is bad now. According to many projections, it’s going to get worse

    Modelers who are trying to look into the future have sketched out a wide variety of scenarios, from the optimistic to the horrific. But the general gist, said Alessandro Vespignani, professor of physics, computer science, and health science at Northeastern University, is that “things are getting worse.”…

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  • How 700 Epidemiologists Are Living Now, and What They Think Is Next

    “I think it will be a few years before gathering with large groups of people in crowded public places and being on airplanes and other public transportation will feel safe to me,” said Beth Molnar, an associate professor at Northeastern University.

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  • Prisons should be COVID-19 vaccine priority: Health experts

    “Patients in nursing homes are being put in the front of the line for vaccine access, which makes sense,” said Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University. “But lots of people in prison are of same age and same health status as people in nursing homes.”…

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  • Cardiac Arrests Tied to Overdoses Have Surged During the Pandemic

    Researchers from UCLA and Northeastern University analyzed overdose-related emergency medical services data from the National EMS Information System, which encompasses more than 10,000 EMS agencies in the U.S. and represents more than 80% of EMS activations nationally for 2020, according to the study. …

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  • ‘Rough Times’ Ahead: What You Should Know as the World Waits for a Vaccine

    As Fauci has said repeatedly since April, “It’s not going to be a light switch” where one day the pandemic is suddenly over and everything is back to normal. Part of that is because while the high efficacy of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines is promising, Dr. Brandon Dionne, assistant clinical professor at Northeastern University’s School of Pharmacy and an infectious disease specialist, says that there are still plenty of unanswered questions. …

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  • Here’s how to manage people you’ve never even met

    Hold one-one-one video meetings with everyone and ask about their role and responsibilities, what the team and company could be doing better, unresolved pain points and what they need to be better workers, recommended Barbara Larson, executive professor of management at Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business.

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  • Social Distancing Plummeted In Lead-Up To Fall Surge, Survey Finds

    “The bad news here is that we let our guard down in the pandemic and partisan differences remain,” says David Lazer, a professor of political science at Northeastern University who is helping lead the survey. “The good news here is, there is a collective desire to do what’s necessary to keep the disease at bay.”…

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  • Amid COVID-19, moms leaving the workforce could have lasting impact on economy

    Alicia Modestino, a professor at Northeastern University in Boston, said economists are calling the trend of women facing the same decision as Morales a “she-cession.” “Women are taking the brunt of the labor market damage from COVID-19,” Modestino said. “This is for two reasons. One is because a lot of the industries and occupations that they work in have been hard hit by the pandemic. But the second reason is because of the lack of child care and the disruption that day care and school closures have caused.”…

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  • Health Experts Watch For Post-Thanksgiving Virus Spike, Anticipate Upcoming Holiday Travel

    Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor of network science who heads Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab, joined WBUR’s Morning Edition host Bob Oakes to discuss what trends may emerge in the latest numbers.

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  • Want to Be More Productive While Working From Home? Get Up and Move Around

    That’s according to Charles Hillman, the co-director of the Center for Cognitive and Brain Health at Northeastern University in Boston. Hillman has been studying the relationship between exercise and cognition for decades and has generally found that making time for a 20-minute brisk walk can improve work performance and brain function.

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  • Outbreak at Hampden County jails; CDC study suggests COVID was in US earlier than thought

    The conclusion reached by scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention bolsters prior evidence that the virus may have begun spreading across the globe earlier than first believed — including one earlier model from researchers at Northeastern University that projected more than 100 people in Boston had likely been exposed by mid-February.

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  • New Survey Shows How Effects Of COVID-19 Got So Bad In The U.S.

    Here’s David Lazer from Northeastern. He helps run the survey. DAVID LAZER: We let our guard down. And it was still lurking. It was still there, right? And COVID-19 came roaring back.

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  • Public health experts closely watch COVID-19 rates as Thanksgiving travelers return home

    “We need to be strong, not generate more cases, and to do that, we need to be careful,” said Dr. Alessandro Vespignani, the director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University. “We don’t want to go into lockdowns or things like that.”…

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  • From campus, a lesson in controlling the virus

    And within Massachusetts, Northeastern University epidemiologist Samuel Scarpino said, there should have been more effort by Governor Charlie Baker’s administration to expand testing. “We never made the decision as a state. We just decided that we couldn’t afford it,” Scarpino said.

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  • Northeastern study reveals racial disparities in navigating the pandemic

    Daniel O’Brien, a public policy and urban affairs professor at Northeastern who led the study said the report’s findings should propel public officials and community organizations to realize that the challenges facing different neighborhoods and populations are unique and serve as a road map to ensure that those communities receive additional support during the second wave of the virus.

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  • Does the AstraZeneca Vaccine Also Stop Covid Transmission?

    A model built by Sam Scarpino, director of the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University, suggested that a switch back to the old formulation would lead to a significant drop in deaths and illnesses. Given the speed and severity of the Covid-19 pandemic, the importance of this effect could be even greater. “Especially in a country like the US with so much vaccine hesitancy, and coupled with how severe the disease can be especially in older adults, transmission block is a huge deal,” Scarpino says. “We don’t have any reason to think the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines won’t block transmission. It’s just not what has actually been measured, and something we aren’t likely to find out until we either start mass vaccination and/or they release more detailed information on the study locations—and epidemiologists start looking for effects of herd immunity.”…

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  • New Covid-19 Vaccines Stir Hope for the World’s Poor

    For Covid-19, the potential cost in lives is considerable: If the world’s 50 richest countries secure the first two billion doses of vaccines, the pandemic’s ultimate death toll will be twice as large as it would be if supply was shared more evenly, a study funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and conducted at Northeastern University found in September.

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  • What does it mean when you have COVID-19, but you don’t know how you contracted it?

    “COVID is just pretty ubiquitous and it can be hard to tell exactly where it is that you picked it up,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor and head of the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University. And as the state’s positivity rate climbs, the probability of coming into contact with someone with the virus increases.

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  • Healthcare workers urge Americans to ‘scale back’ Thanksgiving gatherings

    Gary Young, an expert in health policy at Northeastern University, said hospitals are already facing staffing shortages and extreme financial pressures from the pandemic, evidenced by hospital closures and layoffs at a time of unprecedented demand. “There are still many hospitals, particularly in rural areas, that are going to be overwhelmed,” said Young. “The preparation is not as robust as areas that really experienced a surge in the spring.”…

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  • Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

    “The consequence of longtime Gates strategies is that they go along with corporate control over supply,” said Brook Baker, a Northeastern University law professor and policy analyst for Health GAP, which advocates equitable access to drugs. “In a pandemic, that is a real problem.”…

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  • ‘The end is in sight’: Experts express optimism about COVID-19 pandemic coming to a close

    “We have every reason to be hopeful that a vaccine plus coordinated federal leadership . . . can get us to a new normal relatively quickly,” said Sam Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. “If we do not take non-pharmaceutical interventions . . waiting on a vaccine alone will probably take a year or more. But if you imagine taking those effective vaccines and layering them with the tools we have, there’s no reason we couldn’t kind of enter a new normal exiting the winter.”…

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  • COVID-19 deniers are still all too real. Here’s how we can convince them

    Lisa Feldman Barrett, a distinguished professor of psychology at Northeastern University, the chief science officer of the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Harvard University, and now the author of Seven and a Half Lessons About the Brain, agrees. She speculates a solution on a grand scale: We need the most highly coordinated influencer campaign in history to stop COVID-19 in its tracks.

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  • CDC adjusts its public health messaging to appeal to Americans’ individualism

    Daniel P. Aldrich, Professor and Director of the Security and Resilience Studies Program at Northeastern University, told me he believes selfishness is part of the problem, but not worthy of all of the blame. “Many people would say that the whole society of capitalism runs on us each out there trying to make a bunch — and it works for some of us but not all of us,” Aldrich said. “But I think the behavioral choices that we make, the information that we get, and the trust we have in the information — that is what drives me to put on the mask, to make the mask for my neighbors, or to go do the opposite, right?”…

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  • How Biden can fix the COVID-19 response while we wait for the vaccine

    Wendy E. Parmet is the Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law and Director, Center for Health Policy and Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs. Scott Burris, J.D., is a Professor of Law at Temple Law School, directing the Center for Public Health Law Research.

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  • As Pandemic Wears On, Massachusetts Residents Have Increased Risky Behaviors, Survey Finds

    Over the past seven months, Massachusetts residents have relaxed their adherence to COVID-19 prevention guidelines, according to a new survey conducted by researchers from Harvard, Northeastern, Northwestern, and Rutgers.

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  • Study Shows Mass. Residents Relaxing On Social Distancing, Contributing To Coronavirus Surge

    To discuss, Jim Braude was joined by David Lazer, a Northeastern University professor and researcher with the group that produced the study, The COVID-19 Consortium for Understanding the Public’s Policy Preferences Across States; and Dr. Katherine Gergen Barnett, vice chair of primary care innovation and transformation and program director of the department of family medicine at Boston Medical Center.

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  • Developing Nations Push for Covid-19 Vaccines Without the Patents

    “South Africa and India have a strong chance of winning if they can convince the supermajority of countries who are not benefiting from preferential advance purchase agreements and options for Covid-19 health products that their interest lies in bonding together rather than fall prey to threats from rich countries,” said Brook Baker, a professor of law at Northeastern University.

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  • New survey tracks rise in activities that spread COVID-19 in Massachusetts

    “We are in a very dangerous place in Massachusetts, and part of that is almost certainly how we’ve changed our behaviors,” said David Lazer, a Northeastern University professor and researcher with the COVID-19 Consortium for Understanding the Public’s Policy Preferences Across States, which sponsored the survey.

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  • Survey Of Mass. Residents Ties Viral Surge To Increased Indoor Gatherings

    For the past several months, a team of researchers from Northeastern University, Harvard, Rutgers and Northwestern University have been conducting a 50-state survey aimed at gauging how people’s behaviors have changed during the pandemic.

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  • Grim warning predicts more than 10,000 COVID-19 cases a day in Mass. by December

    “We really need some degree of coordinated behavior, and some of that is about individual responsibility and some of that will be coordinated acts by our institutions, our schools, our universities and our government,” Lazer said. The Northeastern University computational social scientist said we must get more aggressive immediately, because, as he says, the bad stuff lags. The daily data is behind. “Imagine if you were driving a car and you hit the brakes, like two weeks later you start to slow down,” Lazer said.

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  • A shot in the arm

    Nada Sanders, a professor of supply-chain management at Northeastern University, says the availability of a vaccine will not lead immediately to vaccinations, because so much else needs to be organised. …

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  • Poorer nations face vaccine wait behind West

    This month researchers at America’s Northeastern University published research examining the link between vaccine reach and Covid-19 mortality.

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  • We’ll Need More Than One Vaccine to Beat the Pandemic

    “We’ll probably figure out how to solve, in the short term, the cold chain, just because the estimates of the economic costs I’ve seen in the US are in the trillions of dollars. Longer term, in the US and globally, something that has to be at minus 70 is almost a nonstarter,” says Sam Scarpino, a mathematical epidemiologist at Northeastern University who studies disease spread. “We’ll continue to find out more and more about the vaccine as it scales up from Phase III to being injected in 100 million people, and then a billion people—whether it turns out that there are other things we need out of a vaccine, and if other stuff remains in the pipeline.”…

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  • With cases rising, is Massachusetts avoiding a lockdown because it doesn’t have to, or can’t afford to?

    The reality, said Alan Clayton-Matthews, a professor of economics and public policy at Northeastern University, is that businesses won’t really bounce back until the virus gets knocked down, and that could be an argument to take another hit, hopefully for just a few weeks, and shut down more fully.

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  • With a meteoric rise in deaths, talk of waves is misguided, say Covid-19 modelers

    “I don’t think the United States ever had multiple waves,” said Alessandro Vespignani, professor of physics, computer science, and health science at Northeastern University in Boston who models the pandemic’s impact. “We are leading the same wave that is moving across the country.”…

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  • Public health officials fear evictions could worsen COVID-19 spike in Mass.

    “We shouldn’t be evicting people during a pandemic,” said Sam Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University. “From an epidemiological perspective, households are high risk for transmission.”…

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  • People of Black and Asian descent up to twice as likely to get COVID as white people: meta-analysis

    Black and Hispanic respondents waited 4.4 days and 4.1 days on average for their test results, respectively, compared with white respondents’ 3.5 days and Asian Americans’ 3.6 days, according to a survey by researchers at Northeastern University, Harvard University, Rutgers University and Northwestern University.

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  • Freelance Childcare: Why We Need To Solve This Problem Made Worse By Covid-19

    We know from research that working parents – a third of the US workforce – lose an average of eight hours per week due to child care responsibilities during the pandemic, per Northeastern University research.

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  • The business case for child care

    Working parents — who make up about a third of the U.S. workforce — are losing an average of eight hours per week due to child care responsibilities during the pandemic, per Northeastern University research.

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  • There may be a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of the year, but ‘normality’ may not come until end of 2021

    Even if a vaccine is approved this year, there won’t be enough available to change the course of the pandemic for months, said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University in Boston, who directs the school’s Emergent Epidemics Lab.

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  • When churches turn into COVID-19 testing sites

    “Churches are really a way to break down some of those barriers,” remarked Tiffany Joseph, a professor of sociology and international affairs at Northeastern University, who has done extensive research on immigrants’ access to health care.

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  • Virtual schooling has largely forced moms, not dads, to quit work. It will hurt the economy for years.

    “You look down the barrel of an entire school year of remote and hybrid learning, and you just want to give up,” said Alicia Sasser Modestino, an economist at Northeastern University. “Women are dropping out of work, up and down the income scale. We’re seeing surgeons dropping out of the labor market and epidemiologists drop out during the pandemic. ”…

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  • Coronavirus FAQs: Are 3 Masks Better Than 1? Will Mouthwash Keep You Safe?

    As correspondent Maria Godoy reported: Researchers at Northeastern University added an outer layer made from nylon stockings to a homemade face covering. They found that the nylon layer can boost a mask’s ability to filter out small particles in the air by creating a tighter seal between the mask and the wearer’s face.

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  • How the pandemic has put building design and ventilation back into the public health conversation

    Sara Jensen Carr, an assistant professor of architecture at Boston’s Northeastern University, says that even with the lessons history can teach us about the interplay between health and architecture, we still have a lot to learn about how to adapt — or rebuild — our homes, schools and workplaces to better protect ourselves against COVID-19.

