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Photo: SALT LAKE CITY—Northeastern guard Shawn Occeus is met by a crowd of Jayhawks as he drives the lane in the Huskies' 87-53 first-round loss to Kansas in the NCAA Tournament. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

Full coverage of Northeastern's run in the 2019 NCAA men's basketball tournament

After winning the Colonial Athletic Association conference tournament, the Northeastern men’s basketball team earned a bid in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2015. But the underdog Huskies fell to 4th-seeded Kansas University in the first round of March Madness. Here are the stories of Northeastern’s NCAA tournament run.

Here’s why the Huskies may return to March Madness next year

Junior guard Jordan Roland, seen here driving against Kansas in the NCAA Tournament on Thursday, is one of many key players returning for the Huskies next year. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

SALT LAKE CITY—Northeastern senior center Anthony Green could not hide his emotions as he sat in the quiet locker room after the Huskies’ 87-53 loss to Kansas in the opening game of the NCAA Tournament on Thursday. The fourth-seeded Jayhawks had shut the door on his college career with abrupt finality, but at the same time he was proud of all that he and his teammates have built.

With 23 wins each of the last two seasons, as well as their recent title in the Colonial Athletic Association tournament, which carried them into March Madness for the second time in five years, the 13th-seeded Huskies are looking to next year from a position of newfound strength.

The Huskies hope to grow from their NCAA Tournament experiences in Salt Lake City against the highly-rated Jayhawks. Photos by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

“It didn’t end how any of us wanted, especially the seniors,” Green said of himself, point guard Vasa Pusica and forward Jeremy Miller, who played their final game for Northeastern. “But we are proud of what we did this year. No one can take away that we are CAA champions and that we earned this spot.”

The Huskies will be expecting to contend for the NCAA Tournament again despite the loss of Pusica, who was first-team All-CAA in each of his two seasons after transferring from the University of San Diego. An obvious candidate to run the Huskies next year will be 6-foot-1-inch Donnell Gresham Jr., who became the primary ballhandler when Pusica missed seven games early this season. Bolden Brace, a versatile 6-foot-6-inch swingman, will assist with the playmaking.

Northeastern will be counting on strong senior leadership in the backcourt from Gresham, Brace, 6-foot-4-inch Shawn Occeus, and 6-foot-1-inch Jordan Roland, who set a school record with 99 3-pointers in his first season after transferring from George Washington University.

The Huskies will continue to benefit defensively from Occeus and Gresham, who are among the best perimeter defenders in the CAA.

While they will miss Green’s size on defense—at 6 feet 9 inches and 252 pounds, he was Northeastern’s only traditional center—his backup, 6-foot-8-inch sophomore Tomas Murphy, is a more versatile scorer.

Junior swingman Maxime Boursiquot, who started 32 games last year but missed this season with an injury, will provide a huge boost at both ends of the court. Redshirt freshmen Shaquille Walters, a 6-foot-6-inch wing, and Greg Eboigbodin, a 6-foot-9-inch sophomore, will bring upside to the Huskies.

Midway through the second half against Kansas, coach Bill Coen made a surprise move by inserting freshman forward Jason Strong and sophomore guard Myles Franklin. It was a signal that both will be contending for important minutes next season.

They will need time to recover from their disappointing result against Kansas, but the Huskies recognize there could be another opportunity in the near future.

“It doesn’t take away what they accomplished this year, and just getting to this point and playing in this tournament,” Coen said of his players moments after the loss on Thursday. “It was an experience we’ll all remember for the rest of our lives.”

For media inquiries, please contact media@northeastern.edu.

‘I couldn’t be prouder of this group.’

SALT LAKE CITY—Northeastern guard Shawn Occeus is met by a crowd of Jayhawks as he drives the lane in the Huskies' 87-53 first-round loss to Kansas in the NCAA Tournament. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

SALT LAKE CITY—Defenders fighting over screens to prevent him from shooting. Big men switching onto him. Extra men arriving to cut off his dribble.

