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  • Low B12 seen in aging, autism and schizophrenia

    Yahoo! - 02/10/2016

    For the elderly, this decline might not be a bad thing. Lower levels at advanced ages may offer some degree of brain protection by slowing cellular reactions and the production of DNA-damaging chemicals called free radicals, Deth said. In previous work with his colleague Yiting Zhang of Northeastern University in Boston, Deth found that the body’s creation of biologically active forms of vitamin B12 produces free radicals as a waste product.

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