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  • What Counts as Success in a COVID Semester

    Northeastern University, in Boston, has also kept case numbers down in part through frequent testing. Students get tested every three days, and faculty members, staff and contractors get tested twice weekly. Since the start of the semester, Northeastern has completed 320,764 tests and turned up 165 positive results — 135 among students and 30 among faculty and staff members and contract employees.

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  • How To Celebrate Halloween In A Pandemic

    We’re joined by Shalanda Baker, professor of law, public policy, and urban affairs at Northeastern University, and Emily Reichert, CEO of Somerville-based Greentown Labs, the largest climate tech startup incubator in North America.

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  • Boston officials urge more residents to get COVID-19 tests. Experts say that message applies to the whole state

    “The only tool we have besides mask-wearing and social distancing is testing-tracing-isolation-quarantine,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. It is an approach that has worked well for universities in the Boston area, as well as a number of countries around the world that have kept cases from ballooning out of control.

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  • The Pandemic Is Devastating Women and Could Make It Harder for Them to Vote

    About 13% of working parents said they’d lost a job or reduced their hours because of a lack of child care, according to a survey of more than 2,000 people, conducted by researchers from Northeastern University between May 10 and June 22.

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  • Almost half of South Dakota’s prison population tests positive for COVID-19

    “Unfortunately, the result was predictable,” said Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University. “In many states, the top hotspots for COVID spread have been prisons and jails.”…

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  • Americans Working From Home Face Internet Usage Limits

    “We’ve lived through this scenario and did well without caps on bandwidth usage, which makes you question why they are needed at all,” said David Choffnes, an associate professor at the Khoury College of Computer Sciences at Northeastern University.

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  • Winter will bring new COVID-19 challenges, but it does not have to bring an overwhelming surge

    “The concern [about flu season] is sort of three-fold,” said Sam Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. First, it’s unclear how influenza viruses and the novel coronavirus will interact: They could inhibit one another or have no interaction at all, or each could amplify the other’s spread. Second, both illnesses can inflame the lungs, and anyone who has been sick with either COVID-19 or flu would likely be at higher risk for complications if they later contract the other disease.

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  • COVID-19 Herd Immunity Strategies Could Bring ‘Untold Death and Suffering’

    Herd-immunity calculations such as the ones in Kwok’s example are built on assumptions that might not reflect real life, says Samuel Scarpino, a network scientist who studies infectious disease at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. “Most of the herd-immunity calculations don’t have anything to say about behaviour at all. They assume there’s no interventions, no behavioural changes or anything like that,” he says.

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  • Child care crisis is denting the labor market

    The big picture: “There is no new normal to this. It just keeps getting worse every day,” says Alicia Modestino, an economics professor at Northeastern University and a former senior economist at the Boston Fed.

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  • ‘The Numbers Don’t Look Good’ As Mass. Coronavirus Indicators Continue To Rise

    “The numbers don’t look good,” says Sam Scarpino, who directs the Emerging Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University.

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  • Study finds older people, Republicans more likely to share coronavirus misinformation on Twitter

    A new study led by researchers at Northeastern University finds that older people and Republicans are more likely to post coronavirus-related tweets with links to fake news sites.

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  • ‘Shecession’: The Pandemic’s Impact On Women In The Workforce

    Alicia Modestino, labor economist. Associate professor of public policy, urban affairs and economics at Northeastern University.  …

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  • The false promise of herd immunity for COVID-19

    Herd-immunity calculations such as the ones in Kwok’s example are built on assumptions that might not reflect real life, says Samuel Scarpino, a network scientist who studies infectious disease at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. “Most of the herd-immunity calculations don’t have anything to say about behaviour at all. They assume there’s no interventions, no behavioural changes or anything like that,” he says. …

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  • When we can hug again, will we remember how it works?

    “The need for human contact is extremely profound,” said Judith Hall, a psychology professor emeritus at Northeastern University who researched interpersonal touch at the university’s Social Interaction Lab.

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  • Do we need a COVID-19 video game? How about 51 games? I think we might

    “People are just walking down the screen and you’re trying to keep them far apart. Then it adds the variable of masks. Then it adds the variable of sick people. Then you have to prioritize,” says IndieCade’s Celia Pearce, a game designer and professor at Northeastern University. …

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  • Could We Face Another Round of Grocery Shortages as COVID Cases Spike?

    “The level of panic may not be as much as it was in the spring, but I think the consumer demand will be as high through the holidays. Once we are done with the holidays, we are going to start seeing a dip back to normalcy,” said Nada R. Sanders, professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University.

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  • COVID-19 test turnaround time still lags — especially for people of color

    The average wait time for receiving COVID-19 test results dropped from 4.0 days in April to 2.7 days in September, according to the analysis of national survey data by researchers at Northeastern University, Harvard University, Rutgers University and Northwestern University.

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  • Coronavirus Test Results Get Faster, But Still Too Slow To Help Slow Disease Spread

    “That is how you limit the spread of the disease and limit the number of people who have to socially isolate and avoid lockdowns,” says Dr. David Lazer of Northeastern University, who led the team conducting the survey. “The good news is there has been some improvement. The bad news is everything is still taking far too long.”…

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  • As cases rise again, second thoughts on another lockdown

    “For the lockdowns, we know that there’s a variability in individuals that can work from home and those that can’t,” said Sam Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. That variability, he explained, leaves people of color and essential workers more exposed to the virus. Moreover, the economic costs of shutting down are felt most deeply by those already facing financial precarity.

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  • When We Can Hug Again, Will We Remember How It Works?

    “The need for human contact is extremely profound,” said Judith Hall, a psychology professor emerita at Northeastern University who researched interpersonal touch at the university’s Social Interaction Lab. But whether to hug someone or not sometimes seems fraught.

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  • How a Pioneering Covid Testing Lab Helped Keep Northeast Colleges Open

    Universities that have partnered with the Broad Institute to conduct large-scale surveillance testing have kept reported Covid-19 cases among students, faculty and staff low compared with other select schools.

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  • When False Information Goes Viral, COVID-19 Patient Groups Fight Back

    “Even if we’re not actively seeking information, we encounter these kinds of messages on social media, and because of this repeated exposure, there’s more likelihood that it’s going to seep into our thinking and perhaps even change the way that we view certain issues, even if there’s no real merit or credibility,” says Elizabeth Glowacki, a health communication researcher at Northeastern University.

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  • New York Is Trying Targeted Lockdowns. Will It Stop a Second Wave?

    But once again, New York City is just the first to deal with it. “They have the opportunity to write the playbook,” says Sam Scarpino, an applied mathematician at Northeastern University who studies how outbreaks move.

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  • Data Shows Many In Mass. Have Left The Workforce

    “We seem to be moving in the opposite direction from the country in terms of the number of people who are participating in the labor force, which means that our improvement in the unemployment rate is maybe not as rosy as it might seem,” Modestino, who is associate director of the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University, told State House News Service. “If some of that improvement is coming from people dropping out of the labor force, that’s not how we usually like to improve the unemployment rate during a recession.”…

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  • What Does The Recent Rise In COVID-19 ‘Red Zones’ Mean For Massachusetts?

    In for Jim Braude, Adam Reilly was joined by Dr. Sandra Nelson, an infectious disease physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, who has been helping to guide the Baker administration on school reopening plans, and Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor in the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, and head of the university’s Emergent Epidemics Lab.

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  • Coronavirus Hit the U.S. Long Before We Knew

    U.S. testing had largely stopped earlier this month due to problems with test kits. Odds were good the virus had taken hold in as many as 15 states, Northeastern researchers found. …

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  • What can we expect from a winter COVID-19 second wave? No one knows for sure, but there is reason for hope and concern

    “Things are likely to get bad in the winter if what we continue to do is relax measures in places where COVID-19 cases are high or increasing,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University in Boston, where he directs the school’s Emergent Epidemics Lab.

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  • The Superspreading Presidency of Donald Trump

    “The reason you wouldn’t label somebody as a superspreader is that often there isn’t anything they’re doing that’s necessarily reckless, right? And you don’t want to put a stigma on them,” says Sam Scarpino, a mathematical biologist at Northeastern University who studies Covid-19 transmission dynamics.

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  • Workers Face Permanent Job Losses as the Virus Persists

    “It’s a virtual certainty that there are going to be large scarring effects for workers in certain industries,” said Alicia Sasser Modestino, an economist at Northeastern University. “What will those workers do with the skill sets that they have?”…

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  • Often cited during Trump presidency, 25th Amendment reemerges with president’s coronavirus diagnosis

    “You don’t want there to ever be a time when there’s not a president,” said Jeremy Paul, a professor and former dean at Northeastern University School of Law.

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  • Boston Is Now Considered High Risk For COVID-19

    Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor who heads up Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab, joined WBUR’s Morning Edition host Bob Oakes to discuss.  …

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  • Five ways you can help kids learn better in online school right now

    It’s good to have a dedicated education space at home, with a work surface, a comfortable seat that supports proper posture, and required materials handy. But there’s no one-size-fits-all setup, says Laura Dudley, an associate clinical professor of applied psychology at Northeastern University.

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  • This Overlooked Variable Is the Key to the Pandemic

    Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor of epidemiology and complex systems at Northeastern, told me that this has been a huge challenge, especially for health authorities in Western societies, where the pandemic playbook was geared toward the flu—and not without reason, because pandemic flu is a genuine threat.

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  • The state once used this measure to calculate coronavirus test positivity. Here’s what it says now

    “From a disease transmission perspective, from a risk perspective, this calculation that they’re leading with [on the COVID-19 dashboard] is likely a substantial underestimate,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist. “If you have 10,000 tests a day coming from the colleges and universities who all have a very low percent positivity, then it’s very easy to end up with a biased positivity for the state.”…

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  • A three-part plan to eliminate COVID-19

    New modeling from Northeastern University helps illustrate what will happen if vaccine distribution is so unequal. …

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  • Baystate Business: Mayor Marty Walsh (Radio)

    Northeastern infectious disease expert Sam Scarpino on the worrying Covid trends in Massachusetts…

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  • Will we ever trust crowds again?

    These mental reactions don’t even need to involve a first-hand encounter with the coronavirus, says Lisa Barrett, a neuroscientist and psychologist at Northeastern University in Boston. “You can just read about it in the paper, or someone can tell you about it,” she adds.

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  • State public health officials monitoring as cases of COVID-19 increase

    Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist, said that although the state does not provide enough public information on where cases are coming from, the Centers for Disease Control reported that dining is the “highest consistent risk factor” associated with COVID-19 cases.

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  • COVID Career Advice: How To Navigate The Pandemic’s Permanent Changes To The Workplace

    Karen Cardozo is an assistant vice president of Northeastern University’s Employer Engagement and Career Design.

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  • These Colleges Are Winning the Fight Against Covid-19 — at Least for Now

    Northeastern University has conducted more than 147,000 Covid tests, with only 75 returning a positive result. At Fort Lewis College, a public liberal-arts campus in rural Colorado, nearly 3,200 Covid tests have returned just 18 positive results.

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  • U.S. hits 7M Covid cases, 2 governors call response worst in world

    “If we go back to March, at that time, we were saying if this thing is not handled very carefully, we could end up with 200,000 or 300,000 deaths,” said Alessandro Vespignani, director of Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute, told NBC News. “At that time, everyone was saying that’s impossible. I think we should use that perspective now, especially when we think about the future.”…

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  • As we adjust to a new normal, lessons in grief and gratitude

    Gratefulness also primes us for the future, says David DeSteno, a psychology professor at Northeastern University who studies gratitude. Experiencing gratitude makes us more willing to act virtuously down the line, strengthening our relationships with other people. “What that means, in terms of COVID-19, is if you feel grateful, it makes you more willing to put on that mask and help other people. It makes you more willing to go onto the computer and help an elderly neighbor who doesn’t know how to order [groceries]. It makes us willing to pay acts of kindness forward to ensure other people will pay it back to us. It strengthens our social ties,” he says.

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  • Vindicated Covid-19 models warn pandemic is far from over

    “If we go back to March, at that time, we were saying if this thing is not handled very carefully, we could end up with 200,000 or 300,000 deaths,” said a coronavirus modeler, Alessandro Vespignani, director of Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute. …

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  • Younger people more likely to believe COVID-19 misinformation, Harvard survey finds

    Younger people are more likely to believe false claims related to the novel coronavirus than older people, according to a new survey released Tuesday by a team of researchers at Harvard University, Rutgers University, Northeastern University and Northwestern University.

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  • Young People More Likely to Believe Virus Misinformation, Study Says

    Respondents 18 to 24 had an 18 percent probability of believing a false claim, compared with 9 percent for those over 65, according to the study, conducted by researchers from Harvard University, Rutgers University, Northeastern University and Northwestern University.

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  • This 5-step management plan will help a remote employee who consistently fails to perform

    Barbara Larson is an executive professor of management at the D’Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University.

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  • U.S. Covid-19 death toll surpasses 200,000

    A team at Northeastern University in Boston created a model that provides state and nationwide projections for up to four weeks in the future — akin to a weather forecast. Beyond four weeks, too many unknown factors can dilute the model’s accuracy, said Alessandro Vespignani, director of Northeastern’s Network Science Institute.

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  • Strip casinos dominate COVID tracing list; Cosmopolitan on top

    “Clearly the data paint a picture of hotels and casinos being high risk for transmission,” said professor Samuel Scarpino, head of Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab.

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  • A coronavirus vaccine will save more lives if we share it widely

    In the foundation’s annual Goalkeepers report, influenza modelers from Northeastern University estimate that equitable vaccination—that is, if vaccines were distributed to all countries around the world proportional to their population—could avert 61 percent of global deaths caused by COVID-19 infection, compared to a baseline of no vaccine existing. …

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  • Rich nations have already bought more than half of world’s vaccine doses, Oxfam finds

    Earlier this week, a report found that this exact scenario could lead to almost twice as many people dying of Covid-19, according to modelling from Northeastern University.

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  • New Report Details Impacts of Covid-19 Pandemic on Global Health

    The report also highlights research from Northeastern University that found that if the first two billion doses of Covid-19 vaccines are spread equitably across the world, 61 percent of deaths can be averted. If the early vaccine doses primarily reach the world’s highest bidders, only 33 percent of deaths will be averted.

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  • Here’s a snapshot of how US states differ on vaccine acceptance — and trust in Trump, Fauci, and scientists

    The chart shows some of the findings from a national survey released Tuesday by researchers from Northeastern University, Harvard University, Rutgers University, and Northwestern University. The survey looked at public trust in institutions and vaccine acceptance.

