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  • Why Can’t U.S. Health Care Costs Be Cut in Half?

    Harvard Business Review - 10/29/2013

    Technological improvements in health care have given us the quality of life we enjoy today. But chronic conditions, end-of-life care, and an aging society will bankrupt the United States if it doesn’t make dramatic changes to its health care system. America — and many other countries — need an audacious goal to get off the unsustainable path.

    What if the United States set itself the goal of cutting healthcare costs in half — without sacrificing quality, and in about a decade?

    Sound undoable? In “Delivering World-Class Health Care, Affordably,” we argued that some Indian hospitals are delivering high-quality care at 5% to 10% of U.S. prices. Of course, the United States is not India, so its costs will always be higher. But even with all the constraints, cutting U.S. healthcare costs in half is not preposterous. After all, it’s been done in other industries, sometimes in less time (think computers or consumer electronics).

    Or take the example of autos. When Karl Benz introduced the Mercedes Benz in 1876, each car was handmade from start to finish. Every customer was assumed to be unique and so was every car. Making autos was a craft, and very few people were skilled enough to put one together. Buyers visited the Benz factory and stayed for a week to test drive the car and fix any bugs before taking delivery. The net result: The craft approach produced only a few automobiles at extremely high cost for the very rich.