Across the street from Amazon headquarters, flanked by a prestigious biology institute on one side and a Filipino-Vietnamese food truck on the other, sitsa storefront in a booming biotech enclave of the city. The space is decked in red and white, with modernist lounge chairs and molecule-shaped sculptures suspended from the ceiling.

Welcome to Northeastern University Seattle. Yes, the once-humble commuter school along Huntington Avenue in Boston has a year-old satellite campus 3,000 miles away in the far Northwest corner of the country. It offers master’s degrees, mostly, that are either partially or entirely online and cater to people looking to get ahead in Seattle’s technology-fueled economy.

Northeastern also has a two-year-old satellite campus in Charlotte, N.C., and more in development — another on the West Coast, one in Canada, and one in Western Europe.

Along with Northeastern’s growing roster of online-only degrees, these faraway outposts represent a massive, and controversial, ambition on the part of the college and its president, Joseph E. Aoun, to serve the workforce, build the Northeastern brand, and position a formerly modest local institution for global competition.