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  • How to help siblings get along better

    “It’s been part of our culture, at least in the US, to think that siblings fight. That there’s going to be lots of times they don’t get along. That’s what they do,” said Laurie Kramer, a professor of applied psychology at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Coronavirus updates: COVID-19 was in US as early as December, study says; NYC lockdown led to 70% drop in spread

    Meanwhile, Northeastern University researchers found if a COVID-19 vaccine was hoarded by rich countries instead of distributed equally based on population proportions, it could cause twice as many coronavirus deaths.

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  • Gates: The U.S. isn’t helping get a COVID vaccine to the rest of the world

    To Gates’ point about the equitable distribution of an eventual vaccine, and he’s clearly confident there will be one, the report includes modeling from Northeastern University that says if the vaccine is distributed in high-income countries first, and not globally, we’ll prevent 33% of COVID-19 deaths compared to no vaccine.

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  • Bill Gates says rich countries need to ensure Covid-19 vaccines can be made globally

    The foundation’s annual Goalkeepers Report, published on Sept. 14, cited original modeling from researchers at Northeastern University, which looked at how many lives could have been saved if there been an 80% effective Covid-19 vaccine available in March.

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  • ‘Covid has magnified every existing inequality’ – Melinda Gates

    Arguing for a fair distribution of any coronavirus vaccine, the report pointed to modelling by academics at Northeastern University, which suggested that if 50 wealthy countries bought up the first 2bn doses of a vaccine, rather than ensuring they are distributed proportionally to populations, almost twice as many people could die.

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  • Experts warn it might take up to four years to supply COVID-19 vaccine globally

    “What’s going to be critically important is that we pair the vaccine with other non-pharmaceutical interventions like physical distancing and mask wearing so we can maximize the benefit of the vaccine early on,” said Samuel Scarpino, epidemiologist and assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute.

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  • Could Breathalyzers Make Covid Testing Quicker and Easier?

    Six months into battling the Covid-19 pandemic, it’s clear that the US still needs better testing. Backlogs have caused unbearably long wait times for results, and the coming flu season might further encumber test processing. But what if our coronavirus-carrying breath could be harnessed to detect Covid-19? That’s the hope of some researchers at Ohio State University and Northeastern University, who are developing Covid-19 breathalyzer devices.

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  • Bill & Melinda Gates: Vaccine fairness will make us all safer

    Our foundation asked modellers at Northeastern University’s Mobs Lab to consider two different scenarios. In one, approximately 50 high-income countries monopolise the first 2bn doses of vaccine. In the other, doses are distributed globally based on each country’s population, not its wealth.

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  • Covid-19 has forced a radical shift in working habits

    A study from Christoph Riedl of Northeastern University and Anita Williams Woolley of Carnegie Mellon University, published in 2017, suggested that “bursty” communication, where people exchange ideas rapidly for a short period of time, led to better performance than constant, but less focused, communication.

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  • The building day care crisis thanks to COVID-19

    The reporting included this quote from Alicia Modestino, an economist at Northeastern University: “The child care system needs a large-scale, immediate bailout. Full stop.”…

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  • Somerville enters Phase 3 of COVID-19 reopening, last remaining Massachusetts community to do so

    To further prevent a surge of cases in the city, Curtatone launched a community wastewater testing program last week, in partnership with a Northeastern University professor, to monitor for the virus.

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  • Trust in Covid-19 Vaccines Could Turn on a Knife Edge

    For example, the U.S.’s existing “PREP” pandemic legislation shields firms from almost all injury-related lawsuits unless the cause is deemed willful misconduct (a high bar). That’s an “extraordinarily broad” view, explains Wendy Parmet, professor of law at Northeastern University. …

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  • Somerville launching community wastewater testing program to monitor for coronavirus

    Mayor Joe Curtatone announced Thursday that the city is partnering with Northeastern University Asst. Professor Ameet Pinto of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Stantec for the program that is designed to reveal COVID-19 hotspots up to one to two weeks earlier than current individual testing.

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  • Somerville, Northeastern Partner To Look For Coronavirus In City Sewage

    The initiative is a partnership between the city, the engineering firm Stantec, and a research team at Northeastern University led by Ameet Pinto, an environmental engineer and microbiologist.

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  • Fears for US recovery grow as virtual schooling continues

    Alicia Modestino of Northeastern University wrote in an article published on the EconoFact website last month that on average parents are losing a full day of work each week to address their children’s educational needs during the pandemic. About a third of the US workforce, or about 50m people, has a child under 14 at home, according to University of Chicago and Northwestern University economists.

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  • The child care industry’s plight

    “The child care system needs a large-scale, immediate bailout. Full stop,” says Alicia Modestino, an economist at Northeastern University.

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  • Child care has always been essential to our economy — let’s start treating it that way

    A recent survey from Northeastern University has found that during the pandemic, working parents lose, on average, a full day of work productivity every week due to a lack of child care. …

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  • 1 shot of coronavirus vaccine likely won’t be enough

    “We’re looking at double shots. That’s twice the amount,” said Nada Sanders, a professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University.  “Doubling is a huge supply chain issue.”…

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  • One shot of coronavirus vaccine likely won’t be enough 

    “We’re looking at double shots. That’s twice the amount,” said Nada Sanders, a professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University.  “Doubling is a huge supply chain issue.”…

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  • Is The Strip In Danger of Super-Spreading Covid-19? A Contact Tracing App May Be The Answer

    Guests:  Megan Messerly, health reporter, Nevada Independent; Brian Labus, assistant professor, UNLV School of Public Health; Marshall Allen, health reporter, ProPublica; Samuel Scarpino, assistant professor, Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute    …

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  • The cost of closed schools

    13% of them lost their jobs or cut back hours due to child care challenges during the pandemic, according to a June survey conducted by Northeastern University. And even if parents can work and care for their kids at the same time, it’s impossible to be as productive. On average, a working parent loses around eight hours a week — or a full workday — due to pandemic-era childcare responsibilities, per research by Alicia Modestino, an economist at Northeastern University.

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  • The unequal scramble for coronavirus vaccines — by the numbers

    “Their experiment of trying to convince rich countries to join to hedge their bets has gotten very few takers,” says Brook Baker, who studies access to medicines at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.

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  • This Is How To Combat ‘Zoom Gloom’ In The Time Of COVID

    “Many of the nonverbal cues that we typically rely upon during in-person conversations—eye contact, subtle shifts that indicate someone is about to speak—are out the window,” explained Laura Dudley, a behavior analyst at Northeastern University, in a recent article.

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  • Covid Hits Minorities Hardest, but Data Often Doesn’t Show It

    “We have an incredible bias on our awareness, and on any forecasting,” says Samuel Scarpino, a professor and epidemiologist at Northeastern.

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  • Is a 20 second handwash enough to kill Covid-19?

    Thomas Gilbert, an associate professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, says coronavirus’s chemical make-up can be disrupted by nothing more specialised than cheap soap and warm water.

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  • How key bottlenecks scrambled COVID-19 testing in Sacramento

    “It’s pretty stunning that we are still having these bottlenecks,” said David Lazer, a professor at Northeastern University and co-author of a recent report on turnaround times for test results across the U.S.

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  • The virus isn’t going away. That’s why campuses need to reopen.

    Op-ed by President Joseph Aoun on higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • Only About a Third of Republicans Would Get a COVID-19 Vaccine and a Third Wouldn’t: Poll

    More than a third of American respondents told Fairleigh Dickinson University pollsters in late May they would not get vaccinated, and a poll from researchers at Harvard, Northeastern University, Northwestern University and Rutgers University that was conducted in mid-July found Republicans were least likely to express interest in getting a vaccine. …

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  • Even the pandemic doesn’t slow down Philadelphia’s drug markets

    In underground economies like the drug market, disruptions in the global supply chain can wreak havoc for people in addiction, said Leo Beletsky, the director of the Health in Justice Action Lab at Northeastern University.

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  • College Move-In Will Be Lonelier and Weirder Than Ever This Year

    Northeastern University has gone all in on in-person instruction. Long famed for promoting work experience, it is now trumpeting another specialty: an on-campus lab to process 5,000 Covid-19 tests a day.

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  • 73% of Americans Say Negative COVID Test Should Be Required Before Returning to School or Work

    A similar survey, conducted by researchers at Harvard University, Northeastern University, Northwestern University and Rutgers University, found 66 percent of Americans saying that would be somewhat or extremely likely to vaccinate themselves. This poll surveyed 19,058 U.S. adults from July 10 to July 26.

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  • Boston could be next hot spot for COVID-19, experts warn

    “I’ll admit that I’m skeptical of some of the conclusions,” said Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University.

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  • Telework-Life Balance: 5 Ways to Clock Out at Home

    He quotes Laura Dudley, a behavior analyst and associate clinical professor in applied psychology at Northeastern University, who explains the importance of rituals at the end of the workday, noting that “many of us are working in the same space where we are then spending time unwinding,” and any behavior that signals that shift between the two phases of the day can be helpful. …

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  • ‘It’s The Hunger Games for Laboratories.’ Why Some People Are Waiting Weeks for Their COVID-19 Test Results

    Nada Sanders, professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University, says that without a national, authoritative body to oversee all the moving parts, every stage of the U.S. testing system, including the testing sites, the labs and the manufacturers, will continue to be overwhelmed.

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  • Water cooler moments don’t have to disappear in the virtual workplace

    Malone thinks he can prove it with a piece of videoconferencing software he built with collaborators at Northeastern University and Seoul National University, called Minglr. …

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  • Utah COVID-19 test turnaround times vary widely, audit finds

    Slower-than-needed turnaround times is a problem facing states across the U.S. months into the pandemic, according to Harvard and Northeastern University researchers.

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  • Virus Job Losses, Evictions Seen Risking Mass Attacks in Future

    “You don’t have large crowds of people gathering together— you don’t have concerts, you don’t have crowded restaurants, you don’t have crowded churches. You don’t certainly have schools open until now,” said James Alan Fox, professor of Criminology, Law and Public Policy at Northeastern University and author of the 2019 book, Extreme Killing: Understanding Serial and Mass Murder.

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  • How to Choose the Best Cloth Face Mask for You

    A recent Northeastern University paper (PDF) reports that a surgical mask sealed to the wearer with a band cut from a pair of nylon stockings went from blocking out 50% to 75% of small particles (less than 0.3 micron) to blocking 90%.  “The fit was already good,” said study co-author Loretta Fernandez, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Northeastern…

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  • Baystate Business: Pandemic Fallout (Radio)

    – Professor David Lazer, Northeastern University, on their new study that shows not everyone will be clamoring to get a Covid vaccine once it becomes available.

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  • This Is Not a Desk Chair

    The chair is “an essential component” for body support, said Michelle Robertson, a lecturer at Northeastern University and the director of the Office Ergonomics Research Committee.

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  • Republicans Least Likely to Get COVID Vaccine Despite Trump’s Push to Have It Ready by Election Day

    In a recent poll, conducted by researchers at Harvard University, Northeastern University, Northwestern University and Rutgers University, 62 percent of Republican respondents said they are likely to seek a vaccine, with 42 percent saying they are extremely likely and 20 percent saying somewhat likely.

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  • Most of the coronavirus tests the U.S. does are worthless. But there’s a solution that could actually work — and stop the spread.

    According to a new national survey by researchers from Harvard University, Northeastern University, Northwestern University and Rutgers University, Americans tested for COVID-19 in July reported waiting an average of four days for their results.

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  • The US Is Disastrously Behind in Covid-19 Testing. Again

    According to a new nationwide survey, conducted by a consortium of researchers at Rutgers, Northeastern, Northwestern, and Harvard universities, most people are not getting results within the 24- to 48-hour window recommended by public health experts to aid effective contact tracing. …

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  • Two-thirds of Americans say they would accept a coronavirus vaccine

    Conducted July 10-26 by researchers at Harvard, Rutgers, Northeastern, and Northwestern universities, the survey questioned a representative sampling of 19,000 people in 50 states and Washington, D.C.

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  • Some workers sickened by COVID-19 face an extra burden: proving where they got it

    There have been exceptions, said Emily Spieler, a professor at Northeastern University School of Law in Boston and an expert on workers’ comp. One example would be a nurse who worked in a tuberculosis ward and contracted the disease.

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  • Trying to separate life from work while stuck at home during COVID-19? Develop a ‘shutdown ritual’

    “People are engaging in these behaviors and rituals to transition themselves from work to home,” said Laura Dudley, an associate clinical professor in applied psychology at Northeastern University. “These routines can be really beneficial, especially during uncertain or uncomfortable times, like we’re in right now.”…

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  • The best job in America — or a living nightmare?

    “In a sense, it’s the federal government’s responsibility to deal with a big shock to the system like this, but the average citizen isn’t going to know,” said David Lazer, a political scientist and computer scientist at Northeastern University, who is involved with the multi-university consortium studying the states. “There is this narrative, which Cuomo has in some ways has encouraged, which is, ‘the buck stops with me.’ Sometimes the buck doesn’t really stop with him and he’ll still get the blame or the credit.’”…

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  • Seven States Join Pact to Speed Coronavirus Testing

    Most people who are tested do not receive results within the 24 to 48 hours recommended by public health experts to slow the virus’s spread and quickly conduct contact tracing, according to a new survey by researchers from Harvard University, Northeastern University, Northwestern University and Rutgers University, the Times reported.

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  • Coronavirus resurgence could prompt state’s reopening step-back

    Rachel Maddow looks at how the state of Massachusetts is considering whether rising coronavirus case numbers is an indication that they reopened too much too soon and whether rolling back their reopening to an earlier stage when the numbers were declining is advisable.

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  • ‘It’s Like Having No Testing’: Coronavirus Test Results Are Still Delayed

    Most people who are tested for the virus do not receive results within the 24 to 48 hours recommended by public health experts to effectively stall the virus’s spread and quickly conduct contact tracing, according to a new national survey by researchers from Harvard University, Northeastern University, Northwestern University and Rutgers University.

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  • National survey: Nearly two-thirds of Americans have to wait more than 2 days for coronavirus results

    “If we have any hope to contain COVID-19, it will be because strategies like contact tracing have worked. Contact tracing will only work well if there’s a fast turnaround on testing,” said David Lazer, a Northeastern University political science and computer science professor who was one of the researchers who conducted the study.

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  • Will pandemic compel Congress to ease bank capital requirements?

    “Somebody’s got to … reemploy people once this thing is over, and they’re going to need capital, and the banking system is the major source of that,” said William Dickens, a professor and chair of the … economics department at Northeastern University.