After two years as Northeastern’s star point guard, Vasa Pusica had grown used to all of these tactics. But he had never seen them executed with such breathtaking force as on Thursday.

“The athleticism is a big difference when you play teams like this,” Pusica said in the quiet of the locker room after his 13th-seeded Huskies had been beaten 87-53 by No. 4 University of Kansas in their opening game of the NCAA Tournament. “I felt like we were never getting easy looks all game long. Even when we made some, they were tough shots.”

The Jayhawks knew they had to neutralize Pusica, the 6-foot-5-inch senior point guard who had led Northeastern (23-11) with 17.8 points this season while making half of his shots overall, including 40 percent from the 3-point line. On Thursday, Kansas held Northeastern’s senior leader to seven points and 11 errant shots on 13 attempts, including four of six misses from the arc.

“I think everybody almost wanted it too badly to happen, and sometimes when you try too hard, or you push too much, or you put too much expectation on yourself, you cannot perform at a high level,” said Northeastern coach Bill Coen. “But we would not be playing today—we’d all be home home, glued to our TVs watching—if not for Vasa.”

The underdog Huskies arrive Thursday afternoon for their showdown with Kansas. Photos by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

Many prognosticators had picked the Huskies, in the belief that their experience and 3-point shooting would outweigh the explosive advantages of a young Kansas roster rich with high-flying McDonald’s All-Americans. But youth, speed, and length won out. The perimeter-based Huskies, who had ranked 16th in the NCAA in 3-point shooting this season, made just 21.4 percent of their 3s and 28.1 percent of their shots overall. Instead of making their typically high rate of catch-and-shoot jumpers, they found themselves missing shots off the dribble.

“They took us out of our identity,” Coen said. “Typically we’re a team that moves and shares the ball and gets quality looks … Their defensive scheme turned our team, which has typically an elite teamwork philosophy, into a one-on-one game.”

The Huskies were led by junior guard Jordan Roland, who scored 12 points on 13 shots while hitting an early pair from the arc to establish a Northeastern record of 99 3-pointers this season.

Their shots weren’t falling early, but the Huskies still had hope going into halftime. Photos by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

While Northeastern’s best player, Pusica, was being overwhelmed by a multitude of defenders, Kansas 6-foot-9-inch star Dedric Lawson was creating mismatches to carry his team from the start. Lawson’s game-highs of 25 points (9 of 16, including 3 of 5 3-pointers) and 11 rebounds provided Kansas with a foundation from which to build.

Northeastern missed nine of its last 10 shots in the first half as Kansas began to pull away. The Jayhawks were attacking early in their offense for the easy points that weren’t coming from the 3-point line, where they went 2 of 12 in the half. Their trend of penetrating to the basket continued throughout the final 20 minutes.

Coming out of the half trailing 37-25, the Huskies briefly cut their deficit to seven points around some inspired paint play at both ends by senior center Anthony Green. Then Kansas coach Bill Self called timeout to order his team to stop “jacking around,” and that was that. They outscored Northeastern 50-23 over the final 17 minutes. Even their weakness of 3-point shooting turned into a strength, as the Jayhawks made 6 of 10 in the second half. They shot 70 percent in the second half (19 of 27) to set a college record at Vivint Smart Home Arena.

The players on this Huskies team were making their March Madness debuts. Photos by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

“They were on a run, and it felt like we had no chance of coming back,” Pusica said.

“Our guys were as locked in as they have been in a long time,” said Self, who is 38-14 in the NCAA Tournament with the Jayhawks. Kansas will be facing No. 5 Auburn in the second round on Saturday.

Guard Devon Dotson, one of four freshmen in the Jayhawks’ starting lineup, added 18 points. Dedric and K.J. Lawson, the brothers who transferred from the University of Memphis two years ago, combined for 38 points on 26 shots.

The favored Jayhawks, who were ranked No. 1 in the country earlier this season, proved to be too much. Photos by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

Trailing 53-32 with 12:26 to go, Coen briefly tried to change the dynamic by surrounding Pusica and Green with senior forward Jeremy Miller, sophomore guard Myles Franklin, and freshman forward Jason Strong—none of whom had been expected to play.

