Skip to content

Alumna becomes first woman to compete in NHL skills competition

Photo: Northeastern alumna Kendall Coyne Schofield made hockey history on Friday night, when she became the first woman to compete in the National Hockey League’s skills competition. Photo by Adam Glanzman/Northeastern University

Kendall Coyne Schofield made hockey history on Friday night, when she became the first woman to compete in the National Hockey League’s skills competition.

Coyne Schofield, a Northeastern alumna who won a gold medal for Team USA at the 2018 Winter Olympics, finished seventh out of eight participants in the fastest skater contest.

She replaced Colorado Avalanche forward Nathan MacKinnon, whose bruised foot prevented him from participating in the competition, which was held at the SAP Center in San Jose, California, during the NHL’s All Star Weekend.

“It was electrifying, the USA chants. I’m pretty tired but awesome to be here,” Coyne Schofield said in a televised interview on NBC Sports Network moments after she had raced around the rink in 14.346 seconds.

Coyne Schofield plays for the Minnesota Whitecaps of the National Women’s Hockey League, and has scored five goals in 11 games this season.

She ranks first in Northeastern hockey history with 141 goals and 249 points. She finished her collegiate career as the all-time leading scorer in Hockey East play, and set conference records for scoring 30 goals and racking up 55 points during her senior season in 2015-16.

She also earned the Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award in 2016, which recognizes the top player in NCAA Division 1 women’s hockey.

Cookies on Northeastern sites

This website uses cookies and similar technologies to understand your use of our website and give you a better experience. By continuing to use the site or closing this banner without changing your cookie settings, you agree to our use of cookies and other technologies. To find out more about our use of cookies and how to change your settings, please go to our Privacy Statement.

Like what you see? Sign up for our daily newsletter to get the latest stories right in your inbox.