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  • Amid rise in COVID-19 cases, experts urge rollback of reopening in Mass.

    The state should take these numbers as evidence that it’s time to roll back reopening, said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University epidemiologist.

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  • What Can Ants and Bees Teach Us About Containing Disease?

    The insects are “living in very confined environments where there’s a lot of microbial load,” said Rebeca Rosengaus, a behavioral ecologist who studies social insect behavior at Northeastern University in Boston. …

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  • Bill Gates suggests calling out non-mask wearers—but here’s what experts say you should do

    Aziza Ahmed, a law professor who specializes in health at Northeastern University, advises it’s okay to put “little bit of social pressure on people” you know, but not necessarily with strangers.

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  • Coronavirus child care pinch in U.S. poses threat to economic gains of working women

    A survey here by Northeastern University between May 10-June 22 found that 13% of working parents had to resign or reduce their work hours because of a lack of child care during the health crisis, with women impacted significantly more than men. …

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  • Mass. economy shrank by 44% rate in second quarter

    Growth in the third quarter “should be sharply higher,” Alan Clayton-Matthews, a Northeastern University professor and MassBenchmarks senior contributing editor, said in a statement, adding that “there is the very real possibility that state performance in the third quarter will outpace that of the nation.”…

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  • Coronavirus: Remote learning turns kids into zombies because we’re doing it all wrong

    Lindsay Portnoy is a cognitive scientist, associate teaching professor at Northeastern University, and a member of her local school board. …

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  • Massachusetts economy suffers worst quarter in history thanks to coronavirus, UMass study finds

    “As the economy continues to reopen, third quarter growth should be sharply higher,” said Alan Clayton-Matthews, MassBenchmarks senior contributing editor and professor emeritus of economics and public policy at Northeastern University. “Given that Massachusetts started opening up later than most other states and is having success limiting the spread of COVID-19 thus far, there is the very real possibility that state performance in the third quarter will outpace that of the nation.”…

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  • Surprising shortages pop up amid the coronavirus pandemic

    “Coke is facing is a different sort of thing right now; it’s something that’s a shift in demand, which is temporary, and they’re not in position to respond to it other than to…put all of their eggs into the baskets that are going out the door fastest,” said William Dickens, University Distinguished Professor and chair of the economics department at Northeastern University.

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  • Coronavirus child-care crisis will set women back a generation

    Alicia Sasser Modestino is an associate professor in the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University, where she studies issues related to gender and the labor market.

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  • Google Is Helping Its Workers Cope With Bad Government

    For one thing, all-remote teams often work better than partially remote teams, says Barbara Larson, a professor at Northeastern University who studied geographically dispersed teams long before they became pandemic-necessary.

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  • In Social Insects, Researchers Find Clues for Battling Pandemics

    The insects are “living in very confined environments where there’s a lot of microbial load,” said Rebeca Rosengaus, a behavioral ecologist who studies social insect behavior at Northeastern University in Boston.

    READ MORE
  • Some Insects Are Very Social. They Also May Offer Hints for Controlling Disease.

    The insects are “living in very confined environments where there’s a lot of microbial load,” said Rebeca Rosengaus, a behavioral ecologist who studies social insect behavior at Northeastern University in Boston. …

    READ MORE
  • As people gather for summer events, calls grow for public to wear masks, socially distance during COVID-19 pandemic

    Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University, said more people must understand the danger and the importance of wearing masks and practicing social distancing in public. …

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  • Kids at Home Could Put the Economy in Detention

    A survey by Northeastern University economists Alicia Sasser Modestino, Jamie Ladge and Alisa Lincoln conducted in May and June found that 13.3% of working parents lost their job or reduced their hours because of a lack of child care.

    READ MORE
  • Do face masks work? Here’s what the science says

    Laboratory testing by Northeastern University, in Boston, found that surgical masks block out 75 per cent of respiratory-droplet-size particles, while the University of Hong Kong found that loose-fitting surgical masks block almost all contagious droplets breathed out by infectious people.

    READ MORE
  • The economy is awful. It’ll get worse if states have to slash and burn

    “If you wanted to get aid to where it’s needed most, then you should be providing it to state governments and letting them make the decisions,” said Alicia Sasser Modestino, an associate professor at Northeastern University, who, along with Klein from the Fletcher School, was one the letter’s seven initial signers.

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  • What happens when a student or staffer gets sick at school this fall?

    Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University, said the protocols seem to assume that test results will return quickly, but the current reality is far different. Test results are now often delayed by up to a week or more in Massachusetts. Scarpino envisioned dozens of kids in a school at one time having symptoms of the common cold, which are similar to those for COVID-19.

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  • How To Plan A Safe Picnic During The Coronavirus Pandemic

    But Darin Detwiler, associate professor of food policy at Northeastern University, suggests taking it a step further, especially in light of COVID-19. Detwiler advises prepping food in individual portions instead of serving family-style, or having everyone use common utensils. “Avoid sharing, such as many hands in a bowl or basket. This not only conflicts with social distancing, but cross-contaminates and creates dirty hands. Individual bags of chips, prepared baggies of snacks or fruits, and individual [sandwiches] would be safer,” he said.

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  • Newsletter: What’s the Best Way to Support the Recovery?

    Roughly 13% of parents have lost jobs or reduced work hours because of a lack of child care during the pandemic, according to a coming report by Northeastern University.

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  • Amid Surge in Covid-19, Companies and Parents Brace for More Child-Care Conflicts

    Roughly 13% of parents have lost jobs or reduced work hours because of a lack of child care during the pandemic, according to a coming report by Northeastern University. And their options are dwindling.

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  • US economy faces new hurdle for recovery: Child care crisis

    Thirteen percent of working parents had to quit a job or reduce hours due to a lack of child care, according to Northeastern University researcher and economics professor Alicia Sasser Modestino. The study found parents lost an average of one full day of work per week to address their child’s needs. It was based on a survey of 2,557 working parents and was conducted between May 7 and June 22.

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  • Do face masks work? Here’s what the science says

    Laboratory testing by Northeastern University, in Boston, found that surgical masks block out 75 per cent of respiratory-droplet-size particles, while the University of Hong Kong found that loose-fitting surgical masks block almost all contagious droplets breathed out by infectious people.

    READ MORE
  • Here’s what coronavirus testing on college campuses in Massachusetts might look like this fall

    “If we are going to [use] testing to control outbreaks, you have to get results back in one to two days, even three days is too slow,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University disease tracker. “If I were … anyone setting policy, I would have that on my daily dashboard and would make a lot of decisions about reopening based on that number.”…

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  • Working moms always battled shame. The pandemic just made it worse

    Jamie Ladge is an associate professor of management and organizational development at the D’Amore-McKim School of Business at Northeastern University and a distinguished research professor at the University of Exeter Business School. …

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  • The U.S. might lose 40% of its childcare centers without funding

    According to Northeastern University economics professor Alicia Sasser Modestino, 13% of working parents had to quit a job or reduce hours due to lack of childcare between May and June, and as University of Arkansas professor Gema Zamarro’s research proves, mothers are disproportionately affected.

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  • Legal Liability During The Coronavirus Pandemic

    WGBH Morning Edition host Joe Mathieu spoke with Northeastern University law professor and WGBH News legal analyst Daniel Medwed about liability and the legal concerns surrounding reopening.

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  • Do face masks work? Here’s what the science says

    Laboratory testing by Northeastern University, in Boston, found that surgical masks block out 75 per cent of respiratory-droplet-size particles, while the University of Hong Kong found that loose-fitting surgical masks block almost all contagious droplets breathed out by infectious people.

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  • Why We’re Losing the Battle With Covid-19

    “In the 1700s and 1800s state and local officials could do all sorts of things in the name of public health, like close businesses and hold ships at port and forcibly quarantine people, that they could not otherwise do,” says Wendy Parmet, a public-health legal scholar at Northeastern University. “But by World War II those powers lost their pre-eminence.”…

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  • How to fix the Covid-19 dumpster fire in the U.S.

    Enough with the “but the flu” and “it’s getting better” and “it’s going to go away on its own” talk. There needs to be consistent communications from all levels of government about the risk the virus poses, said Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • Pickup truck medicine: saving primary care during Covid-19

    Timothy J. Hoff is a professor of management, health care systems, and health policy at Northeastern University in Boston, a visiting associate fellow at the University of Oxford, and the author of “Next in Line: Lowered Care Expectations in the Age of Retail- and Value-Based Health” (Oxford University Press, 2017).

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  • We’re Not Prepared to Track Disease Outbreaks in America’s Poorest ZIP Codes

    “We found that the model was highly accurate for individuals who lived in neighborhoods in the upper three-fourths of income distribution, and was inaccurate for individuals who live in the lowest quartile,” says lead author Samuel V. Scarpino, an applied mathematics researcher who heads the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Coronavirus was likely spreading widely across the US as early as February, model suggests

    While direct imports from China and other countries may have been responsible for the early introduction of Covid-19 to the US, most spread was state to state, researchers led by a team at Northeastern University in Boston reported.

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  • What to Do If You’re Not Ready to Return to the Office

    “People are generally resistant to any requests in those situations,” says negotiation expert Parker Ellen, an assistant professor of management and at Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business.

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  • Do you wear a mask when seeing your friends and family?

    “We’re getting used to this new, ‘I’m going to assess my risk; I’m not going to just live in my house,’” Dr. William Sharp, an associate professor of psychology at Northeastern University, said. “I would say with 99 percent certainty, these [conversations] are going to come up.”…

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  • Can an algorithm predict the pandemic’s next moves?

    It integrated those data streams with a sophisticated prediction model developed at Northeastern University, based on how people move and interact in communities.

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  • Want To Create A Better Mask? It’s Harder Than It Seams

    We asked researchers Loretta Fernandez and Amy Mueller at Northeastern University to test the Bilio mask. They’ve been testing the performance of a range of various masks, measuring to see how well they protect the wearer from inhaling particles that may carry the coronavirus.

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  • As cases spike in California, a warning for Massachusetts

    “It’s great news that the number of fatalities have come down. It’s an important indicator that the sacrifices we all made worked, at least in the sense of bringing the outbreak back under control,” said Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University professor who specializes in infectious disease.

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  • Can an Algorithm Predict the Pandemic’s Next Moves?

     It integrated those data streams with a sophisticated prediction model developed at Northeastern University, based on how people move and interact in communities.

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  • A User’s Guide To Masks: What’s Best At Protecting Others (And Yourself)

     This forces particles that might have otherwise gone around the loose edges of the mask and been inhaled to instead go through the mask, which can filter them out, says Loretta Fernandez, a researcher at Northeastern University.

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  • How secret deals could keep a COVID-19 drug out of reach for millions

    “These bilateral licenses … are highly restrictive in their application,” said Brook Baker, a professor of law at Northeastern University. “Gilead excluded these countries because they have commercial potential and because Gilead wants to reserve the right to prevent competition and charge higher prices.”…

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  • The Psychology Behind Why Some People Wear Face Masks – And Others Don’t

    Dr Mollie Ruben, a research assistant professor at Northeastern University who is researching the psychological effects of mask wearing in the US, says some people don’t feel safe wearing masks due to racial profiling.

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  • AI Use to Screen Pandemic Job Seekers Could Lead to Bias Claims

    The science underlying reading facial expressions is still an unresolved question, according to a study by Northeastern University researchers. “It is not possible to confidently infer happiness from a smile, anger from a scowl, or sadness from a frown, as much of current technology tries to do when applying what are mistakenly believed to be the scientific facts,” according to the study.

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  • A Pandemic Problem for Older Workers: Will They Have to Retire Sooner?

    “There is still some additional risk of bad outcomes as you enter each older decade of age up to age 70 even without an underlying condition, but it isn’t as pronounced as the risks for adult workers of all ages with health problems,” said Daniel Kim, an epidemiologist and professor at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • 5 Ways Family Businesses Can Adapt To Covid-19

    During crisis times for family businesses, “family members tend to come together and do whatever it takes to promote the family’s health and prosperity,” says Kimberly A. Eddleston, a professor of entrepreneurship and innovation at Northeastern University and a senior editor on the EIX Editorial Board.

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  • What was it like to live through the pandemic, grandpa? University archives seek items that capture COVID-19 history

    Northeastern University also is contributing works to The Year of the Plague, which has received more than 5,600 items as of June 23. Victoria Cain, director of Graduate Studies at Northeastern’s Department of History, said submissions could help their creators find a sense of purpose during this pandemic.

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  • How Can The U.S. Get A Handle On The Spread Of Coronavirus?

    In for Jim Braude, Adam Reilly joined Juliette Kayyem, a senior lecturer at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a WGBH News and CNN contributor; and Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University and the head of the university’s Emergent Epidemics Lab.

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  • On reopening schools, scientists say proceed with caution

    Policymakers should use summer break to make clear contingency plans that address the possibility of a new wave of infections during the fall semester, said Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University.

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  • White House Official: Americans Will “Just Have to Live With” Massive Coronavirus Surge

    Kudlow’s previous highlight as a White House official was the Feb. 25 interview in which he said the coronavirus had been “contained” in the U.S. According to Northeastern University modeling cited in a Thursday New York Times visual about the spread of the pandemic, the number of undetected cases in the country rose from about 2,000 to about 32,000 between Feb. 15 and March 1.

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  • How the Virus Won

     Undetected infections by Feb. 15, per estimates from a Northeastern University modeling team led by Alessandro Vespignani…

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  • How ‘Superspreading’ Events Drive Most COVID-19 Spread

    These numbers mean that preventing superspreader events could go a long way toward stopping COVID-19, says Samuel Scarpino, a network scientist who studies infectious disease at Northeastern University.

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  • High Court Saves Jobs of ‘Dreamers’ on Pandemic’s Frontlines

    “We don’t know what the Trump administration’s next move will be,” said Tiffany Joseph, an associate professor of sociology and international affairs at Northeastern University. Although DACA recipients can stay in the country, “their lives are still at risk,” she said.

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  • What We Can Learn From People Who Worked Remotely Pre-Pandemic

    Organizations where work-from-anywhere is the norm can offer tips on how to make this not only bearable, but pleasant and productive, says Barbara Larson, a professor at Northeastern University’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business. She has three takeaways—and an important caveat.

