Is this just the promise of an idealistic social worker? In some ways I fit that stereotype. Shapeless dresses, check. Chunky jewelry, check. Optimist, check. But idealist? No, I shed that mantle long ago. I work with women who have perinatal emotional complications, so I no longer have the luxury of being an idealist. (Perinatal emotional complications are feelings and behaviors that cause mothers distress and interfere with their functioning, including depression and anxiety across a spectrum of severity; the spectrum includes normal pregnancy and postpartum adjustment and stress, as well as baby blues, depression, anxiety, and panic disorders.) I have to change worlds–mothers, babies, fathers, partners, grandparents, co-workers, and employers are relying on it. Before I went into social work, I was an idealist; I wanted to change the world. But as you might have noticed, the world is a big place; I quickly grew tired. However, throughout my training I was taken with the realization that changing one person’s world would change the worlds of others around them, and I never looked back.