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  • Life in Antarctica’s ice Mirrors Human Disease

    Nature World News - 06/11/2019

    “Many species have evolved traits that are adaptive in their environment but are similar to disease states in humans,” says Jake Daane, lead author of the study (Northeastern University). “We use this natural variation to better understand the genetic mechanisms of disease.”

    “Antarctic notothenioids don’t have swim bladders to adjust their buoyancy in the water column. Rather, they use reductions in bone density to help them ‘float’ in the water column at low energetic cost,” says co-author Bill Detrich (coauthor, Northeastern University). “What is a genetic disease state in us is a means of survival in these fishes.” 

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