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  • How to Cope With Common Stressors During the COVID-19 Crisis

    To manage and reduce frayed nerves, Lisa Lewis, a psychologist and adjunct professor at Northeastern University, first recommends “unpacking the problem”—then asking yourself if there’s anything you can do about it. Worried about how a sputtering economy will affect your family? Try making a new budget or restructuring your retirement contributions. “On the other hand, excessive worry about things you are unable to change can take a toll,” she says. So if something beyond your control is keeping you up at night, try to put it aside for now.

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  • Don’t touch your face: pandemic within a pandemic

    On today’s episode, Don’t Touch Your Face hosts James Palmer and Amy Mackinnon look at the relationship between the pandemic and protests in the United States and around the world. They’re joined by Margaret Burnham, the director of the Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at Northeastern University, and Roudabeh Kishi, the director of research with the Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project.

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  • Emissions dropped during COVID-19. Here’s what cities can do to keep them from rising

    It’s time to double down on electric vehicles, says Northeastern professor Joan Fitzgerald.

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  • What we can learn from U.S. sentiment about the coronavirus to help stop a second wave

    A recent survey led by researchers from Harvard Kennedy School, Northeastern University, and Rutgers University supports this trend as well. The study found a majority of people in the U.S. want to continue physical distancing measures, even as the federal government and some state governors are pushing to reopen the economy.

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  • How Data Became One of the Most Powerful Tools to Fight an Epidemic

    “There really has never been a successful effort to share comprehensive open data sources during any of the modern epidemics,” says Samuel V. Scarpino, who runs the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University.

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  • Rush to Publish Risks Undermining COVID-19 Research

    James Heathers, a research scientist at Northeastern University and cohost of the Everything Hertz podcast on methodology and scientific life, said the increased speed of publication and the increased scrutiny of what’s being published means more published articles are going to come under question.

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  • Unreliable data: how doubt snowballed over Covid-19 drug research that swept the world

    James Heathers, a research scientist with Northeastern University in the US, said major results in large medical journals can affect medical policies in a matter of days, both at the level of changing local hospital practice and changing governmental health policy. …

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  • How Fear Spreads Coronavirus

    But Tiffany Joseph, a sociologist at Northeastern University who studies health access in Boston’s immigrant neighborhoods, told me, “You should not underestimate how much the fear of ICE raids and the public-charge rule worsened the pandemic in Chelsea.”   “If you go to the hospital and it turns out you’re [COVID-19]-negative, and actually what you have is some other ailment, you’re screwed,” Wendy Parmet, a law professor at Northeastern, told me.

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  • Congress Asked The CDC For Data On How The Coronavirus Is Affecting Communities Of Color. The CDC Sent Back Links To Its Public Website.

    “Thus far, the fragmented data we are getting from HHS, state, and local sources paint a very fragmented, but troubling picture,” Northeastern University health policy expert Leo Beletsky told BuzzFeed News in an email. “Systematic national data are necessary to understand the full scope of the issue and to target resources where they are most needed.

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  • The toll of coronavirus: 100,000 and counting

    “For many of us, there really is no comparison. You’d have to go back to the Vietnam War, which started 20 years before I was born,” said Assistant Professor Samuel V. Scarpino, Ph.D., of Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute. “There were about 50,000 deaths in battle during Vietnam, which is a war that lasted almost 10 years. In only a few months we’ve lost twice as many to COVID-19. Almost certainly this year COVID-19 will be the third-leading cause of death, behind heart disease and all cancers combined.”…

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  • How to fact-check coronavirus misinformation on social media

    “Particularly if it’s a family member or a friend, there are also other things you might want to consider than just encouraging belief change,” said Briony Swire-Thompson, a postdoctoral researcher at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute. “You might want to give the correction in a kind way, just because no one wants to be wrong.”…

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  • New research rewrites history of when Covid-19 took off in the U.S. — and points to missed chances to stop it

    Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute, said Worobey’s paper “confirms what a lot of what we were starting to suspect from the epidemiological data, that there were some early introductions in the West Coast that did not spark sustained transmission.”…

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  • New research suggests coronavirus spread began in U.S. in mid-February

    The bottom line: “Everything is sort of lining up in the direction that if we’re serious about it, we can control this thing,” Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute, told STAT.

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  • Missed Opportunities In Massachusetts’ COVID Response

    It’s a choice with consequences, experts say. Sam Scarpino, who heads the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University, says even that brief, final delay came at a cost.

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  • New study says Massachusetts coronavirus rates are much higher than reported and could rise steeply

    “Over 80 percent of [Massachusetts] hasn’t been infected yet,” said Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University. “We’re going to be susceptible to another wave of infections.”…

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  • You can’t turn the economy back on like a light switch

    “It’s not going to be a snap-back V-shaped recovery, at least for Main Street,” said Alicia Sasser Modestino, an associate professor of public policy and economics at Northeastern University.

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  • America’s Patchwork Pandemic Is Fraying Even Further

    These inequities will likely widen. Even before the pandemic, inequalities in poverty and access to health care “were concentrated in southern parts of the country, and in states that are politically red,” says Tiffany Joseph, a sociologist at Northeastern University. Not coincidentally, she says, those same states have tended to take social-distancing measures less seriously and reopen earlier. The price of those decisions will be disproportionately paid by black people.

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  • The pandemic is testing sibling rivalry — and you

    “They can withstand a lot of negativity. Things that wouldn’t fly in a friendship. You would lose a friendship, but your sibling is there the next day,” said Laurie Kramer, a professor of applied psychology at Northeastern University.

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  • Scientists say Baker’s reopening plan is sensible, but still concerning

    Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University, said he felt the guidelines were appropriate, but their emphasis on screening for fevers and coughs could be misleading, given the high percentage of transmission among people with no symptoms.

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  • Innovation will help us rebuild

    Daniel T. O’Brien is the director of the Boston Area Research Initiative and an associate professor of public policy and urban affairs at Northeastern University. Alicia Sasser Modestino is an associate professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern and the associate director of the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy.

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  • Nation is at a perilous moment in fight against the coronavirus

    “At this point, there is uncertainty,” said Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, who has been modeling the path of the virus. “Probably the next week will be one of the crucial ones because if we see more decrease of cases we are still on a ‘good’ trajectory — if not, it really might be more problematic for the future.”…

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  • Coronavirus Cases Slow in U.S., but the Big Picture Remains Tenuous

    “At this point, there is uncertainty,” said Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, who has been modeling the path of the virus. “Probably the next week will be one of the crucial ones because if we see more decrease of cases we are still on a ‘good’ trajectory — if not, it really might be more problematic for the future.”…

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  • Who’s Enforcing Mask Rules? Often Retail Workers, and They’re Getting Hurt

    “I never had a right to do something that could injure the health of my neighbors,” said Wendy E. Parmet, the director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University.

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  • How To Make Sense of All The COVID-19 Projections? A New Model Combines Them

    The latest update — released Tuesday — incorporates eight models, including some oft-cited ones, such as those built by the Imperial College London, the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Columbia University and Northeastern University.

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  • Coronavirus has lifted the work-from-home stigma. How will that shape the future?

    Barbara Larson, a management professor at Northeastern University, also said she expected a trend toward less density in the office for at least the next year or two in industries in which remote work was feasible.

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  • How To Make Sense of All The COVID-19 Projections? A New Model Combines Them

    The latest update — released Tuesday — incorporates eight models, including some oft-cited ones, such as those built by the Imperial College London, the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Columbia University and Northeastern University.

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  • Healey, linking air pollution to COVID-19 disparities, calls for action

    The AG’s report also sought to link current public health conversations with those about the impending climate crisis. Whether facing the coronavirus now or a serious natural disaster in the future, poor and minority communities are “the first and worst impacted,” said Shalanda Baker, a professor at Northeastern University School of Law.

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  • Coronavirus: new survey shows how Republicans and Democrats are responding differently

    Costas Panagopoulos Department Chair and Professor of Political Science , Northeastern University…

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  • How COVID-19 is exposing — and widening — cracks in the US health system

    The interdependent relationship between health and housing creates a relentless cycle, according to Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University.

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  • Our cities may never look the same again after the pandemic

    If they do, the widely-publicized six-foot distancing guidelines could redefine the layout and spacing of new public facilities, according to Northeastern University’s Sara Jensen Carr, whose forthcoming book “The Topography of Wellness” considers how urban landscapes have been transformed by epidemics like cholera, tuberculosis and obesity.

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  • Every conversation about reopening should be about testing

    “This is supply chain 101. This is operations 101,” Nada Sanders, a supply chain management expert at Northeastern University, told me. “It’s so simple. And it’s just not happening.”…

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  • COVID-19 is exposing cracks in the US health system, experts say

    The interdependent relationship between health and housing creates a relentless cycle, according to Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University.

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  • You’ll Probably Never Know If You Had the Coronavirus in January

     Alessandro Vespignani, a network scientist and public-health professor at Northeastern University, estimates that in each American city that later became a hot spot for COVID-19, perhaps 10 to 20 “local transmission events” occurred in January.

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  • New evidence suggests the coronavirus was likely spreading in the US and France as early as December

    A model from researchers at Northeastern University suggests that the coronavirus had started spreading in New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Boston, and Seattle by early February. Thousands of people were probably unknowingly contracting the disease, The New York Times reported.

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  • In Defense of a Good Cry, and Other Options for ‘Losing It’

    “Crying can be very cathartic because when you cry, you are taking deep breaths,” said Lisa Feldman Barrett, professor of psychology at Northeastern University and author of “How Emotions Are Made.” She added that those big gulps between sobs most likely increase activity in the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps to calm us down.

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  • Travel From New York City Seeded Wave of U.S. Outbreaks

    “I would say this is not surprising in a sense,” said Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University in Boston. “The picture emerging is consistent with numerical models.”…

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  • Why unreliable tests are flooding the coronavirus conversation

    “It’s very difficult to really figure out what’s going on,” says Samuel Scarpino, who heads Northeastern University’s Emerging Epidemics Lab. “What we’re facing here are some numbers that are being reported without the context necessary to interpret them.”…

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  • Are we now coming down from the coronavirus plateau?

    “It certainly looks that way,” said Samuel Scarpino, a mathematical epidemiologist at Northeastern University, in an interview Tuesday. “And it’s consistent with the model-based forecasts that have come out of multiple groups in the Boston area, and it’s consistent with the governor’s forecast.”…

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  • The Search Is On for America’s Earliest Coronavirus Deaths

    The Santa Clara death “was a kind of smoking gun that things actually started in January,” said Northeastern University physicist Alessandro Vespignani.

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  • The Covid-19 Pandemic Shows the Virtues of Net Neutrality

    Comcast and Charter, the two largest cable broadband providers in the US, kept average internet speeds fairly steady despite the surge of gaming and video, without throttling major streaming video services, according to preliminary data from researchers at Northeastern University.

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  • Maze parks to micromarkets: How coronavirus could bring cities closer to home

    Sara Jensen Carr, assistant architecture professor at Boston’s Northeastern University, said cholera and yellow fever outbreaks resulted in the building of underground wastewater systems and green spaces like New York City’s Central Park.

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  • Mathematical models help predict the trajectory of the coronavirus outbreak. But can they be believed?

    She works with a group at Northeastern University whose high-powered model is already trying to find some answers. …

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  • How to measure your nation’s response to coronavirus

    “By the time they detected the tip of the iceberg, unfortunately, there were thousands of infections in several cities,” says Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Why America’s coronavirus testing barely improved in April

    The good news is that the work of addressing supply bottlenecks should be relatively straightforward. “This is supply chain 101. This is operations 101,” Nada Sanders, a supply chain management expert at Northeastern University, told me. “It’s so simple. And it’s just not happening.”…

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  • Where The Latest COVID-19 Models Think We’re Headed — And Why They Disagree

    The Northeastern Univ. model is projecting between 74K and 91K deaths in the U.S. by May 23, with an average of 79K. …

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  • How to talk to your neighbors about social distancing

    Aziza Ahmed, a professor of law at Northeastern University in Boston, said what while some state shelter-in-place orders specify fines and incarceration for violations, each state can choose how strictly to enforce the rules.

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  • Trump’s social distancing guidelines quietly expire as the administration shifts focus to reopening

    Wendy Parmet, a Northeastern University law professor who specializes in health care and bioethics, said the expiration of the guidelines doesn’t change much as states are already calling the shots on when to lift restrictions. …

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  • COVID-19 forecasts paint grim spring picture for Mass., death projections up as other states open up

    One powerful reminder of how well social distancing curbs infectious disease comes from another forecasting model with a local partner, Northeastern University. …

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  • Americans grade Trump’s COVID-19 response worse than every state governor, poll finds

    The president’s nationwide approval rating for the coronavirus response was 44% while 40% disapproved, according to the poll conducted for Northeastern University, Harvard University and Rutgers University researchers. It surveyed 22,912 people in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., from April 17-26.

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  • GOP governors who took the coronavirus seriously saw a huge polling bump. Trump didn’t and is tanking.

    Similarly, a massive survey of 22,000 Americans conducted by researchers at Harvard, Northeastern University, and Rutgers University, showed respondents in all 50 states approved of their governors’ handling of the coronavirus pandemic more highly than Trump. …

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  • Poll: Most Mainers support continued shutdown with 1 in 5 affected by layoffs

    The survey of nearly 320 Maine residents was conducted between April 16 and 26 by the COVID-19 Consortium, a group of researchers from Northeastern, Harvard and Rutgers University, as part of a 50-state survey.

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  • California closes Orange county beaches over Covid-19 fears – but how risky is a beach day?

    Wendy Parmet, a Northeastern University health policy expert, said governments need to consider “harm reduction” when weighing the costs of reopening: “We are never going to get social interactions to zero, so how do we reduce the ones that are high risk?” California needs to avoid the complete “renormalization of social interaction”, but the state must reckon with the “quarantine fatigue” that many are feeling, she said.

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  • Did you already have coronavirus in January or February?

    “The initial introduction of the virus in the U.S. coincided with the peak of the flu season, so the symptoms you had, it would be difficult to untangle with flu,” said Matteo Chinazzi, an associate research scientist at Northeastern University in Boston, who is on a team that has been modeling the virus’ spread around the world.

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  • Top coronavirus model predicts 100,000 dead by the end of the pandemic’s 1st wave this summer

    By the end of the coronavirus’s “first wave” this summer, America will likely have buried close to 100,000 victims of the disease, with as many as 9 million people having become infected, according to Alessandro Vespignani, the director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • How to Help Sibling Relationships Grow Stronger During Quarantine

    “Sibling relationships are pretty safe,” says Laurie Kramer, professor of applied psychology at Northeastern University. “You can have huge fights, wake up and they’ll be there. These relationships can often withstand really negative stuff.”…

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  • Here’s why coronavirus is being classified as a biological agent

    “While on the one hand, there is no question that a serious pandemic such as we are experiencing can have an enormous effect on the national security of a country, it’s really also important to understand the differences between a naturally occurring disease and, you know, an act of war,” said Wendy Parmet, director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University.

