In the Media

  • Want to help your colleagues? Try logging off for a while

    Boston Globe -- 08/29/2018

    A recent study by business researchers at Harvard, Boston University, and Northeastern University found that colleagues who are in constant contact with each other may actually be less effective than groups that reserve some time to work independently.

  • Artificial intelligence gaining ground as college teaching tool

    EducationDive -- 08/29/2018

    Nevertheless, a 2018 Gallup-Northeastern University survey shows that of 3,297 U.S. citizens interviewed, only 22% with a bachelor’s degree said their education left them “well” or “very well prepared” to use AI in their jobs.

  • Boston councilor wants new buildings to be more energy efficient

    Boston Herald -- 08/29/2018

    Joan Fitzgerald, a professor at Northeastern University and one of the members of the working group, said some of the biggest energy users in any city are buildings, usually second only to transportation.

  • Why More Cities Should Offer Summer Jobs for Teens

    Harvard Business Review -- 08/29/2018

    Recently, the United States marked a record seven-year stretch of continuous monthly job creation, resulting in a historically low unemployment rate of 4%. In addition to signaling a strong economy, a tight labor market typically improves job prospects for groups with fewer skills and less experience, including teens.

  • Pumpkin Spice Latte Is Arriving Early, But Will It Cure Starbucks’ Blues?

    Forbes -- 08/29/2018

    Bruce Clark, a professor of marketing at the School of Business at Northeastern University in Boston, says the pumpkin spice latte offers customers what they want: “Fat, sugar and salt, plus the additional boost from caffeine. Finally, the smell of the drink is important as scent is an important trigger for memories and emotions.”…

  • The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Product design as an exercise of power and manipulation

    The Privacy Advisor -- 08/29/2018

    Our modern privacy frameworks, with their emphasis on gaining informed consent from consumers in order to use their data, are broken models. That’s according to Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Northeastern University in Boston. In this episode of The Privacy Advisor Podcast, Hartzog discusses the ways that, given such models, technologies are designed at the engineering level to undermine user privacy.

  • When children were always someone else’s problem

    Boston Globe -- 08/29/2018

    In the 1870s, in the absence of lab tests, criminal cases were reliant on testimony of witnesses, said Daniel S. Medwed, a professor of law and criminal justice at Northeastern University. That also meant that either damning or exculpatory testimonies could be overvalued and affect the outcome of a case, Medwed said.

  • Secretly recording someone doesn’t fly under Massachusetts law

    Berkshire Eagle -- 08/29/2018

    Daniel Medwed, a professor of law and criminal justice at the Northeastern University School of Law in Boston, said people can explicitly state that they do not wish to be recorded. …

  • Why aren’t more people using Alexa to shop? It may because we love to price compare

    USA Today -- 08/29/2018

    According to a 2016 study from a trio of Northeastern University researchers, 44 percent of shoppers head straight to Amazon to make their purchases, which typically makes it harder to find the best deal. According to the Northeastern researchers, 82 percent of orders are placed in what’s called the “Buy Box” – the area to the right of the product description with the “Add-to-Cart” button. But the most favorable pricing usually takes another few clicks to tease out by clicking on the tinier link to “other sellers” that includes other offerings, the study found. …

  • New Study: Too Much Collaboration May Be Bad

    Poets & Quants -- 08/29/2018

    The study, by Berstein of Harvard Business School, Professor Jesse Shore of the Questrom School of Business at Boston University and Professor David Lazer of Northeastern University, finds that intermittent collaboration may be better for complex problem solving than “always on” collaboration.

  • Here’s what Maryland schools are doing to help prevent shootings, other threats this year

    Capital Gazette -- 08/29/2018

    Mass school shootings are still rare, according to research by James Alan Fox of Northeastern University: Since 1996, there have been 16 multiple-victim shootings in schools, or incidents involving four or more victims and at least two deaths, excluding the assailant. — and more kids die each year in bicycle accidents.

  • The New Old Age

    The Walrus -- 08/29/2018

    Research on superagers is in its infancy, but Lisa Barrett, a psychology professor at Northeastern University, says that joining that exclusive group is about more than inheriting good genes or enjoying financial security: based on the available scientific evidence, a lot of it has to do with social interactions and persistent mental and physical exercise. (Doctors suggest, for example, that a cardio workout three times a week is essential if I want to guard against dementia. That’s my idea of torture.)…