National University in San Diego announced Tuesday it would pay the tuition costs for its active-duty military students during October and November while the federal government remains shut down. The shutdown has halted military tuition assistance programs, and each branch of the armed forces remains unable to process applications until Congress passes a spending measure.

“We are not going to allow a government shutdown to adversely impact the academic pursuits of our active duty military students,” NU President Michael Cunningham said in a statement. “Our nation has a shortage of citizens with four-year and advanced degrees. To maintain our position in the global economy we must continue to ensure those who want to pursue a degree have the opportunity to do so, especially those who have served our country so honorably.”

Military members make up nearly 13 percent of NU’s 30,000 students. The university was founded in 1971 by David Chigos, a retired United States Navy lieutenant commander.

A number of other colleges have announced similar tuition help. City University of Seattle, a private institution, said it will not hold active-duty military membersfinancially responsible for classes taken during their fall quarter, if tuition assistance is not provided retroactively. Joseph Aoun, president of Northeastern University in Boston, announced his school will not hold active-duty members of the armed forces “responsible for tuition charges incurred as a result of the shutdown for the time being.”