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  • Quarantinis, covidiots, and social distancing: What the new vocabulary of coronavirus says about these times

    “Language is always in a state of evolution to meet the needs of its users,” said Adam Cooper, a Northeastern University linguistics professor.

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  • A Scramble for Virus Apps That Do No Harm

    “We’ve already learned what moving fast and breaking things can do to society,” said Woodrow Hartzog, a professor of law and computer science at Northeastern University, referring to the negative consequences of a tech mind-set that values speed and disruption above all else.

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  • Worried your cloth mask isn’t filtering coronavirus? This simple hack could make it more effective

    The Northeastern researchers found that adding the nylon layer improved the performance of a DIY mask by between 15% and 50%.

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  • Everything to Know About the Coronavirus in the United States

    Additionally, new research suggests that COVID-19 cases were spreading rapidly in the U.S. far earlier than was reported: researchers at Northeastern University estimate that on March 1, when New York confirmed its first case of coronavirus, more than 10,000 people in the state may already have been infected. …

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  • What To Do When People Don’t Practice Social Distancing

    “In these moments of uncertainty we all suddenly feel the need to police our own behavior, but also police other people’s behavior as well,” says Northeastern University health law professor Aziza Ahmed.

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  • Covid-19 Was Here Earlier Than Most Americans Thought. Now What?

    “This is in line with our projections,” says Kate Coronges, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • Northeastern model shows Boston’s coronavirus outbreak began much earlier than previously thought

    “Between the second half of January and the first half of February,” there were likely enough infected people in Boston “to generate local transmission,” said Alessandro Vespignani, the principal investigator behind the Northeastern model.

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  • Upgrade your homemade coronavirus face mask by adding this basic clothing item

    The pantyhose creates a snugger fit around the wearer’s face, sealing in the loose edges of the masks, said Loretta Fernandez, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Northeastern University and one of the study’s authors.

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  • How to clean, reuse or hack a coronavirus mask

    Preliminary results from a study by researchers at Northeastern University show that sewn fabric masks can in some cases approach the filtration efficiency of commercially produced masks.

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  • How you talk about coronavirus actually impacts its spread

    The data sets and models that scientists and officials work with to try to track or predict the spread of COVID-19 are woefully incomplete or misunderstood, argues Scarpino, a physics professor at  Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Studies Show Coronavirus Spread Earlier Than We Knew

    Dr. Alessandro Vespignani is the director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University in Boston. …

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  • How to make a face mask using what you already have at home

    A new study from Northeastern University, which has not yet been peer reviewed, suggests that wrapping a layer of nylon tights around the outside of homemade face masks offers even better protection. …

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  • Improve Your Face Masks With One Simple Item You Probably Have in Your Drawers

    According to NPR, research conducted at Northeastern University found that adding an outer layer of nylon pantyhose to DIY face masks (or ones you’ve purchased online) improves protection and, in some cases, matched or exceeded the efficacy of surgical masks, especially because the additional fabric keeps the mask tight to your face.

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  • As States Reopen, Health Experts Seek To Understand Coronavirus’s Early Silent Spread

    For researchers and practitioners who’ve been tracking the virus’s spread, the earlier deaths in Santa Clara County are proof that there were “invisible chains of transmission” occurring in various U.S. cities in mid-January, says Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • Adding a layer of nylon stocking could make DIY coronavirus masks more protective

    Researchers at Northeastern University made their findings public this week, even though their work has yet to be peer-reviewed. NPR writes that it “was posted Wednesday on the scientific preprint site medRxiv and on the university’s website in the interest of sharing information quickly in the midst of a pandemic.” The news station also spoke to scientists who “praised” the work as very needed.

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  • Protecting Against COVID-19

    After the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, researchers were basically looking to see what kind of household items you could use at home to protect yourself against breathing in nuclear fallout. Here’s scientist Loretta Fernandez of Northeastern University.

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  • Northeastern University Model Shows COVID-19 Spread In Boston In February

    Models from Northeastern University show coronavirus may have been spreading in the United States earlier than the government thought. “In the United States, the most internationally connected places are the ones that started the epidemic first, and so we are talking about New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle. Those places we are talking about thousands of infections by early March, end of February,” said Alessandro Vespignani, lead modeling researcher and director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University. …

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  • Models Show ‘Hidden Outbreak’ Spread Weeks Before U.S. Took Action To Slow The Coronavirus

    Modeling from Northeastern University publicized this week suggests thousands of cases may have spread undetected throughout New York, Boston, San Francisco, Chicago and Seattle in January and February — long before those cities and others registered an official case count or implemented social distancing measures.

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  • WHO launches ambitious global project to develop Covid-19 medical products

    Even if billions of dollars are pledged, many questions and barriers persist, according to Brook Baker, a professor at Northeastern University School of Law and a senior policy analyst for the Health GAP advocacy group.

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  • TRUMP’S IMMIGRATION POLICIES ARE MAKING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC WORSE | OPINION

    Tiffany D. Joseph, Ph.D., is an associate professor of sociology at Northeastern University.

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  • Boston Had One Confirmed COVID Case on March 1. There May Have Been 2,300 More

    The model, conceived by Dr. Alessandro Vespignani and a research team at Northeastern’s Network Science Institute, was highlighted in a New York Times story this week. …

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  • Northeastern University scientist reports US is flattening the curve, but must be patient

    While the United States is flattening the curve of coronavirus cases, the country must continue to be patient, Northeastern University Network Science Institute director Alessandro Vespignani advised Friday.

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  • New model says U.S. had coronavirus outbreaks before previously thought

    A new pandemic model out of Northeastern University shows that coronavirus outbreaks likely occurred in the U.S. much earlier than previously thought. …

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  • Unseen Covid-19 cases began early, spread fast

    Covid-19 quietly began earlier in the US and spread faster and wider than we realized, back in Feb. when we thought it was only in China and cruise ships.

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  • To Combat Coronavirus, Scientists Are Also Breaking Down Barriers

    “Ultimately it’s about the data,” Lazer said. “But I do think that there is a recognition that this is about people solving a problem, not about accomplishing things in their own discipline. And I think that’s the correct priority.”…

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  • Hidden Outbreaks Spread Through U.S. Cities Far Earlier Than Americans Knew, Estimates Say

    “Meanwhile, in the background, you have this silent chain of transmission of thousands of people,” said Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University in Boston, who led the research team.

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  • Adding A Nylon Stocking Layer Could Boost Protection From Cloth Masks, Study Finds

    “It really improved the performance of all of the masks, and it brought several of them up and over the baseline mask we were using, which was a 3M surgical-type mask,” says Loretta Fernandez, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Northeastern University and one of the scientists who conducted the research.

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  • What 5 Coronavirus Models Say the Next Month Will Look Like

    The other models, including those from Northeastern University and Columbia University, which are built on epidemiological theory, use estimates about how contagious the virus is, how long it takes for people to recover, and what share of infected people with different risk factors will develop a serious illness or die. …

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  • The pandemic may fuel the next wave of the opioid crisis

    Campaigns to get nonviolent drug offenders released during the pandemic may not be sufficient, says Leo Beletsky, professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University.

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  • New York could possibly ease social distancing in beginning of June, model projects

    And that’s the lab’s best case scenario. Meanwhile, the best case scenario charted by experts at Northeastern University in Boston indicated an infection rate of one per 1 million in New York could be even further off, though the online model only goes through the end of this month. …

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  • Ravaged by the coronavirus, Italy tiptoes shakily toward reopening economy

    “Come on, you need to have a plan,” said Alessandro Vespignani, an Italian American physicist and expert on mathematical epidemiology at Northeastern University in Boston. “This is like everyone is talking about D-Day but they don’t know if they have ships, soldiers or support. But all everyone is talking about is when is [the date] of D-Day.”…

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  • Quick recovery? Not likely in Massachusetts, as a coronavirus-induced recession stuns economy

    Boston, observes Northeastern University president Joseph Aoun, is well positioned to thrive in a world in which protecting public health will be paramount. That plays well to the region’s strength as a medical-industrial powerhouse anchored by academic research hospitals and biotechnology firms.

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  • Coronavirus: AI steps up in battle against Covid-19

    In the US, a partnership between Northeastern University’s Barabasi Labs, Harvard Medical School, the Network Science Institute and biotech start-up Scipher Medicine is also on the search for drugs that can quickly be repurposed as Covid-19 treatments.

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  • State modeling shows up to 4,300 Mass. residents could die from coronavirus. How does that compare to other causes of death?

    State officials have disputed the projections of the group at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, as has Samuel Scarpino, a professor in the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University.

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  • Adding A Nylon Stocking Layer Could Boost Protection From Cloth Masks, Study Finds

    Researchers at Northeastern University have found that adding an outer layer made from nylon stockings to a homemade face covering can boost its ability to filter out small particles in the air by creating a tighter seal between the mask and the wearer’s face. In some cases, that extra nylon layer helped homemade cloth masks match or exceed the filtering capability of medical-grade surgical masks.

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  • Neighbors Not Practicing Social Distancing? Here’s What to Do

    “Most people are trying to act in the best way they know how in the context of not knowing too much about a virus that’s killing a lot of people,” said Aziza Ahmed, professor of law at the Northeastern University School of Law and an expert on health law.

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  • Protective equipment costs increase over 1,000% amid competition and surge in demand

    Nada Sanders, a distinguished professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University, told CNN the supply chain for PPE is a “free-for-all.”…

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  • To start reopening shuttered nations, we need this blood test

    “The more accurately we know the percentage of individuals that are infected, the more specific we can be around the recommendations,” says Samuel Scarpino, who runs the Emergent Epidemics Lab at Northeastern University.

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  • State Alliances Are Leading the US Fight Against Covid-19

    “If one state opens up— whatever that means—in a way that the other states are not ready to do, it could cause a catastrophe,” says Wendy Parmet, director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University. “The virus doesn’t pay a toll on the George Washington Bridge.”…

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  • State, local experts push back on university’s bleaker coronavirus forecast

    Samuel Scarpino, a professor in the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, also takes issue with the University of Washington model, which he said has some built-in weaknesses.

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  • Ending coronavirus lockdowns will be a dangerous process of trial and error

    And foreign visitors are generally harder to trace than citizens and more likely to stay at hotels and visit potential transmission hot spots, says Alessandro Vespignani, a disease modeler at Northeastern University. “As soon as you reopen to travelers, that could be something that the contact tracing system is not able to cope with,” he says.

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  • ‘Sobering’ Estimates Mean Mass. Is Budgeting With Billions Less

    Addressing a question raised by Northeastern University economist Alan Clayton-Matthews about taxing stimulus checks, Rodrigues said, “We are not considering any new tax policy.”…

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  • Our Pandemic Summer

    “The medium term is going to be particularly perilous,” said Nada Sanders, a professor of supply-chain management at Northeastern University. “Global demand is so high, and supply is so far behind, that it’s very hard to envision enough of a ramp-up.” “Even for diseases we’ve been studying for over 100 years, like whooping cough, we still don’t know what level of antibody would indicate that you’d be protected if you got reexposed,” said Sam Scarpino of Northeastern University, who studies infectious-disease dynamics. The only way to find out is through long studies.

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  • States Move to Coordinate on Reopening Plans

    “The president can’t magically make them go away,” said Wendy Parmet, a public-health law professor at Northeastern University in Boston. “They’re not his orders.”…

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  • Smart lifts, lonely workers, no towers or tourists: architecture after coronavirus

    “Density is still a very fraught subject in the US,” says Sara Jensen Carr, an architecture professor at Northeastern University in Boston and author of the forthcoming book, The Topography of Wellness: Health and the American Urban Landscape.

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  • Standing Too Close. Not Covering Coughs. If Someone Is Violating Social Distancing Rules, What Do You Do?

    “Everyone is stressed out and fearful for their own health,” says Northeastern University law professor Aziza Ahmed, an expert in health law. “We have to be sensitive to what other people have the capacity to do.”…

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  • Coronavirus: The US clothing firms now making gowns and gloves

    But the White House has been notably hands-off when it comes to establishing any co-ordinated, centralised response, says Nada Sanders, professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University.

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  • Universities in Boston area to house health care workers, first responders during the COVID-19 crisis

    Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced Thursday that Boston University has made 75 beds available for employees of the Pine Street Inn, a homelessness shelter in the South End, while Northeastern University will have 135 rooms available to Boston first responders who need a place to stay and self-isolate when they’re not working.

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  • Why your local store keeps running out of flour, toilet paper and prescription drugs

    Nada R. Sanders Distinguished Professor of Supply Chain Management, Northeastern University…

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  • Pandemic decision-making: Why Humans aren’t wired to understand the coronavirus

    “When you don’t have enough information or you don’t have accurate information, the fear you’re feeling makes every threat seem much more likely,” said David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • The U.S. Approach to Public Health: Neglect, Panic, Repeat

    “It was like a great forgetting took place,” Wendy Parmet, a public health law scholar at Northeastern University, told me. “As the memory of epidemics faded, individual rights became much more important than collective responsibility.”…

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  • Top public health official says number of dead could be lower as Americans practice social distancing

    The White House also sought advice from Alessandr Vespignani, a professor at Northeastern University. He said his estimates were also “in the ballpark” with the numbers Birx mentioned at the briefing.

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  • Facial recognition is no match for face masks, but things are changing fast

    In an op-ed earlier this week, Northeastern University professor Woodrow Hartzog said face masks are a temporary speed bump for facial recognition.

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  • Early-career scientists at critical career junctures brace for impact of COVID-19

    The disruptions are going to shake up the careers of researchers at all seniority levels, says Lisa Feldman Barrett, a professor at Northeastern University. …

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  • Coronavirus death toll in US likely worse than numbers say

    “Everything we’re doing to flatten the curve has major societal and financial impacts that can increase death rates,” explained Samuel Scarpino, who leads Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab. For instance, he said, there can be “indirect mortalities because a hospital, for example, doesn’t have a ventilator available for a non-COVID-19 patient.”…

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  • Forget panic and angry mobs. During disasters like COVID-19, all we want to do is help

    David DeSteno, a psychology professor at Northeastern University, says that when a disaster strikes, it’s rare to see panic, looting or other anti-social behaviour. “What we find is that in general, the greater percentage of people tend to engage in a kind of co-operative altruism. The phenomenon is called ‘altruism born of suffering.’”…

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  • Don’t Be Fooled by Covid-19 Carpetbaggers

    Samuel Scarpino, a mathematical biologist and assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute, is strongly critical of opinions that are too steeped in credentialism…

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  • These charts show how social distancing could help save lives in Massachusetts

    These charts are based on the models created by epidemiologists from Harvard University, University of Guelph and Northeastern University and the state’s advisory board of medical experts, which was created last week.

