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Northeastern honored with U.S. Olympic Achievement Award

Northeastern University was honored with a prestigious U.S. Olympic Achievement Award at the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) Convention this summer. The University was one of only 41 schools nationally to receive the award, in its inaugural year, and was the only Colonial Athletic Association school and one of just two Hockey East schools to receive the honor.

The award – which recognizes colleges and universities whose student-athletes and coaches have won Olympic medals – was created by the U.S. Olympic Committee, U.S. National Governing Bodies for Sport (NGBs) and the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA).

A total of 28 athletes and 38 coaches from 41 institutions contributed to the USA’s medal success at the last two Olympic Games in Beijing (2008) and Vancouver (2010). Colleges and universities are recognized based on two criteria: having a current student-athlete who was part of a medal-winning performance or a coach who was a credentialed member of the U.S. Olympic Team delegation and his/her athlete or team won a medal.

Northeastern was represented by women’s ice hockey head coach Dave Flint, who won a silver medal as an assistant coach for the U.S. women’s ice hockey team. Flint is no stranger to USA Hockey, serving on the staff since 2005. In 2008, he was appointed the goaltending coach and advisor for the women’s national program, where he evaluates and instructs goaltenders at all levels. Flint also served as an assistant coach to the U.S. Select Team that participated in the Four Nations Cup in 2009.

“When Dave Flint was selected to coach our Olympic women’s hockey team, it was an honor for everyone associated with Northeastern and our athletics program,” said Peter Roby, Northeastern’s director of athletics. “We are thrilled to be recognized by the USOC, NGBs and NACDA, and we are proud of Coach Flint. We remain committed to supporting our coaches and student-athletes as they pursue their Olympic dreams.”

The U.S. Olympic Achievement Award will be presented every two years following the Olympic Games. Two versions of the award will be given: an actual medal that will be presented to each institution’s athletics director, and a presentation piece to be showcased by the athletics department.