But there were no moves he could make to overcome an opponent that had been ranked No. 1 in the country as recently as December. But the Jayhawks suffered personnel losses that ended their championship streak in the Big 12 conference at 14 years. On Thursday, they were able to regain some of their old institutional confidence at Northeastern’s expense.

“I couldn’t be prouder of this group,” Coen said. “It doesn’t take away what they accomplished this year.”

A member of the Northeastern band anticipated a big day. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

The senior class of Pusica, Green, and Miller had led Northeastern to 23 wins each of the last two seasons, and its second NCAA Tournament appearance in 28 years. Much as the Huskies were able to grow from the misery of their loss in the 2018 Colonial Athletic Association tournament, so, too, was Pusica hoping that future teams look back on this painful experience as a launching point.

“Obviously we didn’t want to finish this way,” Pusica said. “But it’s basketball, it’s life, and you learn from it. Hopefully this team can learn learn the lesson and get better.”

For media inquiries, please contact media@northeastern.edu.

Huskies fall short

SALT LAKE CITY—The Kansas Jayhawks held Northeastern's Vasa Pusica to a disappointing 7 points in their 87-53 defeat of the Huskies in the first round of the NCAA Tournament at the Vivint Smart Home Arena. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

SALT LAKE CITY—The 13th-seeded Northeastern Huskies lost to the No. 4 Kansas Jayhawks, 87-53, in their opening game of the NCAA Tournament on Thursday.

Northeastern’s two big weapons were neutralized by Kansas. Senior point guard Vasa Pusica finished his college career with a disappointing seven points. After making half of his shots overall this season, including 40 percent from the 3-point line, he was held to two-of-13 shooting  (while missing four of his six 3-point attempts) with one assist.

SALT LAKE CITY—Northeastern guard Shawn Occeus is met by a crowd of Kansas Jayhawks as he drives the lane in the first round of the NCAA Tournament at the Vivint Smart Home Arena. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

His teammates fared no better. The Huskies were the 16th-best 3-point shooting team in the NCAA this season, but Kansas ruined hopes of an upset by limiting them to 6 of 28 from distance.

Northeastern was led by Jordan Roland, who scored 12 points on 13 shots.

While Pusica struggled, the Jayhawks were driven by their star, 6-foot-9-inch Dedric Lawson, who generated matchup nightmares on his way to a game-high 25 points (on 16 shots) and 11 rebounds. Guard Devon Dotson, one of four freshmen in the Jayhawks’ starting lineup, added 18 points.

The Jayhawks began to pull away before intermission, attacking early in their offense for the easy points that weren’t coming from the 3-point line, where they went 2 of 12 in the opening half. Their trend of penetrating to the basket continued throughout the final 20 minutes.

The Jayhawks (26-9) had been the preseason No. 1 pick and had retained the ranking into December amid a 9-0 start. Personnel losses resulted in their failure to win the Big 12 for the first time in 15 years, but this outcome showed that they enjoyed a large competitive advantage over the Huskies, who were making their second March Madness appearance in 28 years. They were outrebounded 45-27 by Kansas, which shot 55.7 percent overall.

For media inquiries, please contact media@northeastern.edu.

Huskies history in March Madness: 39 years and counting

The Northeastern men are returning to the NCAA Tournament for the ninth time. Six of those runs covered a span of seven years in the 1980s, including the golden era of Hall of Fame coach Jim Calhoun and future NBA All-Star Reggie Lewis. Bill Coen will be making his second Big Dance appearance as coach of the Huskies. Take a look back at some other stats of note in our March Madness time machine.

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Welcome home, Huskies!

The Northeastern men’s basketball team, fresh off Tuesday night’s March-Madness-clinching win over Hofstra in North Charleston, South Carolina, was welcomed back to the Boston campus Wednesday by a cheering, chanting, cowbell-ringing crowd.

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