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  • 6.65 million file jobless claims as job market collapses under weight of coronavirus pandemic

    Based on the state’s claims data and other factors, the jobless rate in Massachusetts is probably about 11 to 11.5 percent, said Alan Clayton-Matthews, an economics professor at Northeastern University. It was 2.8 percent in February.

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  • Community newspapers were already in a tough spot. Coronavirus might destroy them

    The Gannett-owned Medford Transcript, for example, no longer has a dedicated staffer, said Dan Kennedy, a Northeastern University journalism professor who lives in that city.

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  • Respiratory Therapists Are On The Frontline Of Coronavirus Battle

    Tom Barnes of Northeastern University’s Master of Science in Respiratory Care Leadership Program tells NPR’s Steve Inskeep that operating a ventilator takes skill and a lot of training.

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  • California appears to be flattening the curve. But its testing lags behind other states

    Wendy Parmet, a Northeastern University health policy expert, said the testing problems made tracking the virus challenging: “You need testing to make sure you quickly identify new outbreaks and trace contacts. Put out the small sparks before they become another conflagration.” …

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  • White House’s Grim COVID-19 Deaths Model ‘Plausible’ For ‘Low End,’ Researcher Says

    Sam Scarpino, a professor of network science who heads up Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab, models coronavirus outbreaks around the world to better inform the game plan for Massachusetts. …

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  • I can’t afford rent for my small business because of COVID-19. What can I do?

    “Small businesses clearly don’t have the leverage that those big chains do,” said Jared Nicholson, director of the Community Business Clinic at Northeastern University School of Law. “While the landlord is going to be willing to cut a deal with a huge customer, the tiny small businesses may not be able to get that kind of break.”…

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  • The coronavirus is washing over the U.S. These factors will determine how bad it gets in each community

    “Part of the reason we found it in Seattle is also an element of bad luck, in the sense that it seemingly quickly jumped into a nursing home, and there were fatalities, so we caught it,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute. …

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  • Shutdowns and stay-at-home orders may be slowing spread of coronavirus, new data show

    Since that spike, the number of new cases has leveled off, but so has the number of tests, noted Northeastern University assistant professor Samuel Scarpino. …

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  • Why It’s So Freaking Hard To Make A Good COVID-19 Model

    Sam Scarpino, a professor at Northeastern University who models infectious diseases, described these as “superspreader events” — situations where some factor, usually something to do with the location rather than the people themselves, boosts the number of cases in a sudden burst. …

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  • Adjusting to life during a pandemic

    Dr. Kristen Lee is the lead faculty for behavioral science at Northeastern University.

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  • When Will It Peak? Predicted Timeline for Coronavirus Surge in Each New England State

    “I think that number is probably optimistic,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University who studies networks and complex systems, including the spread of infectious diseases.

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  • Boston police incidents drop as coronavirus prevention measures take hold

    “The vast majority of the decline…to the Boston Police would have to do with the fact that people are not outside, they’re not having encounters with strangers,” said James Alan Fox, a criminology professor at Northeastern University.

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  • Social Media Posts and Online Searches Hold Vital Clues about Pandemic Spread

    The most immediate challenge is getting it right. “It’s actually really hard to get useful prospective data from social media,” says Northeastern University computer scientist Clark Freifeld, who cofounded HealthMap with Brownstein.

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  • States Restrict Travelers from Coronavirus ‘Hot Zones’

    Wendy Parmet, a public-health law professor at Northeastern University in Boston, said travel restrictions or measures at the state level can be discriminatory. She said the Constitution gives the power to regulate interstate travel and commerce to the federal government, not the states.

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  • Resiliency Expert: ‘This Is A Pearl Harbor Moment’

    That’s according to Stephen Flynn, founding director of the Global Resilience Institute and professor at Northeastern University. He’s also a professor of political science.

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  • A Tiny Island Tries to Shut Out the Virus

    Wendy Parmet, Distinguished Professor of Law, Public Policy, and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University, agrees. “Even where local authorities have very broad home rule and emergency power, you can still make the case they are exercising it in a discriminatory way,” Parmet says. “That’s going to be deeply problematic from a legal perspective.”…

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  • Isolation is hazardous to your health. The term ‘social distancing’ doesn’t help

    That’s the case being made by Daniel Aldrich, director of the security and resilience program at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Pressure mounts to widen access to medical products that may combat Covid-19

    “The danger is exclusive rights can mitigate universal access needed to respond to the pandemic quickly, so we’re trying to change the rules of the game, but we’re playing catch-up in some cases,” said Brook Baker, a professor at Northeastern University School of Law and a senior policy analyst for the Health GAP advocacy group.

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  • Tracking the pandemic? There’s an app for that.

    “Norms and expectations about this differ from country to country,” said David Lazer, professor of political science and computer and information science at Northeastern University in Boston. …

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  • Experts: Trump’s plan to lift coronavirus restrictions by Easter would kill hundreds of thousands

    “We need to remember that some of the people who are suggesting this are the same people who said there was no problem, and this was just the common cold,” Wendy Parmet, a Northeastern University law professor who specializes in health care and bioethics, told Stat News.

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  • Without A Statewide Stay-At-Home Mandate, Florida Braces For COVID-19 Wave

    Samuel Scarpino’s working with a group at Northeastern University that’s modeling the pandemic.

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  • Could we really end the coronavirus crisis in two weeks if we stopped all interaction? Sorry, no. Here’s why

    But it wasn’t 14 days, it was more like two months before things really started to come back to normal,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute, who is studying the pandemic using mathematical and computational modeling.

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  • You’ve Tested Positive for COVID-19. Who Has a Right to Know?

    In some instances, people can sue others for making them sick, explains Aziza Ahmed, a professor of law at Northeastern University. …

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  • Meet the International Team Mapping the Real-Time Spread of the Coronavirus

    “We didn’t necessarily anticipate in early January that this was going to become a pandemic,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute and a member of the collaboration team.

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  • What Are The Legal Implications Of Gov. Baker’s Emergency Coronavirus Orders?

    WGBH Morning Edition host Joe Mathieu spoke with Northeastern University law professor and WGBH News legal analyst Daniel Medwed on Tuesday to learn more about how officials plan to craft and enforce the advisory.

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  • Trump Wants to Reopen America ‘By Easter.’ But That’s (Mostly) Up to the States, Not the President

    Under the U.S. Constitution, states have “an inherent power to take actions to protect the health and wellbeing” of their residents, says Wendy E. Parmet, director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University.

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  • Meet the International Team Mapping the Real-Time Spread of the Coronavirus

    “We didn’t necessarily anticipate in early January that this was going to become a pandemic,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute and a member of the collaboration team.

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  • Is ‘social distancing’ the wrong term? Expert prefers ‘physical distancing,’ and the WHO agrees.

    The government, media organizations and meme creators have all embraced the term “social distancing” when discussing how to stem the coronavirus pandemic. But Daniel Aldrich, a professor of political science and public policy at Northeastern University, is concerned that the term is misleading and that its widespread usage could be counterproductive. The World Health Organization has come to the same conclusion. Last week, it started using the term Aldrich prefers: “physical distancing.”…

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  • Virus Rules Let Construction Workers Keep Building Luxury Towers

    Construction sites are particularly dynamic workplaces, with new workers coming and going all the time, greatly increasing the number of people who come in contact with one another, said Jack Dennerlein, a professor at Northeastern University whose research includes health and safety issues in the construction industry.

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  • How New York’s spiraling coronavirus outbreak could affect Mass.

    With 1,159 cases and 11 deaths so far, Massachusetts is already experiencing its own local outbreak, which is likely driving the state epidemic’s growth far more than any potential spillover from New York, said Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University.

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  • Social distancing, politicized: Trump allies are urging an end to isolation, worrying public health experts

    Attitudes like Falwell’s represent “an absurdly callous perspective,” said Wendy Parmet, a Northeastern University law professor who specializes in health care and bioethics.

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  • Density Is Normally Good for Us. That Will Be True After Coronavirus, Too.

    “This does feel like something that’s going to set all of that back a little bit,” said Sara Jensen Carr, a professor of architecture, urbanism and landscape at Northeastern University.

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  • How firms move to secret offices amid Covid-19

    Although some firms have spent huge sums of money to ensure they have backup offices ready and waiting, it’s important to realise that this is a luxury, says Daniel Aldrich, director of the security and resilience program at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.

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  • An economy put in a ‘medically-induced coma’

    Michael Goodman, an economic sociologist and director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, says the best way to understand things was offered recently by Northeastern University economist Alan Clayton-Matthews, who said we’ve opted to put the global economy into a “medically-induced coma.” How the patient will fare is now anybody’s guess. …

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  • Journaling during the pandemic, for yourself and the historians

    “Digital media and technology is amazing in many ways, but it also has a lot of problems,” said Dan Cohen, the dean of libraries at Northeastern University, whose extensive documentation of firsthand accounts following the Sept. 11 attacks is in the Library of Congress. “A physical diary, if you stick it in your attic, you’ll likely be able to read that in a century or two. That really doesn’t happen with digital media.”…

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  • How the Virus Got Out

    Alessandro Vespignani, professor and director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University•  Alessandro Vespignani, professor and director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University…

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  • Cellphone tracking could help stem the spread of coronavirus. Is privacy the price?

    For example, a basic symptom-checking app could do more than just keeping people who don’t need urgent care out of overstretched emergency rooms, says Samuel Scarpino, an epidemiologist at Northeastern University. Health researchers could use also use location data from the app to estimate the size of an outbreak. “That could be done, I think, without risking being evil,” he says.

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  • Coronavirus and the contagion of fear

    David DeSteno is a psychology professor at Northeastern University who’s studied how fear can drive us batty. “We’re supposed to be the rational animal,” he said. “But there’s a lot going on in your head that’s kind of under your conscious radar.”…

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  • Coronavirus Could Overwhelm U.S. Without Urgent Action, Estimates Say

    “You have to think of this as an insurance for the future: The earlier you do it, the greater effect you have on the virus,” said Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, who said the estimates were in line with his own projections. “It’s better to take excessive precautions than not.”…

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  • Will COVID-19 Be A Death Knell For Some News Outlets?

    Emily Rooney was joined via Skype by Northeastern University’s Dan Kennedy to discuss.

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  • Op-Ed: How to mix compassion and cooperation into social distancing

    David DeSteno is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University.

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  • What’s the safest gathering size to slow the coronavirus? There isn’t one.

    When it comes to deciding what to do and what to avoid, however, there is no magic number that is safe for a gathering, says Samuel Scarpino, a complex systems scientist and infectious-disease modeling expert at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Layoffs begin to mount as virus forces Massachusetts economy to shrink

    The economic picture is likely to remain murky for a while, said Alan Clayton-Matthews, a Northeastern University professor and coeditor of Massachusetts Benchmarks, a publication that tracks the state economy.

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  • Coronavirus is turning an overloaded immigration system into a ‘tinderbox’

    “It’s a tinderbox,” said Wendy Parmet, a professor of law and public health at Northeastern University. “Whatever you think about criminal justice reform in the long term, detention and congregation of people in institutional settings is dangerous right now. It’s dangerous for people detained. It’s dangerous for the staff. It’s dangerous for the community who interact with the staff.”…

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  • Have a COVID-19 Question? These Local Health Tech Startups Are Here to Help

    Closer home, Alessandro Vespignani, a modeler of infectious diseases at Northeastern University, alarmed citizens against the virus called it a “beast that’s moving very fast.”…

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  • The best charts for tracking coronavirus, according to visualization experts

     I would add a fourth recommendation: “Stay home in any case, sick or not sick” because we could be unconscious carriers of the virus right now. —Mauro Martino, founder of the Visual AI lab at IBM Research AI and Professor of Practice at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Boston Scientist Says Actual COVID-19 Cases Could Approach 6,000 in Massachusetts

    There are now over 200 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Massachusetts, but the true number could be around 6,000, says Sam Scarpino, a professor of network science who heads up Northeastern University’s Emergent Epidemics Lab.

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  • Can Local Governments Enforce Quarantines? Should They?

    Putting an uncooperative individual in a hospital or a prison could waste resources, such as hospital beds, that could help other people, said Wendy Parmet, a law professor at Northeastern University in Boston.

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  • Mass. official coronavirus count is 218, but experts say true number could now be as high as 6,000

    Another scientist who spoke to the Globe, Samuel Scarpino, a Northeastern University professor who specializes in infectious disease modeling, said he used an algorithm developed by an epidemiologist at Notre Dame University that calculates the United States has only detected between 1 of every 10 cases and 1 in 30 cases, due to its low rate of testing compared to other countries. He said Massachusetts likely has 1,970 to 5,910 or more actual cases.

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  • Undetected Cases May Be Driving Coronavirus Spread, Study Finds

    Travel bans implemented inside China only delayed the spread of the epidemic by three to five days, while international bans halted the spread of coronavirus by about a few weeks, said senior researcher Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, in Boston.

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  • I’m a researcher who’s helped change how we tackle pandemics like coronavirus forever – this is what we’ve learned

    Mathematical modelling is being led by professor Samuel Scarpino of Network Science Institute (NetSI) at Northeastern University and Harvard’s HealthMap team is leading on data visualisation. …

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  • Primary Polling Places Are Full Of Older People … And The Coronavirus

    Primary elections really are a setting at which coronavirus could spread, said Sam Scarpino, a professor of environmental sciences at Northeastern University.

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  • How long should Americans expect to live like this — separated from friends, coworkers and classmates? Experts say they don’t know.

    The answer also depends “on how we respond over the next few days,” said Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University’s Network Science Institute, and “if we increase the amount of social distancing, remote work, school closures, etcetera,” or blithely ignore the advice of public health officials by going to crowded bars and restaurants, as many in Boston and beyond have done over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. …

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  • Coronavirus just dropped white-collar workers in the middle of America’s biggest accidental experiment

    Eddleston at Northeastern University recently published a paper that dissects the link between telecommuting and career success.

