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Take 5: Where to find artwork across campus

Students view artwork in Northeastern's Gallery 360. Photo by Mary Knox. Merrill.

Here’s a rundown of some of the top spots on campus where you can find a range of art exhibits, unique collections, and a new mural.

1. Gallery 360:
The 1,000-square-foot gallery, located within a corridor between the Curry Student Center and Ell Hall, hosts about 20 shows a year. The gallery highlights the work of Northeastern students and faculty, Boston-area artists, and nationally and internationally known artists and exhibits. Shows in the last year have focused on Northeastern seniors’ work (an exhibit still open through June 1), kindergarten and its global influence, British Pop, and a collection of typewriters once owned by prominent 20th-century figures. Read more on Gallery 360’s history here.

Gallery 360's annual faculty exhibition in 2013 celebrating the work of faculty in the Department of Art + Design. Photo by Jamie Levine.

Gallery 360’s annual faculty exhibition in 2013 celebrating the work of faculty in the Department of Art + Design. Photo by Jamie Levine.

2. Campus mural:
Artist Daniel Anguilu recently painted a beautiful mural on the retaining wall of the pedestrian bridge that traverses the MBTA tracks connecting the main campus with the Columbus Avenue parking garage. The mural faces the Curry Student Center. Anguilu noted that he drew inspiration for the work from Gabriel García Márquez, the renowned Colombian author who passed away last month. Anguilu was the first artist-in-residence as part of a new public art initiative providing faculty, students, and artists around the world “canvases” on campus to display their work.

Artist Daniel Anguilu's campus mural, located on the retaining wall of the pedestrian bridge next to the Curry Student Center. Photo by Brooks Canaday.

Artist Daniel Anguilu’s campus mural, located on the retaining wall of the pedestrian bridge next to the Curry Student Center. Photo by Brooks Canaday.

3. International Village:
The building houses many installations, including a 240-square-foot mural by renowned urban artist Shepard Fairey and a motorcycle sculpture by Northeastern graduate Michael Ulman, AS’00, that is composed of found objects. Topographical photography taken by retired faculty member Julie Curtis also hangs in one of the building’s stairwells. The INV lobby features a variety of rotating shows, most recently an exhibit marking the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings that featured stories and images from Northeastern’s Our Marathon digital archive project.

A traveling exhibit on how Japan's architectural community responded to the Great East Japan Earthquake was on display at Northeastern in 2013. It was the exhibit's only U.S. stop on its global tour. Photo by Brooks Canaday.

A traveling exhibit on how Japan’s architectural community responded to the Great East Japan Earthquake was on display at Northeastern in 2013. It was the exhibit’s only U.S. stop on its global tour. Photo by Brooks Canaday.

4. Ryder Hall:
Those passing through Ryder Hall are greeted by diverse pieces of artwork by students, faculty, and staff that are featured in display cases, hung from the ceiling and spiral staircase, and exhibited on walls throughout the building. Last month, an outdoor, interactive installation dubbed .vote was also unveiled. Passers-by express how they’re feeling at the moment by pushing a button—or by voting online—that corresponds to their current mood; each night the results are reflected on a three-dimensional LED matrix mounted on the building’s façade. The installation is the result of a collaboration between Philips Color Kinetics and Northeastern’s Master of Fine Arts in Information Design and Visualization.

The interactive .vote installation is seen at night outside Ryder Hall. Photo by Maria Amasanti.

The interactive .vote installation is seen at night outside Ryder Hall. Photo by Maria Amasanti.

5. University Libraries:
The fourth floor of Snell Library features a range of artwork donated by avid collector Arthur Goldberg, MEd’65, who has contributed numerous pieces from his collection to Northeastern over the years. Read more about the collection here.  A collection of historically significant maps, Audubon prints, engravings, and other pieces courtesy of Graham Arader is also on display around the building’s classroom entrance on the first floor.

English professor Marina Leslie teaches her class, "Opening the Archive," using maps from the Arader Galleries Collection in Snell Library. Photo by Brooks Canaday.

English professor Marina Leslie teaches her class, “Opening the Archive,” using maps from the Arader Galleries Collection in Snell Library. Photo by Brooks Canaday.

(And here’s one more, because a list of five isn’t enough to capture the many places to view art on campus.)
6. There are a number of outdoor sculptures across Northeastern’s campus, including this one in West Village.

A student walks through West Village, framed by a portion of "Homage to Galileo," a sculpture by artist David Bakalar. Photo by Brooks Canaday.

A student walks through West Village, framed by a portion of “Homage to Galileo,” a sculpture by artist David Bakalar. Photo by Brooks Canaday.