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  • The first coronavirus error was complacency

    Indeed, according to research by network scientists at Northeastern University in Massachusetts, the U.S. was the fifth most likely country to import COVID-19 from China, after Thailand, Japan, Taiwan and South Korea. …

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  • Sanitizer. Skip the handshake. No audience. An unusual debate, thanks to coronavirus.

    “They don’t really play a role,” said Alan Schroeder, a professor at Northeastern University’s School of Journalism in Boston and the author of “Presidential Debates: 50 Years of High-Risk TV.”…

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  • Why “social distancing,” if done wrong, can make you more vulnerable

    Yes, it’s critical to follow the Centers for Disease and Control definition, but that doesn’t mean we still can’t be there for each other in different ways. Daniel P. Aldrich, Professor and Director of the Security and Resilience Studies Program, Northeastern University, began studying resilience in disasters after his home was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

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  • How health care inequity could make the COVID-19 crisis worse

    “In effect, the more cases there are, the more risk everyone faces,” Northeastern University public health law expert Wendy Parmet said. “For that reason, we protect everyone by helping the most vulnerable people in our country stay healthy.”…

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  • How this psychologist suggests we manage COVID-19 fears

    Jeffrey Brown talks to David DeSteno, a psychology professor at Northeastern University who studies periods of stress and trauma.

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  • Sticking To The Facts On Coronavirus

    On this week’s edition of Beat The Press, Emily Rooney was joined by Callie Crossley of WGBH News; Mike Nikitas of University of New Hampshire; Jon Keller of WBZ News; and Dan Kennedy of Northeastern University.

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  • Want to Sue Because of a Coronavirus Quarantine? Good Luck

    Wendy Parmet, a health policy and law professor at Northeastern University in Boston, said safety was also outweighing liberty in the minds of those potentially affected by restrictions, at least for now.

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  • President Trump just declared the coronavirus pandemic a national emergency. Here’s what that means

    Beyond the legal and bureaucratic power that national emergency declarations can wield, it may prove most impactful simply by virtue of its source, said Wendy Parmet, a health policy and law professor at Northeastern University.

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  • Trump and states have broad powers to do ‘extraordinary things’ to contain the virus

    “There’s no question that states have very broad powers to do rather extraordinary things in public health emergencies,” professor Wendy Parmet, an expert on public health law at Northeastern University, says.

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  • What’s behind the COVID-19 testing bottleneck

    “The 95 cases we have–that’s where Italy was at two weeks ago,” said Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor of network science who heads the epidemics lab at Northeastern University. “They have 12,000 cases as of this morning, and their hospitals are overrun.”…

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  • How U.S. and Europe can learn from Asia’s battle against coronavirus

    The lockdown of Wuhan likely reduced overseas transmission of the virus by almost 80 percent, according to a paper published in the journal Science on March 6 by a team led by researchers at Northeastern University.

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  • What the U.S. and Europe Can Learn From Asia’s Two-Month Virus Battle

    The lockdown of Wuhan likely reduced overseas transmission of the virus by almost 80%, according to a paper published in the journal Science on March 6 by a team led by researchers at Northeastern University.

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  • Coronavirus: How to work from home, the right way

    “Have really clear-set expectations for communications day to day,” says Barbara Larson, a professor of management at Northeastern University in Boston who studies remote working. “Ask [your manager] if they don’t mind having a 10-minute call to kick off the day and wrap up the day. Often times, managers just haven’t thought of it.”…

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  • Mapping the Social Network of Coronavirus

    The offices of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University sit 10 floors above Boston’s Back Bay. Wraparound windows offer a floating panorama of the city, from Boston Common to Fenway Park, as a half-dozen young analysts toil quietly at computers.

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  • Exclusive: Here’s How Fast the Coronavirus Could Infect Over 1 Million Americans

    “What we’re seeing now is really just the tip of the iceberg,” says Alessandro Vespignani, the director of the Northeastern lab, who worked alongside colleagues Matteo Chinazzi and Ana Pastore y Piontti on this research.

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  • How scientists are crowdsourcing a coronavirus vaccine

    Seth Cooper, the game’s lead designer and an assistant professor at Northeastern’s Khoury College of Computer Sciences, says Foldit was created because the design team figured that people could come up with better solutions than the computer could, and that it’d be helpful for people to interact with the 3-D compositions of protein structures to truly understand how they function.

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  • Can You Be Forced Into Quarantine? Your Questions, Answered

    “We do not want to restrict people’s liberty unless it is necessary, unless we cannot achieve the public health end with less draconian measures,” said Wendy E. Parmet, the director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University.

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  • Covid-19 is rapidly spreading in America. The country does not look ready

    “The idea that people should have skin in the game kind of doesn’t work when you’re also playing with your neighbour’s skin,” says Wendy Parmet, a professor of public-health law at Northeastern University. …

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  • Massachusetts Virus Outbreak Looks Like Italy’s Just Two Weeks Ago

    “Massachusetts is smaller than Italy,” said Sam Scarpino, an assistant professor of network science who heads the epidemics lab at Northeastern. “It has about 100 cases. There were 159 cases in Italy two weeks ago. That’s where we’re headed. We’ve got to move now and decisively prepare hospitals, work remotely and ramp up testing.”…

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  • Is the Coronavirus Changing How We Look At Public Spaces?

    Sara Jensen Carr, an assistant professor of architecture, urbanism, and landscape at Northeastern University, joined The Takeaway to discuss how the coronavirus is impacting the perception of public spaces. …

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  • Why ‘flattening the curve’ may be the world’s best bet to slow the coronavirus

    Alessandro Vespignani, director of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, is gravely worried about what he’s hearing from contacts in Italy, where people initially played down the outbreak as “a kind of flu,” he said. …

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  • ‘We’re not prepared’: coronavirus could devastate homeless communities

    Wendy Parmet, a Northeastern University law professor and health policy expert, said she was concerned that there appeared to be little discussion at the national level about homelessness. …

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  • How China Slowed Coronavirus: Lockdowns, Surveillance, Enforcers

    In a study released March 6, researchers at Northeastern University in Boston said the Wuhan travel ban slowed the pathogen’s spread in China by three days.

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  • Travel restrictions could slow the spread of coronavirus, but they are ‘not enough alone’ to stop it

    Travel restrictions help, but they’re not enough to stop the spread, according to Alessandro Vespignani, a researcher at Northeastern University who models the spread of infectious diseases.

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  • County says a father ignored a coronavirus quarantine directive. His lawyer says he was never told.

    Whether it comes from a person’s doctor or from health officials, a request to self-quarantine is voluntary and lacks legal force, said Wendy Parmet, a health policy and law professor at Northeastern University.

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  • A father ignored coronavirus quarantine directive and took his daughter to a school dance

    Whether it comes from a person’s doctor or from health officials, a request to self-quarantine is voluntary and lacks legal force, said Wendy Parmet, a health policy and law professor at Northeastern University.

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  • How Much of the World Will Be Quarantined by the Coronavirus?

    At the same time, no country can simply quarantine its way out of the covid-19 crisis, Wendy E. Parmet, the director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University, told me. …

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  • Coronavirus: US easing of online course rules omits foreigners

    The Trump administration’s waiver of online course rules to help US colleges cope with the coronavirus outbreak does not appear to cover foreign students, risking public health broadly, Northeastern University has warned.

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  • First U.S. Colleges Close Classrooms as Virus Spreads. More Could Follow.

    Seattle University, with about 7,300 students, also said it would move to online classes for the rest of the winter quarter, and Northeastern University in Boston will do the same for students on its Seattle campus.

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  • Colleges Move Online Amid Virus Fears

    Brandman University, Seattle University and the Seattle campus of Northeastern University have also moved to remote instruction for the time being.

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  • What viral internet memes may tell us about Covid-19’s spread

    “It’s a funny tool,” said the paper’s lead author Samuel Scarpino, an assistant professor at Northeastern University in the US. “We know the model is wrong, but we can still use it early in an outbreak to learn something important about the progression of an epidemic.”…

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  • Behaviour key to coronavirus fightback

    “That means staying home if you’re sick,” Ana Pastore y Piontti, a scientist and study co-author at the Laboratory for Modeling of Biological and Sociotechnical Systems at Northeastern University in the US, said in a university media release. …

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  • With Coronavirus Keeping Them in U.S., International Students Face Uncertainty. So Do Their Colleges.

    In a letter to Chad Wolfe, acting secretary of homeland security, Joseph E. Aoun, president of Northeastern University, which has moved classes on its Seattle campus online, called on the government to loosen the regulations. …

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  • With Coronavirus, ‘Health Care for Some’ Is a Recipe for Disaster

    In 2018, before Covid-19 was known to humans, when the public charge rule was still just a proposal, Wendy Parmet, a professor of law and public health at Northeastern University, warned that the push for immigrant self-sufficiency would be both dangerous and quixotic. …

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  • Coronavirus panic sells as alarmist information flies on social media

    “A link between social contagions and real biological contagions are a feature of modern outbreaks because of misinformation and fake news,” says Samuel Scarpino, a business professor of network science at Northeastern University College of Science.

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  • The US Has a ‘Plan’ to Fight Coronavirus: You

    “The term I’ve been using is ‘metering,’” says Wendy Parmet, director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University. “Hopefully, if you’re slowing it down, maybe more people are sick at the other side of our knowledge curve about treatment.”…

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  • Told to Stay Home, Suspected Coronavirus Patient Attended Event With Dartmouth Students

    “You can’t bring criminal charges for being a bonehead or just not doing what you were told was advisable to do,” said Wendy Parmet, faculty director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University. …

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  • Trump’s immigration policies will make the coronavirus pandemic worse

    Wendy E. Parmet, J.D., is professor of law and director of the Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University School of Law and professor of public policy and urban affairs at Northeastern’s School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs.

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  • Coronavirus: Man who refused to self-isolate and went to party instead tests positive for disease days later

    “You can’t bring criminal charges for being a bonehead or just not doing what you were told was advisable to do,” said Wendy Parmet, faculty director of the Centre for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University. …

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  • Dramatic Impact of Coronavirus Lockdowns Seen from Space

    Law professor and Northeastern University’s Center for Health Policy and Law in Boston, Wendy Parmet said. The extraordinary powers given the government are indeed, “possible, but not probable.”…

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  • What an equitable coronavirus response should look like

    “There’s been a wide number of reports over the last few years of immigrants and people in mixed-status communities foregoing healthcare, avoiding doctors and hospitals prior to this outbreak,” said professor Wendy Parmet, Center for Health Policy and Law Director at Northeastern University, who also signed the ACLU open letter. …

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  • Why a Coronavirus Recession Would Be So Hard to Contain

    That means American companies that rely heavily on Chinese suppliers might begin facing shortages of key goods in the weeks ahead, said Nada Sanders, professor of supply chain management at Northeastern University.

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  • Northeastern Researcher Helps CDC Predict Coronavirus Spread With Mapping Technology

    He’s a Northeastern University researcher whose mapping technology predicts the spread of infectious diseases like COVID-19. “The next few weeks is a crucial time,” Vespignani said.

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  • Strategies shift as coronavirus pandemic looms

    “The fight now is to mitigate, keep the health care system working, and don’t panic,” adds Alessandro Vespignani, an infectious disease modeler at Northeastern University.

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  • The Coronavirus Scare: This Time Is Different

    Epidemiologists simply don’t have enough data to even put reasonable odds on that, says Alessandro Vespignani, an infectious disease modeler at Northeastern University. …

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  • Why travel restrictions aren’t stopping the coronavirus

    Matteo Chinazzi, a network scientist at Northeastern University, has co-developed a way to judge the effectiveness of COVID-19 travel bans.

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  • Here’s How Computer Models Simulate the Future Spread of New Coronavirus

    Alessandro Vespignani, a physicist and director of the Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-technical Systems at Northeastern University, leads a team that is simulating the novel coronavirus’s spread using official air-travel data and predicted commuting patterns among census populations.

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  • What’s in a Name? Why WHO’s Formal Name for the New Coronavirus Disease Matters

    If the new name had included a reference to Wuhan it would put a “tremendous stigmatization on the people of Wuhan who are the victims” of the disease, Wendy Parmet, a law professor at Northeastern University and public health expert, tells TIME.

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  • How Fear Distorts Our Thinking About the Coronavirus

    David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University and a visiting fellow at Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership, is the author of “Emotional Success: The Power of Gratitude, Compassion, and Pride.”…

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  • Three Scenarios For The Coronavirus

    Those cases might escape quarantine and increase the spread of the disease, making it “very difficult to stop in China,” Alessandro Vespignani, an infectious disease expert at Northeastern University, told Science.

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  • Will novel virus go pandemic or be contained?

    Asymptomatic people are hard to find and isolate, so if they can spread disease, 2019-nCoV “will be very difficult to stop in China,” says Alessandro Vespignani, a modeler of infectious diseases at Northeastern University. But if asymptomatic transmission is rare, he says, “isolation and social distancing can have a big impact.”…

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  • ‘This beast is moving very fast.’ Will the new coronavirus be contained—or go pandemic?

    But is containment realistic? Success will depend in part on whether infected people who don’t have symptoms can spread the virus. Asymptomatic people are hard to find and isolate, so if they can spread disease, 2019-nCoV “will be very difficult to stop in China,” says Alessandro Vespignani, a modeler of infectious diseases at Northeastern University. …

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  • Coronavirus: could the US government’s quarantine and travel ban backfire?

    “I worry that what we’re seeing is more showboating and a quarantine to look tough,” said Wendy Parmet, a Northeastern University law professor and health policy expert. “Quarantines and travel bans have a really, really ugly history. Everyone always wants to do it when people are scared. But the downsides are high and the risks are high.”…

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  • U.S. Coronavirus Quarantine And Travel Limits: Needed Protection Or Overreaction?

    “It backfires because people head for the hills,” says Wendy Parmet, a professor of health law policy at Northeastern University. “People don’t call and seek health care when they might be becoming sick. And health care providers become fearful of treating patients because they don’t want to get caught up in the quarantine.”…

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  • Experts Race to Figure Out How Contagious the Coronavirus Is

    A study led by a researcher from Boston’s Northeastern University—using mathematical probability models based on travel patterns and confirmed international cases—estimated the median number of infections in Wuhan at 31,200 as of Wednesday, compared with that day’s official tally of 2,261.

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  • Coronavirus: first cases of human to human transmission confirmed

    A study by researchers at Northeastern University in the United States uses mathematical models to calculate that there are about 25,000 infections in China, more than five times the amount estimated by the government.

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